Waunakee, Wisconsin

Last updated
Waunakee, Wisconsin
WaunakeeWisconsinDowntown2.jpg
Downtown Waunakee on Wisconsin Highway 19
Dane County Wisconsin Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Waunakee Highlighted.svg
Location of Waunakee in Dane County, Wisconsin.
Coordinates: 43°11′14″N89°27′8″W / 43.18722°N 89.45222°W / 43.18722; -89.45222 Coordinates: 43°11′14″N89°27′8″W / 43.18722°N 89.45222°W / 43.18722; -89.45222
Country Flag of the United States.svg  United States
State Flag of Wisconsin.svg  Wisconsin
County Dane
Government
  Village PresidentChris Zellner [1]
Area
[2]
  Total6.77 sq mi (17.53 km2)
  Land6.76 sq mi (17.51 km2)
  Water0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation
[3]
928 ft (283 m)
Population
 (2010) [4]
  Total12,097
  Estimate 
(2018) [5]
13,924
  Density1,896.1/sq mi (732.1/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP Code
53597
Area code(s) 608
FIPS code 55-84350 [6]
GNIS feature ID1576318 [3]
Welcome sign for Waunakee WaunakeeWisconsinSign.jpg
Welcome sign for Waunakee

Waunakee ( /ˌwɔːnəˈk/ ) [7] is a village in Dane County, Wisconsin, United States (est. 1871). The population was 12,097 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Madison Metropolitan Statistical Area. Waunakee bills itself as "The Only Waunakee in the World." The village was named as #78 in CNN Money's "Top 100 Best Places to Live" for small towns in 2009. [8]

Dane County, Wisconsin U.S. county in Wisconsin

Dane County is a county in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2010 census, the population was 488,075, making it the second-most populous county in Wisconsin. The 2018 estimate places the county's population at 542,364. The county seat is Madison, which is also the state capital.

Wisconsin U.S. state in the United States

Wisconsin is a U.S. state located in the north-central United States, in the Midwest and Great Lakes regions. It is bordered by Minnesota to the west, Iowa to the southwest, Illinois to the south, Lake Michigan to the east, Michigan to the northeast, and Lake Superior to the north. Wisconsin is the 23rd largest state by total area and the 20th most populous. The state capital is Madison, and its largest city is Milwaukee, which is located on the western shore of Lake Michigan. The state is divided into 72 counties.

Madison, Wisconsin Capital of Wisconsin

Madison is the capital of the U.S. state of Wisconsin and the seat of Dane County. As of July 1, 2018, Madison's estimated population of 258,054 made it the second-largest city in Wisconsin by population, after Milwaukee, and the 81st-largest in the United States. The city forms the core of the Madison Metropolitan Area which includes Dane County and neighboring Iowa, Green, and Columbia counties for a population of 654,230.

Contents

History

When the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad wanted to expand its line from Madison to Saint Paul, a door was opened for development of a town. The original location of the village was intended to be at Packham's Mill, about where Mill Road crosses the railroad track today two miles southeast of today's downtown Waunakee. However, two local settlers, Louis Baker and George Fish, platted a village on their land two miles further northwest along the railroad. Railroad officials agreed to moving a train depot to the new community in exchange for $1,500 and two miles of right of way. [9] The village was founded in 1871 and formally incorporated in 1893. [10] Baker and Fish did not want to take credit for naming the community, so they asked Simeon Mills and Mr. Hill of Madison to come up with a list. The name "Waunakee" has a Native American origin meaning "fair and pleasant valley."

Saint Paul, Minnesota Capital of Minnesota

Saint Paul is the capital and second-most populous city of the U.S. state of Minnesota. As of 2018, the city's estimated population was 307,695. Saint Paul is the county seat of Ramsey County, the smallest and most densely populated county in Minnesota. The city lies mostly on the east bank of the Mississippi River in the area surrounding its point of confluence with the Minnesota River, and adjoins Minneapolis, the state's largest city. Known as the "Twin Cities", the two form the core of Minneapolis–Saint Paul, the 16th-largest metropolitan area in the United States, with about 3.6 million residents.

Robert F. Kennedy visited the village to campaign for his brother John for president in February 1960. [11]

Robert F. Kennedy 20th-century American politician and brother of John F. Kennedy

Robert Francis Kennedy was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 64th United States Attorney General from January 1961 to September 1964, and as a U.S. Senator from New York from January 1965 until his assassination in June 1968. Kennedy, like his brothers John and Edward, was a prominent member of the Democratic Party and has come to be viewed by some historians as an icon of modern American liberalism.

John F. Kennedy 35th president of the United States

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, often referred to by initials JFK and Jack, was an American politician who served as the 35th president of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963. Kennedy served at the height of the Cold War, and the majority of his work as president dealt with managing relations with the Soviet Union and Cuba. A Democrat, Kennedy represented Massachusetts in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate prior to becoming president.

Former First Lady Barbara Bush visited the village to campaign for her son George for president in October 2000. [12]

Barbara Bush Former First Lady of the United States

Barbara Pierce Bush was the first lady of the United States from 1989 to 1993 as the wife of George H. W. Bush, who served as the 41st president of the United States, and founder of the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy. She previously was the second lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989. Among her six children are George W. Bush, the 43rd president of the United States, and Jeb Bush, the 43rd governor of Florida.

George W. Bush 43rd president of the United States

George Walker Bush is an American politician and businessman who served as the 43rd president of the United States from 2001 to 2009. He had previously served as the 46th governor of Texas from 1995 to 2000.

The landmark Waunakee Railroad Depot located in the central part of town is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It now houses the Waunakee Area Chamber of Commerce offices.

Waunakee Railroad Depot United States historic place

The Waunakee Railroad Depot is a small wooden depot of the Chicago and North Western Railway built in 1896 in Waunakee, Wisconsin. In 1978 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

Geography

Waunakee is located at 43°11′14″N89°27′8″W / 43.18722°N 89.45222°W / 43.18722; -89.45222 (43.187253, -89.452244). [13]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 6.39 square miles (16.55 km2), of which, 6.38 square miles (16.52 km2) of it is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water. [2]

The village is bordered on the south and east by the town of Westport, the north by the town of Vienna, the northwest by the town of Dane, and to the west by the town of Springfield.

Six Mile Creek, the main waterway through the community, runs west to east before making a southerly turn through the village on its way to Lake Mendota.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 279
1890 31211.8%
1900 44342.0%
1910 55024.2%
1920 5601.8%
1930 64014.3%
1940 77320.8%
1950 1,04234.8%
1960 1,61154.6%
1970 2,18135.4%
1980 3,86677.3%
1990 5,89752.5%
2000 8,99552.5%
2010 12,09734.5%
Est. 201813,924 [5] 15.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [14]

2010 census

As of the census [4] of 2010, there were 12,097 people, 4,344 households, and 3,316 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,896.1 inhabitants per square mile (732.1/km2). There were 4,483 housing units at an average density of 702.7 per square mile (271.3/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 95.8% White, 1.0% African American, 0.2% Native American, 1.2% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.2% of the population.

There were 4,344 households of which 45.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.3% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 23.7% were non-families. 19.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.20.

The median age in the village was 37.9 years. 31.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.8% were from 25 to 44; 27.5% were from 45 to 64; and 9.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 48.8% male and 51.2% female.

2000 census

As of the census [6] of 2000, there were 8,995 people, 3,203 households, and 2,379 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,509.9 people per square mile (582.7/km²). There were 3,295 housing units at an average density of 553.1 per square mile (213.5/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 98.07% White, 0.36% African American, 0.08% Native American, 0.51% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.24% from other races, and 0.73% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.96% of the population.

There are 3,203 households out of which 46.3% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.3% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.7% were non-families. 20.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.23.

In the village, the population was spread out with 32.1% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 33.4% from 25 to 44, 18.6% from 45 to 64, and 9.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.2 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $59,225, and the median income for a family was $67,894. Males had a median income of $45,053 versus $30,163 for females. The per capita income for the village was $25,952. About 0.4% of families and 1.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.4% of those under age 18 and 2.0% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Waunakee is governed by a board consisting of a president and six trustees. The president and trustees are elected to two-year terms during spring elections. [15] The Village President of Waunakee since April 2015 is Chris Zellner [16] .

The village is represented in the Wisconsin State Assembly by Dianne Hesselbein (D-Middleton) and in the State Senate by Jon Erpenbach (D-West Point). [17] The village's representative on the Dane County Board is Tim Kiefer. [18]

Waunakee Village Presidents [16]
Village PresidentTenure
Henry Heller1893-1899
Jacob Buhlman1900-1901
Lawrence Freney1901-1904
Henry Heller1904-1906
J.P. O'Malley1906-1908
George E. Lester1908-1909
Almon W. Cameron1909-1914
Herman J. Doll1914-1924
J.H. Koltes1924-1927
Roy W. Cameron1927-1931
Julius Diederich1931-1934
Herman J. Doll1934-1941
Julius Diederich1941-1947
Roy W. Cameron1947-1951
Harvey Solveson1951-1953
Francis Bowles1953-1955
Roy W. Cameron1955-1957
Joseph Hellenbrand1957-1965
Peter Barbian1965-1967
Ed Hellenbrand1967-1973
Allan Dittman1973-1975
Ann Helt1975-1981
Math Laufenberg1981-1987
Tom Marx1987-1990
Maureen O'Malley1990-1995
Tom Marx1995-1997
Tim Nixon1997-2001
Rich Murphy2001-2003
John Laubmeier2003-2015
Chris Zellner2015-

Economy

Waunakee added a local Village Center in 2006 that acts as a central nucleus for the community by offering a fitness center, senior center, meeting rooms, and a gymnasium. The Waunakee Business Park is a 160-acre (0.65 km2) business park development that hosts large and small business operations. Recent years have seen redevelopments and new apartment buildings on Main Street, a new Main Street streetscape, a mural, and yearly public art displays. [19]

A major employer in the village is Scientific Protein Laboratories.

Transportation

Major highways

Airport

The Waunakee Airport (FAA ID 6P3) is a privately owned general aviation airport 1-mile (1.6 km) south of the village center.

Railroad

A Wisconsin and Southern railroad line runs through town en route to Dane, Lodi, Baraboo, and Reedsburg. [20]

Education

Waunakee is served by the Waunakee Community School District, whose schools include:

The three public elementary schools serve students from kindergarten through 4th grade, the intermediate school 5th and 6th grades, the middle school 7th and 8th grades, and the high school grades 9 through 12.

Private schools include St. John the Baptist Catholic School and Madison Country Day School.

Warrior Stadium is the home of the high school football and track teams.

Notable people

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References


  1. "Board of Trustees". Village of Waunakee. Village of Waunakee. Retrieved 7 July 2019.
  2. 1 2 "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2012-11-18.
  3. 1 2 "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2012-11-18.
  5. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  6. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  7. 'Miss Pronouncer: Wisconsin's Pronunciation Guide: Waunakee, Wisconsin
  8. CNN Money 2009
  9. "History of Waunakee". Village of Waunakee. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  10. "Village of Waunakee History". Waunakee Area Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  11. "Around Town". The Waunakee Tribune. 3 March 1960. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  12. Baumann, Roberta (26 April 2018). "Barbara Bush touched hearts in Waunakee, too". The Waunakee Tribune. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  13. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  14. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  15. Waunakee Board of Trustees Overview
  16. 1 2 Village Presidents by date
  17. "Find Your Legislator". Wisconsin Legislative Districts Interactive Map. Retrieved 7 July 2019.
  18. "Supervisory District 25 Map" (PDF). Dane County. Retrieved 7 July 2019.
  19. "Mutts on Main - 2019 | Waunakee, WI - Official Website". waunakee.com. Retrieved 2019-07-04.
  20. https://watcocompanies.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/WSOR1.pdf