Waun Rydd

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Waun Rydd
Waunrydd.JPG
Left to right: Pen y Fan and Corn Du, Gwaun Cerrig Llwydion, Waun Rydd and Allt Lwyd from Cefn yr Ystrad
Highest point
Elevation 769 m (2,523 ft)
Prominence 170 m (560 ft)
Parent peak Pen y Fan
Listing Marilyn, Hewitt, Nuttall
Coordinates 51°52′36″N3°21′51″W / 51.8766°N 3.3641°W / 51.8766; -3.3641 Coordinates: 51°52′36″N3°21′51″W / 51.8766°N 3.3641°W / 51.8766; -3.3641
Naming
English translationfree/open bog
Language of name Welsh
Geography
Location Powys, Wales
Parent range Brecon Beacons
OS grid SO012215
Topo map OS Landranger 160
Listed summits of Waun Rydd
NameGrid refHeightStatus
Gwaun Cerrig Llwydion SJ066318 754 metres (2,474 ft) Nuttall
Fan y Big SJ066318 719 metres (2,359 ft) Hewitt, Nuttall
Allt Lwyd SJ066318 654 metres (2,146 ft)sub Hewitt, Nuttall

Waun Rydd is a mountain in the Brecon Beacons National Park, in southern Powys, Wales. Its height is 769m (2,523 ft) and it tops a large boggy plateau rising to the east of Pen y Fan. [1]

Mountain A large landform that rises fairly steeply above the surrounding land over a limited area

A mountain is a large landform that rises above the surrounding land in a limited area, usually in the form of a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a hill. Mountains are formed through tectonic forces or volcanism. These forces can locally raise the surface of the earth. Mountains erode slowly through the action of rivers, weather conditions, and glaciers. A few mountains are isolated summits, but most occur in huge mountain ranges.

Brecon Beacons National Park national park in southern Wales

The Brecon Beacons National Park is one of three national parks in Wales, and is centred on the Brecon Beacons range of hills in southern Wales. It includes the Black Mountain in the west, Fforest Fawr and the Brecon Beacons in the centre and the Black Mountains in the east.

Powys Place

Powys is a principal area and county, and one of the preserved counties of Wales. It is named after the Kingdom of Powys which was a Welsh successor state, petty kingdom and principality that emerged during the Middle Ages following the end of Roman rule in Britain.

The hill takes the form of a plateau with sharp rims on several sides. To the northeast is Craig Pwllfa overlooking Cwm Banw whilst Craig y Fan looks east over Cwm Tarthwynni. To the south is the edge known as Cwar y Gigfran which translates into English as 'quarry of the crow'. It marks the top of a large landslipped area extending to the stream of Blaen y Glyn below.

Several ridges extend north and east from the plateau. That known as Gist Wen runs north-northeast to the subsidiary top of Bryn (561m above sea level). The short ridges of Cefn Bach and Cefn Edmwnt run northeast whilst that of Twyn Du extends eastwards towards Talybont Reservoir. A further ridge runs southeast to the subsidiary top of Allt Lwyd (654m). To the south a broad ridge runs to a col beyond which is the top of Allt Forgan (513m).

Talybont Reservoir reservoir in the United Kingdom

Talybont Reservoir is the largest stillwater reservoir in the central Brecon Beacons at 318 acres (1.29 km2). Talybont-on-Usk is 1.5 miles (2.4 km) downstream of the dam.

Allt Lwyd mountain in United Kingdom

Allt Lwyd is a top of Waun Rydd in the Brecon Beacons National Park, in southern Powys, Wales.

Related Research Articles

Pen y Fan 886m high mountain in Wales

Pen y Fan is the highest peak in south Wales, situated in the Brecon Beacons National Park. At 886 metres (2,907 ft) above sea-level, it is also the highest British peak south of Cadair Idris in Snowdonia. The twin summits of Pen y Fan and Corn Du at 873 m were formerly referred to as Cadair Arthur or 'Arthur's Seat'.

Black Mountains, Wales mountain range

The Black Mountains are a group of hills spread across parts of Powys and Monmouthshire in southeast Wales, and extending across the England–Wales border into Herefordshire. They are the easternmost of the four ranges of hills that comprise the Brecon Beacons National Park, and are frequently confused with the westernmost, which is known as the Black Mountain. The Black Mountains may be roughly defined as those hills contained within a triangle defined by the towns of Abergavenny in the southeast, Hay-on-Wye in the north and the village of Llangors in the west. Other gateway towns to the Black Mountains include Talgarth and Crickhowell. The range of hills is well known to walkers and ramblers for the ease of access and views from the many ridge trails, such as that on the Black Hill (Herefordshire) at the eastern edge of the massif.

Fan y Big hill in United Kingdom formerly categorized as a mountain

Fan y Bîg ( is a subsidiary summit of Waun Rydd in the Brecon Beacons National Park, in southern Powys, Wales. It is 716.6 m high and is often hiked as part of the Horseshoe Walk, a traverse of the four main peaks in the Brecon Beacons.

Craig y Llyn mountain in the United Kingdom

Craig y Llyn is a mountain situated to the south of the village of Rhigos on the south side of the upper Vale of Neath and north of the Rhondda Valleys in South Wales; it is the highest point in the traditional county of Glamorgan, and the South Wales Valleys.

Gwaun y Llwyni mountain in United Kingdom

Gwaun y Llwyni is a subsidiary summit of Aran Fawddwy in southern Snowdonia, Wales. It forms a part of the Aran mountain range.

Cefn Cyfarwydd

Cefn Cyfarwydd is a ridge in Conwy county borough, north Wales. It is located above the village of Trefriw on the western side of the Conwy valley, and dramatically separates Cwm Cowlyd and the rugged mountains of the Carneddau from the greener, lusher Conwy valley.

Fan Fawr mountain in the United Kingdom

Fan Fawr is a mountain in the Fforest Fawr section of the Brecon Beacons National Park, in Powys, Wales and over 734 m (2,408 ft) high.

Pen Cerrig-calch mountain in United Kingdom

Pen Cerrig-calch is a subsidiary summit of Waun Fach in the Black Mountains in the Brecon Beacons National Park in southern Powys, Wales. Its summit, at a height of 701m (2,300 ft), is marked by a trig point. The peak sits high above the River Usk valley as it narrows above the small town of Crickhowell.The views from here are wide-ranging and extend as far as the Beacons themselves to the west. A ridge runs off to the northwest and the shoulder of Pen Gloch-y-pibwr then turns north to the secondary top of Pen Allt-mawr whose peak at 719m is also crowned by a trig point.

Cribin Fawr 658m high mountain in Wales

Cribin Fawr is a mountain in Snowdonia, North Wales, situated approximately four miles to the south-west of Aran Fawddwy. It is one of the peaks in the Dyfi hills, a subgroup of the Cadair Idris group. It is a top of Maesglase, connected to its parent peak by the Craig Portas ridge. The top of Cribin Fawr is a large open plateau of peat bog. To the west is Waun-oer, to the north Cadair Idris, to the south Maesglase and Glasgwm to the east.

Fan Llia mountain in United Kingdom

Fan Llia is a subsidiary summit of Fan Fawr in the Fforest Fawr section of the Brecon Beacons National Park, Wales. In common with other peaks in the Fforest Fawr uplands it lies within the county of Powys.

Waun Lefrith mountain in United Kingdom

Waun Lefrith is a top of Picws Du and is also the westernmost of the Carmarthen Fans or Bannau Sir Gaer, a group of peaks within the Black Mountain of the Brecon Beacons National Park. It lies within Carmarthenshire, Wales. The summit plateau of the mountain reaches a height of 2221 feet above sea level. Picws Du and Fan Foel are the other, higher summits of the Bannau Sir Gaer / Carmarthen Fans. The glacial lake of Llyn y Fan Fach dominates the panorama to the north of the peak. Beyond the lake to the north lies the Usk Reservoir and then the Cambrian Mountains on the horizon. Swansea Bay and the Bristol Channel are visible to the south across the undulating dip slope of the mountain. The Tywi valley lies to the west, with Llandovery and Llandeilo as important market towns nearest to the hills.

Picws Du mountain in United Kingdom

Picws Du is the second highest peak of the Carmarthen Fans in the Carmarthenshire section of the Black Mountain in the west of the Brecon Beacons National Park in south Wales. The highest peak is Fan Foel immediately next along the ridge and it is a subsidiary summit of Fan Brycheiniog. Picws Du falls within Fforest Fawr Geopark and its prominent summit is marked by a large Bronze Age round barrow at a height of 2457 feet above sea level. Waun Lefrith is the other, lower summit of the Bannau Sir Gaer / Carmarthen Fans situated to the west. The peak overlooks the glacial lake of Llyn y Fan Fach in the cwm below. As the peak sits on the edge of the escarpment on a ridge which juts out into the valley below, the views from the summit are panoramic and extensive. The views to the north are especially impressive when the weather is clear, looking towards the Cambrian Mountains, Mynydd Epynt and Brecon. Swansea and the Bristol Channel can just be seen on the horizon to the south, across the gently falling dip slope. Pen y Fan and Corn Du are distinctive landmarks seen directly to the east across Fforest Fawr.

Bwlch y Ddwyallt is the name commonly applied to the high point of the plateau of Gwaun Cerrig Llwydion in the eastern part of the Brecon Beacons in south Wales. It is a top of Waun Rydd.

Pen Twyn Mawr mountain in United Kingdom

Pen Twyn Mawr is a top of Pen y Gadair Fawr in the Black Mountains in south-eastern Wales. It lies on one of the many south ridges of Waun Fach.

Pen Allt-mawr mountain in United Kingdom

Pen Allt-mawr is subsidiary summit of Waun Fach and the third highest peak in the Black Mountains in south-eastern Wales. It lies near the end of the westernmost of Waun Fach's south ridges. It is a very recognisable and prominent peak of the Black Mountains.

Cadair Fawr is a hill in the northern corner of the county borough of Rhondda Cynon Taf, Wales. It lies within the Brecon Beacons National Park and Fforest Fawr Geopark. The 485m high summit at OS grid ref SN 978123 is marked by a trig point. Cadair Fawr is the highest point of a broad ridge known as Cefn Cadlan which forms the northern edge of Cwm Cadlan, a valley which itself runs east-northeastwards from the village of Penderyn. The name Cadair Fawr signifies the 'big chair' whilst Cefn Cadlan signifies the 'ridge of the battlefield'.

Mynydd Cilfach-yr-encil

Mynydd Cilfach-yr-encil attains a height of 445m at OS grid reference SO 079033 making it the high point of the broad ridge of high ground between Taff Vale and Cwm Bargod in the Valleys region of South Wales. It lies within the unitary area of Merthyr Tydfil.

References

  1. Nuttall, John & Anne (1999). The Mountains of England & Wales - Volume 1: Wales (2nd edition ed.). Milnthorpe, Cumbria: Cicerone. ISBN   1-85284-304-7.