Wattsia mossambica

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Wattsia mossambica
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
Order:
Family:
Genus:
Wattsia

Species:
W. mossambica
Binomial name
Wattsia mossambica
Synonyms
  • Gnathodentex mossambicusJ. L. B. Smith, 1957

Wattsia mossambica, the Mozambique large-eye bream, is a species of emperor native to the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific Ocean. It is a deep-water fish, being found along the outer edges of the continental shelves at depths of from 100 to 180 metres (330 to 590 ft). This species grows to a length of 55 centimetres (22 in) TL though most do not exceed 35 centimetres (14 in). It is of minor importance to local commercial fisheries. This species is the only known member of its genus. [2]

In biology, a species is the basic unit of classification and a taxonomic rank of an organism, as well as a unit of biodiversity. A species is often defined as the largest group of organisms in which any two individuals of the appropriate sexes or mating types can produce fertile offspring, typically by sexual reproduction. Other ways of defining species include their karyotype, DNA sequence, morphology, behaviour or ecological niche. In addition, paleontologists use the concept of the chronospecies since fossil reproduction cannot be examined.

Lethrinidae family of fishes in the order Perciformes

The Lethrinidae are a family of fishes in the order Perciformes commonly known as emperors, emperor breams, and pigface breams. These fish are found in tropical waters of the Pacific and Indian Oceans, and Lethrinus atlanticus is also found in the eastern Atlantic. They are benthic feeders, consuming invertebrates and small fishes. Some species have molariform teeth which they use to eat shelled invertebrates, such as mollusks and crabs.

Indian Ocean The ocean between Africa, Asia, Australia and Antarctica (or the Southern Ocean)

The Indian Ocean is the third-largest of the world's oceanic divisions, covering 70,560,000 km2 (27,240,000 sq mi). It is bounded by Asia on the north, on the west by Africa, on the east by Australia, and on the south by the Southern Ocean or, depending on definition, by Antarctica.

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References

  1. Carpenter K. E., Lawrence A. & Myers R. (2016). "Wattsia mossambica". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2016: e.T16721842A16722465. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-3.RLTS.T16721842A16722465.en . Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  2. Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2013). "Wattsia mossambica" in FishBase . December 2013 version.