Wauneta, Nebraska

Last updated
Wauneta, Nebraska
Wauneta, Nebraska downtown 1.JPG
Downtown Wauneta: Tecumseh Avenue, looking north
Chase County Nebraska Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Wauneta Highlighted.svg
Location of Wauneta, Nebraska
Coordinates: 40°25′1″N101°22′19″W / 40.41694°N 101.37194°W / 40.41694; -101.37194 Coordinates: 40°25′1″N101°22′19″W / 40.41694°N 101.37194°W / 40.41694; -101.37194
Country United States
State Nebraska
County Chase
Area
[1]
  Total0.97 sq mi (2.51 km2)
  Land0.97 sq mi (2.51 km2)
  Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
2,943 ft (897 m)
Population
 (2010) [2]
  Total577
  Estimate 
(2017) [3]
574
  Density592.36/sq mi (228.60/km2)
Time zone UTC-7 (Mountain (MST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-6 (MDT)
ZIP code
69045
Area code(s) 308
FIPS code 31-51700 [4]
GNIS feature ID0834507 [5]

Wauneta is a village in Chase County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 577 at the 2010 census. It lies along U.S. Route 6 and Nebraska Highway 61 [6] southeast of the city of Imperial, the county seat of Chase County. [7] > Its elevation is 2,942 feet (897 m). [8] Wauneta's ZIP code is 69045. [9]

Chase County, Nebraska U.S. county in Nebraska

Chase County is a county in the U.S. state of Nebraska. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 3,966. Its county seat is Imperial.

Nebraska U.S. state in the United States

Nebraska is a state that lies in both the Great Plains and the Midwestern United States. It is bordered by South Dakota to the north; Iowa to the east and Missouri to the southeast, both across the Missouri River; Kansas to the south; Colorado to the southwest; and Wyoming to the west. It is the only triply landlocked U.S. state.

2010 United States Census 23rd national census of the United States, taken in 2010

The 2010 United States Census is the twenty-third and most recent United States national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010. The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired. The population of the United States was counted as 308,745,538, a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census. This was the first census in which all states recorded a population of over half a million people as well as the first in which all 100 largest cities recorded populations of over 200,000.

Contents

History

The first white settlers at Wauneta were George Rowley and his wife who built a sod house at the Wauneta Falls in 1875. The first post office was established in 1877. A post office has continuously served Wauneta since 1886. The local newspaper “The Wauneta Breeze” has served the community since 1887. [10]

The railroad reached Wauneta in 1892. This line was built by a division of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad. This line left the main line near Culbertson and terminated in Imperial.

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad American railroad from 1855 to 1970

The Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad was a railroad that operated in the Midwestern United States. Commonly referred to as the Burlington Route, the Burlington or as the Q, it operated extensive trackage in the states of Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Wyoming, and also in New Mexico and Texas through subsidiaries Colorado and Southern Railway, Fort Worth and Denver Railway, and Burlington-Rock Island Railroad. Its primary connections included Chicago, Minneapolis-St. Paul, St. Louis, Kansas City and Denver. Because of this extensive trackage in the midwest and mountain states, the railroad used the advertising slogans "Everywhere West", "Way of the Zephyrs", and "The Way West".

Culbertson, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Culbertson is a village in Hitchcock County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 595 at the 2010 census.

National Register of Historic Places listings

Geography

Wauneta is located at 40°25′1″N101°22′19″W / 40.41694°N 101.37194°W / 40.41694; -101.37194 (40.417072, -101.372019). [13]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.97 square miles (2.51 km2), all of it land. [14]

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1900 181
1910 32780.7%
1920 57274.9%
1930 79338.6%
1940 770−2.9%
1950 92620.3%
1960 794−14.3%
1970 738−7.1%
1980 7461.1%
1990 675−9.5%
2000 625−7.4%
2010 577−7.7%
Est. 2017574 [3] −0.5%
U.S. Decennial Census [15]

2010 census

As of the census [2] of 2010, there were 577 people, 269 households, and 150 families residing in the village. The population density was 594.8 inhabitants per square mile (229.7/km2). There were 307 housing units at an average density of 316.5 per square mile (122.2/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 95.7% White, 0.2% African American, 0.2% Asian, 3.5% from other races, and 0.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.6% of the population.

There were 269 households of which 21.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.8% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 44.2% were non-families. 39.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 21.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.03 and the average family size was 2.72.

The median age in the village was 50.4 years. 18.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 17.9% were from 25 to 44; 24.9% were from 45 to 64; and 32.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 46.1% male and 53.9% female.

2000 census

As of the census [4] of 2000, there were 625 people, 280 households, and 180 families residing in the village. The population density was 817.4 people per square mile (317.5/km²). There were 325 housing units at an average density of 425.1 per square mile (165.1/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 96.16% White, 0.16% Black or African American, none Native American, 0.48% Asian, 0.16% Pacific Islander, 2.72% from other races, and 0.32% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.72% of the population.

There were 280 households out of which 23.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.1% were married couples living together, 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.7% were non-families. 32.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.11 and the average family size was 2.65.

In the village, the population was spread out with 18.6% under the age of 18, 5.1% from 18 to 24, 20.6% from 25 to 44, 21.6% from 45 to 64, and 34.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 50 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.9 males.

As of 2000 the median income for a household in the village was $29,813, and the median income for a family was $33,500. Males had a median income of $24,750 versus $16,932 for females. The per capita income for the village was $16,385. About 7.2% of families and 9.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.8% of those under age 18 and 6.1% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people

Dr. George S. Metcalf, archeologist, historian, long-time employee of the Smithsonian Institution [16]

Related Research Articles

Circle, Montana Town in Montana, United States

Circle is a town in and the county seat of McCone County, Montana, United States. The population was 615 at the 2010 census.

Ayr, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Ayr is a village in Adams County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 94 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Hastings, Nebraska Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Cedar Creek, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Cedar Creek is a village in Cass County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 390 at the 2010 census.

Manley, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Manley is a village in Cass County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 178 at the 2010 census.

South Bend, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

South Bend is a village in Cass County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 99 at the 2010 census. The main landmark is a pedestrian bridge across the Platte River which leads to Schramm Park State Recreation Area. It was built in 2004 on the pillars of the abandoned Rock Island Railroad bridge. 35 trains a day—most of them coal trains—still pass through the area on the BNSF Railway main.

Deweese, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Deweese is a village in Clay County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 67 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Hastings, Nebraska Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Berwyn, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Berwyn is a village in Custer County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 83 at the 2010 census.

Callaway, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Callaway is a village in Custer County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 539 at the 2010 census.

Waterloo, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Waterloo is a village in Douglas County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 848 at the 2010 census.

Shickley, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Shickley is a village in Fillmore County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 341 at the 2010 census.

Chambers, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Chambers is a village in Holt County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 268 at the 2010 census.

Page, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Page is a village in Holt County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 166 at the 2010 census.

Winnetoon, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Winnetoon is a village in Knox County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 68 at the 2010 census.

Palmyra, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Palmyra is a village in Otoe County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 545 at the 2010 census.

Malmo, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Malmo is a village in Saunders County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 120 at the 2010 census.

Prague, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Prague is a village in Saunders County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 303 at the 2010 census. It was named after Prague, capital of Bohemia.

Bee, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Bee is a village in Seward County, Nebraska, United States. It is part of the Lincoln, Nebraska Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 191 at the 2010 census.

Walthill, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Walthill is a village in Thurston County, Nebraska, United States, within the Omaha Reservation. The population was 780 at the 2010 census.

Washington, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Washington is a village in Washington County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 150 at the 2010 census.

Oakdale is a town in Monroe County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 679 at the 2000 census. The Village of Oakdale is located within the town.

References

  1. "2017 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jan 12, 2019.
  2. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2012-06-24.
  3. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  4. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. Nebraska Highway Logbook
  7. Rand McNally. The Road Atlas '08. Chicago: Rand McNally, 2008, p. 62.
  8. U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Wauneta, Nebraska, Geographic Names Information System, 1979-03-09. Accessed 2008-04-26.
  9. USPS Zip Code Lookup
  10. History of Wauneta
  11. 1 2 Nebraska State Historical Society
  12. NebraskaStudies.Org
  13. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  14. "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2012-06-24.
  15. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  16. Dr. George S. Metcalf Collection