Waugh Peak

Last updated

Waugh Peak ( 86°4′S160°36′W / 86.067°S 160.600°W / -86.067; -160.600 Coordinates: 86°4′S160°36′W / 86.067°S 160.600°W / -86.067; -160.600 ) is a rock peak, 2,430 m, standing just southeast of Breyer Mesa at the west side of Amundsen Glacier, in the Queen Maud Mountains. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Douglas Waugh, Chief Cartographer with the Geological Society of America from 1963, who has contributed much to the Society's Antarctic mapping program.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Breyer Mesa is an ice-covered mesa, 5 nautical miles (9 km) long and rising over 3,000 metres (10,000 ft), standing between Christy Glacier and Tate Glacier on the west side of Amundsen Glacier, in the Queen Maud Mountains. It was discovered by R. Admiral Byrd on the South Pole flight of November 1929, and named by him for Robert S. Breyer, West Coast representative and patron of the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, 1928–30. The name "Mount Breyer" was previously recommended for this feature, but the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names has amended the terminology to the more suitable Breyer Mesa.

Amundsen Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Amundsen Glacier is a major Antarctic glacier, about 6 to 10 km wide and 128 km (80 mi) long, originating on the polar plateau where it drains the area to the south and west of Nilsen Plateau, and descending through the Queen Maud Mountains to enter the Ross Ice Shelf just west of the MacDonald Nunataks. The tributary Blackwall Glacier flows northwest along the northeast side of Hansen Spur to join Amundsen Glacier.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Waugh Peak" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


Related Research Articles

Usarp Mountains

The Usarp Mountains is a major Antarctic mountain range, lying westward of the Rennick Glacier and trending N-S for about 190 kilometres (118 mi). The feature is bounded to the north by Pryor Glacier and the Wilson Hills. Its important constituent parts include Welcome Mountain, Mount Van der Hoeven, Mount Weihaupt, Mount Stuart, Mount Lorius, Smith Bench, Mount Roberts, Pomerantz Tableland, Daniels Range, Emlen Peaks, Helliwell Hills and Morozumi Range.

Young Glacier glacier which flows east for 8 miles and terminates at the north end of Barnes Ridge, Antarctica

Young Glacier is a glacier which flows from Mount Gozur and Ichera Peak in Maglenik Heights eastwards for 8 miles (13 km) and terminates at the north end of Barnes Ridge on the east side of Sentinel Range, Ellsworth Mountains in Antarctica. It was first mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos from 1957-59. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for First Lieutenant Dale L. Young of the United States Air Force (USAF), who participated in establishing the South Pole Station in the 1956–57 season.

Mount Przywitowski is a mountain, 2,770 m, standing at the southeast side of Holdsworth Glacier, 2.5 nautical miles (4.6 km) west of McNally Peak, in the Queen Maud Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-64. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Richard F. Przywitowski, "Ski", United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) scientific leader at South Pole Station, winter over 1966, and scientific leader at McMurdo Station winter over 1968.

Lawrie Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Lawrie Glacier is a glacier flowing between Mount Genecand and Mezzo Buttress, and entering the head of Barilari Bay between Cherkovna Point and Prestoy Point on the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. It was charted by the British Graham Land Expedition under Rymill, 1934–37, and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1959 for Robert Lawrie, an English alpine and polar equipment specialist.

Wotkyns Glacier is a glacier flowing north from Michigan Plateau along the west side of Caloplaca Hills to enter the Reedy Glacier. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-64. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Grosvenor S. Wotkyns, hospital corpsman at Byrd Station in 1962.

Appalachia Nunataks

The Appalachia Nunataks are a group of nunataks rising to about 600 metres (2,000 ft) on the west side of the Elgar Uplands, Alexander Island, Antarctica. They are situated 5.62 km southwest of Lyubimets Nunatak, 9 km southwest of Kozhuh Peak and 9.65 km north of Atanasov Ridge, and surmount Nichols Snowfield to the west. The feature was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1977 after Appalachia, the 1902 Frederick Delius composition, in association with Delius Glacier and the names of composers in this area.

Gothic Mountains

The Gothic Mountains is a group of mountains, 32 kilometres (20 mi) long, in the Queen Maud Mountains of Antarctica, located west of Watson Escarpment and bounded by Scott Glacier, Albanus Glacier, and Griffith Glacier. The mountains were first visited in December 1934 by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (ByrdAE) geological party led by Quin Blackburn. The name was proposed by Edmund Stump, leader of a U.S. Antarctic Research Program (USARP) - Arizona State University geological party which made investigations here in the 1980-81 season. The mountains are composed of granites which have weathered to produce a series of spires and peaks reminiscent of a Gothic cathedral.

Mount Bowser is a prominent peak, 3,655 metres (11,990 ft) high, standing 2 nautical miles (4 km) south of Mount Astor at the north end of Fram Mesa, in the Queen Maud Mountains. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–64, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Carl J. Bowser, a geologist at McMurdo Station, 1965–66 and 1966–67 seasons.

Mount Crockett is a prominent peak, 3,470 metres (11,380 ft) high, standing 2 nautical miles (4 km) east of Mount Astor in the Hays Mountains of the Queen Maud Mountains. It was discovered by members of the geological party under Laurence Gould during the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, 1928–30, and named by Richard E. Byrd for Frederick E. Crockett, a member of that party. The application of this name has been shifted in accord with the position assigned on the maps resulting from the second Byrd Antarctic Expedition of 1933–35.

Donnachie Cliff is a cliff on Ulu Peninsula, James Ross Island, rising to about 500 metres (1,600 ft) northeast of Back Mesa. Following geological work by the British Antarctic Survey, 1985–86, it was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after Thomas Donnachie, a radio operator on Operation Tabarin at Hope Bay, 1944–45.

Peters Peak is a snow-covered peak, 2,220 m, standing 4 nautical miles (7 km) north of Melrose Peak in the central part of Holyoake Range. Mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) from tellurometer surveys and Navy air photos, 1960-62. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Merrill J. Peters, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) field assistant, 1962-63.

Goetel Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Goetel Glacier is a glacier flowing south between Ullmann Spur and the Precious Peaks into Martel Inlet, Admiralty Bay, on King George Island in the South Shetland Islands. It was named by the Polish Antarctic Expedition, 1980, after Professor Walery Goetel (1889–1972), a Polish geologist and conservationist.

Mount Harkness is a mountain, 1,900 metres (6,200 ft) high, standing 1.5 nautical miles (3 km) south of the Organ Pipe Peaks and forming part of the east wall of Scott Glacier, in the Queen Maud Mountains of Antarctica. It was discovered in December 1934 by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition geological party under Quin Blackburn, and named at that time by Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd for Bruce Harkness, a friend of Richard S. Russell, Jr., a member of that party.

Litz Glacier

Litz Glacier is a glacier flowing northeast from the vicinity of Smith Peak and Litz Bluff in north-central Thurston Island, Antarctica. The glacier enters the west part of Peale Inlet north of the Guy Peaks. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after A.K. Litz, Chief Photographer's Mate in the Eastern Group of Operation Highjump, which obtained aerial photographs of this glacier and adjacent coastal areas, 1946–47.

Heale Peak is a rock peak, 1,340 metres (4,400 ft) high, at the east side of Starshot Glacier, 2 nautical miles (4 km) north of Adams Peak in the Surveyors Range of Antarctica. It was named by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (1960–61) for Theophilus Heale of New Zealand, an early exponent of the use of triangulation in survey (1868), and later Inspector of Survey for New Zealand.

Scudder Mountain is a mountain, 2,280 m, between Organ Pipe Peaks and Mount McKercher on the east side of Scott Glacier in the Queen Maud Mountains, in Antarctica. The name appears in Paul Siple's 1938 botany report on the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, 1933–35, based on exploration of this vicinity by the expedition's geological party led by Quin Blackburn.

Ruotolo Peak is a peak, 2,490 m, surmounting the north side of Griffith Glacier, close west of the California Plateau and Watson Escarpment. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-64. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant Commander Anthony P. Ruotolo, aircraft pilot with U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6 on Operation Deep Freeze 1966 and 1967.

Cape Leblond is a cape forming the northern end of Lavoisier Island, in the Biscoe Islands of Antarctica. It was mapped by the French Antarctic Expedition, 1908–10, under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, and named by him for the President of the Norman Geographical Society at Rouen.

Donnellan Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Donnellan Glacier is a steep valley glacier fed by highland ice adjacent to Opalchenie Peak and Fukushima Peak on Vinson Plateau, the summit plateau of Vinson Massif, in the Sentinel Range of the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica. The glacier flows west-southwestward from Opalchenie Peak along the northwest side of Mount Slaughter into Nimitz Glacier.

Adams Peak is a peak, 1,540 metres (5,050 ft), on the east side of Starshot Glacier, rising 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) south of Heale Peak in the Surveyors Range. Named by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE) (1960-61) for C.W. Adams, one of the early New Zealand surveyors, who in 1883 established the Mount Cook (Wellington) latitude which became the fundamental position for all New Zealand surveys up to 1949.