Watts Needle

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Watts Needle ( 80°44′S24°59′W / 80.733°S 24.983°W / -80.733; -24.983 Coordinates: 80°44′S24°59′W / 80.733°S 24.983°W / -80.733; -24.983 ) is a needle-shaped peak (1,450 m) at the southwest end of the ridge east of Glen Glacier, in the Read Mountains, Shackleton Range. It was photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy in 1967 and was surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) from 1968-71. In association with the names of geologists grouped in this area, it was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1971 after William Whitehead Watts (1860–1947), a British geologist who worked particularly on the Precambrian rocks of the English midlands. Watts was also a professor of geology at the Imperial College in London from 1906-30.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Glen Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Glen Glacier is a glacier at least 7 nautical miles (13 km) long, flowing south in the Shackleton Range of Antarctica to join Recovery Glacier to the west of the Read Mountains. It was first mapped in 1957 by the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition (CTAE) and named for Alexander R. Glen, a member of the Committee of Management of the CTAE, 1955–58.

Read Mountains is a group of rocky summits, the highest Holmes Summit 1,875 m, lying east of Glen Glacier in the south-central part of the Shackleton Range. First mapped in 1957 by the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition and named for Professor Herbert H. Read, Chairman of the Scientific Committee and member of the Committee of Management of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1955-58.

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Drygalski Glacier (Antarctica) glacier in Antarctica

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Zittel Cliffs

Zittel Cliffs is a set of cliffs rising to about 1,400 m in the northwest part of Du Toit Nunataks, Read Mountains, Shackleton Range. The feature was surveyed by the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1957, photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and further surveyed by British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1968-71. In association with the names of geologists grouped in this area, named by United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1971 after Karl Alfred von Zittel (1839-1904), German paleontologist who specialized in the study of fossil sponges.

Aitkenhead Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Aitkenhead Glacier is a 10-mile (16 km) long glacier flowing east-southeast from the Detroit Plateau, Graham Land, into Prince Gustav Channel. It was mapped from surveys by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) (1960–61), and named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Neil Aitkenhead, a FIDS geologist at Hope Bay (1959–60).

Nicol Crags

Nicol Crags is a rock crags rising to about 1,300 m to the south of Arkell Cirque in the Read Mountains, Shackleton Range. Photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and surveyed by British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1968–71. In association with the names of geologists grouped in this area, named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1971 after William Nicol (1770–1851), Scottish natural philosopher who devised the Nicol prism and the preparation of thin rock sections, thus contributing to the techniques of microscopy.

Mount Watters is a massive peak westward of Scythian Nunatak in the Allan Hills, Victoria Land. Reconnoitered by the New Zealand Antarctic Research Program (NZARP) Allan Hills Expedition (1964) and named after W.A. Watters, a geologist with the expedition.

Mount Wegener

Mount Wegener is a mountain rising to 1,385 m in central Read Mountains, Shackleton Range. The feature was photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy in 1967 and was surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) from 1968-71. It was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in association with the names of geologists grouped in this area after Alfred L. Wegener (1880–1930), a German astronomer, meteorologist, Arctic explorer, and a pioneer of the theory of continental drift. Wegener was a professor of geophysics and meteorology at the University of Graz in Austria between 1924–30 and was the leader of German expeditions to Greenland in 1929 and 1930 before losing his life on the ice cap in November of that year.

Sumgin Buttress

Sumgin Buttress is a prominent elevated rock mass 2.5 nautical miles (4.6 km) southwest of Charpentier Pyramid, rising to about 1,100 m on the west side of Herbert Mountains, Shackleton Range. It was roughly surveyed by the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1957 and was photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy in 1967. It was resurveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) between 1968-71. In association with the names of glacial geologists grouped in this area, it was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1971 after Mikhail I. Sumgin (1873–1942), a Russian pioneer in permafrost research.

Murchison Cirque

Murchison Cirque is a glacier-filled cirque between Kuno Cirque and Arkell Cirque on the south side of the Read Mountains, Shackleton Range. Photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and surveyed by British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1968-71. In association with the names of geologists grouped in this area, named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1971 after Sir Roderick Impey Murchison (1792–1871), British geologist; President, Royal Geographical Society, 1843–44, 1851–52, and 1855–58; Director-General, Geological Survey of Great Britain, 1855-71.

The Gruvletindane Crags are rock crags, rising to 2,255 metres (7,400 ft) and forming the north end of the Kurze Mountains of Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. They were mapped from surveys and air photos by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named Gruvletindane. The feature is bounded on the western side by a large and prominent glacial moraine.

Poldervaart Edge

Poldervaart Edge is an east-facing escarpment rising to about 1,300 m and trending NE-SW for 3.5 nautical miles (6 km) in the Du Toit Nunataks, Read Mountains, Shackleton Range. Photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and surveyed by British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1968-71. In association with the names of geologists grouped in this area, named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1971 after Professor Arie Poldervaart (1919–64), Dutch petrologist known for his research on basaltic rocks.

Patterson Peak is a peak, 1,610 m, standing at the south end of Medina Peaks, 4 nautical miles (7 km) northwest of Anderson Ridge, in the Queen Maud Mountains of Antarctica. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from ground surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-64. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Clair C. Patterson, glaciologist at Byrd Station, summer 1965-66.

Fredriksen Island

Fredriksen Island is an island 5 km (3.1 mi) long and 1 km (0.62 mi) wide, lying 1 km south-east of Powell Island in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. It was discovered by Captains Nathaniel Palmer and George Powell in the course of their joint cruise in December 1821. It was named by Norwegian whaling captain Petter Sorlle, who made a running survey of the island in the 1912–13 summer.

Goldschmidt Cirque is a cirque at the west side of the Trueman Terraces in the eastern portion of the Read Mountains, Shackleton Range, Antarctica. It was photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and was surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey, 1968–71. In association with the names of geologists grouped in this area, it was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after Victor M. Goldschmidt, a Norwegian geochemist and pioneer in the field of crystal chemistry.

Hatch Plain is a small debris-covered area at about 1,350 metres (4,430 ft), on the eastern margin of the Du Toit Nunataks, in the Read Mountains of the Shackleton Range, Antarctica. It was photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy in 1967, and surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey, 1968–71. In association with the names of geologists grouped in this area, it was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1971 after Frederick H. Hatch (1864–1932), a British consulting geologist, and the author of standard textbooks on igneous and sedimentary petrology.

Hazard Rock is a small isolated rock, 1 metre (3 ft) high, lying on the east side of Butler Passage, 2.5 nautical miles (5 km) northeast of Cape Renard, off the west coast of Graham Land, on the Antarctic Peninsula. It was named by Lieutenant Commander F.W. Hunt, Royal Navy, following his survey in 1952. This feature is a hazard to navigation in the low visibility which is frequent in this vicinity.

Huitfeldt Point is a point southeast of Vorweg Point on the southwest side of Barilari Bay, on the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. It was charted by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill, 1934–37, and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1959 for Fritz R. Huitfeldt, a Norwegian pioneer ski exponent, the author of one of the earliest skiing manuals, and the designer of the Huitfeldt ski binding, for long the standard binding.

Hooper Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Hooper Glacier is a glacier 3 nautical miles (6 km) long, flowing from the col north of Mount William into the west side of Börgen Bay, Anvers Island, in the Palmer Archipelago, Antarctica. It was surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1955, and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Peter R. Hooper of FIDS, leader and geologist at the Arthur Harbour station in 1955 and 1956.

Lapworth Cirque is a cirque to the west of Goldschmidt Cirque in the eastern portion of the Read Mountains of the Shackleton Range, Antarctica. It was photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy in 1967, and surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey, 1968–71. In association with the names of geologists grouped in this area, it was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1971 after British geologist Charles Lapworth, who established the stratigraphic succession in southern Scotland and who defined the Ordovician system; he was Professor of Geology and Physiography at Birmingham University, 1881–1913.

References

    PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Watts Needle" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

    United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

    The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

    Geographic Names Information System geographical database

    The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.