Waupaca, Wisconsin

Last updated
Waupaca
City
Waupaca City Hall.jpg
Waupaca City Hall/Library Building
Waupaca County Wisconsin Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Waupaca Highlighted.svg
Location of Waupaca in Waupaca County, Wisconsin.
USA Wisconsin location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Waupaca
Location within the state of Wisconsin
Coordinates: 44°21′18″N89°4′54″W / 44.35500°N 89.08167°W / 44.35500; -89.08167 Coordinates: 44°21′18″N89°4′54″W / 44.35500°N 89.08167°W / 44.35500; -89.08167
Country United States
State Wisconsin
County Waupaca
Area
[1]
  Total8.11 sq mi (21.00 km2)
  Land7.82 sq mi (20.25 km2)
  Water0.29 sq mi (0.75 km2)
Population
 (2010) [2]
  Total6,069
  Estimate 
(2018) [3]
5,896
  Density776.1/sq mi (299.7/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
54981
Area code(s) 715 & 534
FIPS code 55-84375
Website www.cityofwaupaca.org
Looking north at Waupaca during sesquicentennial celebration on May 5, 2007 WaupacaWisconsinDowntownDuringSesquicentennial.jpg
Looking north at Waupaca during sesquicentennial celebration on May 5, 2007
Looking south at downtown Waupaca in 1908 WaupacaWisconsinDowntown1908.jpg
Looking south at downtown Waupaca in 1908

Waupaca is a city in and the county seat of Waupaca County in the state of Wisconsin, United States. The population was 6,069 at the 2010 census. The city is believed to be named after Sam Waupaca (or Chief Wapuka) of the Potowatomi tribe.

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in Canada, China, Romania, Taiwan and the United States. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.

Waupaca County, Wisconsin U.S. county in Wisconsin, United States

Waupaca County is a county in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2010 census, the population was 52,410. The county seat is Waupaca. The county was created in 1851 and organized in 1853. It is named after the Waupaca River, a Menominee language name meaning 'white sand bottom', 'pale water', or 'tomorrow river'.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders.

Contents

The city is located mostly within the Town of Waupaca, and it is politically independent of the town. A portion extends west into the adjacent Town of Farmington, and there is also a noncontiguous area of the city in the Town of Lind to the south. The city is divided into natural areas, city areas, and industrial areas.

Waupaca (town), Wisconsin Town in Wisconsin, United States

Waupaca is a town in Waupaca County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 1,155 at the 2000 census. The City of Waupaca is located mostly within the town, though it is politically independent. The ghost town of Granite Quarry was also located partially in the town,

Farmington, Waupaca County, Wisconsin Town in Wisconsin, United States

Farmington is a town in Waupaca County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 4,148 at the 2000 census. The town includes the census-designated place known as King, and the unincorporated communities of Cobb Town, and Sheridan. The census-designated place of Chain O' Lakes is also located partially in the town.

Lind, Wisconsin Town in Wisconsin, United States

Lind is a town in Waupaca County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 1,381 at the 2000 census. The unincorporated community of Lind Center is located in the town. The ghost town of Hatton was also located in the town.

History

Native American mound builders lived in the area prior to European settlement. At one time there were 72 earthwork mounds in the area, some of them ancient prehistoric works. [4]

Indigenous peoples of the Americas Pre-Columbian inhabitants of North, Central and South America and their descendants

The indigenous peoples of the Americas are the Pre-Columbian peoples of North, Central and South America and their descendants.

Before the 19th century, this area was occupied by the historic Menominee and Potowatomi tribes, both of whom spoke Algonquian languages. They had long traded with French colonists who traveled here from New France (Quebec).

Menominee Indian tribe in Wisconsin, USA

The Menominee are a federally recognized nation of Native Americans, with a 353.894 sq mi (916.581 km2) reservation in Wisconsin. Their historic territory originally included an estimated 10 million acres (40,000 km2) in present-day Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The tribe currently has about 8,700 members.

Algonquian languages subfamily of Native American languages

The Algonquian languages are a subfamily of American indigenous languages which includes most of the languages in the Algic language family. The name of the Algonquian language family is distinguished from the orthographically similar Algonquin dialect of the indigenous Ojibwe language (Chippewa), which is a senior member of the Algonquian language family. The term "Algonquin" has been suggested to derive from the Maliseet word elakómkwik, "they are our relatives/allies". A number of Algonquian languages, like many other Native American languages, are now extinct.

European Americans began to settle here in the mid-19th century as part of their westward movement from New England and New York, sometimes after settling for a period in Ohio or Indiana. In June 1849 Capt. Augustus Hill Sr. and his sons settled at a small waterfall along the Waupaca River, beginning what became known as the city of Waupaca. The settlement was named either for the Menominee term waubuck seba, meaning "pale water", or after Sam Wapuka, a local Potowatomi man who was also known as Chief Waupaca. [5]

Waupaca was incorporated as a village on May 4, 1857 by an act of the Wisconsin State Legislature. [6] This act was repealed on April 7, 1862, [7] but revived on June 17 of the same year. [8] Waupaca was incorporated as a city by the legislature on March 5, 1875. [9]

Beginning in the 1960s and continuing to the present, the city has expanded its population and area through annexation.

Geography

Waupaca is located at 44°21′17″N89°4′54″W / 44.35472°N 89.08167°W / 44.35472; -89.08167 (44.354922, -89.081775). [10]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 8.11 square miles (21.00 km2), of which, 7.82 square miles (20.25 km2) is land and 0.29 square miles (0.75 km2) is water. [1]

Transportation

US 10.svg
U.S. 10 Eastbound US 10 routes to Appleton. Westbound, US 10 routes to Stevens Point.
WIS 22.svg
WIS 22 travels north to Clintonville and south to Wild Rose.
WIS 49.svg
WIS 49 routes northbound to Iola. Southbound, it runs concurrent with US 10 and routes to Berlin.
WIS 54.svg
WIS 54 travels east to New London and west to Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.

From 1899 to 1926, streetcar service was provided by the Waupaca Electric Light and Railway Company.

Airport

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 1,392
1890 2,12752.8%
1900 2,91236.9%
1910 2,789−4.2%
1920 2,8391.8%
1930 3,13110.3%
1940 3,45810.4%
1950 3,92113.4%
1960 3,9841.6%
1970 4,3429.0%
1980 4,4723.0%
1990 4,95710.8%
2000 5,67614.5%
2010 6,0696.9%
Est. 20185,896 [3] −2.9%
U.S. Decennial Census [11]

2010 census

As of the census [2] of 2010, there were 6,069 people, 2,702 households, and 1,356 families residing in the city. The population density was 776.1 inhabitants per square mile (299.7/km2). There were 2,996 housing units at an average density of 383.1 per square mile (147.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.6% White, 0.9% African American, 0.7% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 1.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.3% of the population.

There were 2,702 households of which 25.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 34.9% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 49.8% were non-families. 42.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 20.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.10 and the average family size was 2.92.

The median age in the city was 40.1 years. 22.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.7% were from 25 to 44; 24.6% were from 45 to 64; and 20.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.5% male and 52.5% female.

2000 census

At the 2000 census, [12] there were 5,676 people, 2,364 households and 1,302 families residing in the city. The population density was 947.0 per square mile (365.9/km²). There were 2,543 housing units at an average density of 424.3 per square mile (163.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.26% White, 0.33% Black or African American, 0.86% Native American, 0.25% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.39% from other races, and 0.88% from two or more races. 3.42% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,364 households of which 29.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.5% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.9% were non-families. 38.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 3.01.

Age distribution was 25.4% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 27.0% from 25 to 44, 17.9% from 45 to 64, and 20.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 88.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.9 males.

The median household income was $31,095, and the median family income was $45,128. Males had a median income of $32,488 versus $21,651 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,890. About 7.1% of families and 10.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.9% of those under age 18 and 12.0% of those age 65 or over.

Business and industry

The Waupaca Foundry is the largest employer in the city, employing over 1500 workers in three plants in or around the city. Most of the employees live within 20 miles (32 km) of the city. [13] Gusmer Enterprises, Inc., with a manufacturing plant on Ware Street, produces products for the food and beverage, industrial and pharmaceutical markets. [14]

Notable people

Images

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Fremont is a town in Waupaca County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 632 at the 2000 census. The village of Fremont is located within the town. The unincorporated community of Red Banks is located in the town.

Fremont, Wisconsin Village in Wisconsin, United States

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Weyauwega, Wisconsin City in Wisconsin, United States

Weyauwega is a city in Waupaca County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 1,900 at the 2010 census. The city is located mostly within the Town of Weyauwega, though it is politically independent of the town. Small portions extend north into the adjacent Town of Royalton. The city is commonly referred to as "Wega" by local residents. The name "Weyauwega" means "Here we rest" because the town's origin was a stopping/resting point between two rivers when Indians had to portage their canoes. A fur trader built a small building at the location, from which the town later grew.

References

  1. 1 2 "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2012-11-18.Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  2. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2012-11-18.
  3. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved September 8, 2019.
  4. "History of Waupaca". Waupaca Area Chamber of Commerce. Archived from the original on August 4, 2009. Retrieved 2010-01-08.Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  5. City of Waupaca. History of Waupaca.
  6. Private and Local Laws of the State of Wisconsin, 1857, chapter 264 http://sos.nmtvault.com/pdf/THEOSOS_025/images/00013923.pdf
  7. Private and Local Laws of the State of Wisconsin, 1862, chapter 321 http://sos.nmtvault.com/pdf/THEOSOS_025/images/00013924.pdf
  8. Id., chapter 365 http://sos.nmtvault.com/pdf/THEOSOS_025/images/00013924.pdf
  9. An Act to incorporate the city of Waupaca
  10. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  11. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  12. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  13. "City of Waupaca Economic Development". City of Waupaca. Retrieved 2012-08-05.

Further reading