Wauseon, Ohio

Last updated
Wauseon, Ohio
Downtown Wauseon, Ohio.jpg
Buildings in downtown Wauseon
Motto(s): 
A City You'll Take To Heart
OHMap-doton-Wauseon.png
Location of Wauseon, Ohio
Map of Fulton County Ohio Highlighting Wauseon City.png
Location of Wauseon in Fulton County
Coordinates: 41°33′8″N84°8′21″W / 41.55222°N 84.13917°W / 41.55222; -84.13917 Coordinates: 41°33′8″N84°8′21″W / 41.55222°N 84.13917°W / 41.55222; -84.13917
Country Flag of the United States.svg  USA
State Flag of Ohio.svg  Ohio
County Fulton
Township Clinton
Government
   Mayor Kathy Huner [1]
Area
[2]
  Total5.19 sq mi (13.44 km2)
  Land5.17 sq mi (13.39 km2)
  Water0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation
[3]
771 ft (235 m)
Population
 (2010) [4]
  Total7,332
  Estimate 
(2018 [5] )
7,425
  Density1,418.2/sq mi (547.6/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
43567
Area code(s) 419 and 567
FIPS code 39-81928 [6]
GNIS feature ID1047628 [3]
Website www.cityofwauseon.com

Wauseon is a city in and the county seat of Fulton County, Ohio, United States [7] approximately 31 mi (51 km) west of Toledo. The population was 7,332 at the 2010 census.

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in Canada, China, Romania, Taiwan and the United States. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.

Fulton County, Ohio County in the United States

Fulton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio west of Toledo. As of the 2010 census, the population was 42,698. Its county seat is Wauseon. The county was created in 1850 with land from Henry, Lucas, and Williams counties and is named for Robert Fulton, inventor of the steamboat.

Ohio State of the United States of America

Ohio is a Midwestern state in the Great Lakes region of the United States. Of the fifty states, it is the 34th largest by area, the seventh most populous, and the tenth most densely populated. The state's capital and largest city is Columbus.

Contents

History

Wauseon was platted 1853 when the Michigan Southern Air Railway was extended to that point [8] . Land speculators bought 160 acres of land, which would become the City of Wauseon. [9] The original name for the city was "Litchfield" after Litchfield, New York, where many of the city's new settlers had emigrated from. [10] However, Hortensia Hayes, the daughter of an early settler, suggested that the new village be named after an Ottawa Tribe Chief named Wauseon, who was forced by the federal government to forfeit their land, before moving to Oklahoma in 1839. [11] The village was incorporated in 1859. With the commercial success that the railroad brought, Wauseon would grow larger than the original seat of Fulton County (Ottokee), and in 1869 Wauseon was named the county seat. [12] The Fulton County Courthouse was built in 1871. The construction of the Ohio Turnpike in the mid 20th century also helped lead to the commercial growth of Wauseon. [13]

Plat scale map showing the divisions of a piece of land

In the United States, a plat is a map, drawn to scale, showing the divisions of a piece of land. United States General Land Office surveyors drafted township plats of Public Lands Surveys to show the distance and bearing between section corners, sometimes including topographic or vegetation information. City, town or village plats show subdivisions into blocks with streets and alleys. Further refinement often splits blocks into individual lots, usually for the purpose of selling the described lots; this has become known as subdivision.

Fulton County Courthouse (Ohio) local government building in the United States

The Fulton County Courthouse, built in 1870, is a historic courthouse building located in Wauseon, Ohio. On May 7, 1973, it was added to the National Register.

Geography

Wauseon is located at 41°33′8″N84°8′21″W / 41.55222°N 84.13917°W / 41.55222; -84.13917 (41.552230, -84.139126). [16]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.19 square miles (13.44 km2), of which 5.17 square miles (13.39 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water. [2]

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1860 378
1870 1,474289.9%
1880 1,90529.2%
1890 2,0608.1%
1900 2,1484.3%
1910 2,65023.4%
1920 3,03514.5%
1930 2,889−4.8%
1940 3,0164.4%
1950 3,49415.8%
1960 4,31123.4%
1970 4,93214.4%
1980 6,17025.1%
1990 6,3222.5%
2000 7,09112.2%
2010 7,3323.4%
Est. 20187,425 [5] 1.3%
Sources: [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [6] [22]

2010 census

As of the census [4] of 2010, there were 7,332 people, 2,798 households, and 1,939 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,418.2 inhabitants per square mile (547.6/km2). There were 3,061 housing units at an average density of 592.1 per square mile (228.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.3% White, 0.9% African American, 0.3% Native American, 1.0% Asian, 5.2% from other races, and 2.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.2% of the population.

Census Acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. This term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practice.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

There were 2,798 households of which 38.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.4% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 30.7% were non-families. 26.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.10.

The median age in the city was 35.4 years. 28.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.6% were from 25 to 44; 24.5% were from 45 to 64; and 13.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.9% male and 52.1% female.

2000 census

As of the census [6] of 2000, there were 7,091 people, 2,706 households, and 1,875 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,437.6 people per square mile (555.3/km²). There were 2,851 housing units at an average density of 578.0 per square mile (223.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 92.77% White, 0.55% African American, 0.37% Native American, 0.82% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 4.02% from other races, and 1.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.79% of the population.

There were 2,706 households out of which 37.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.0% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.7% were non-families. 26.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the city the population was spread out with 29.1% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 20.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 88.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $39,591, and the median income for a family was $48,981. Males had a median income of $32,645 versus $24,042 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,491. About 3.9% of families and 5.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.5% of those under age 18 and 1.7% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Schools

Wauseon Exempted Village School District operates four schools within the city: a primary school, elementary school, middle school, and Wauseon High School. [23]

Library

The library was originally funded by tycoon and entrepreneur Andrew Carnegie in 1906. [24] In 2005, the library loaned more than 238,000 items to its 20,000 cardholders. Total holdings in 2005 were over 91,000 volumes with over 210 periodical subscriptions. From 2016-2017 the library underwent a major renovation, fixing the crumbling foundation of the library building. The library temporarily moved out to the former location of Bill's Lockeroom on Shoop Avenue until mid April 2017 before moving back in to the original library building on Elm Street. [25] [26]

Medical care

Fulton County Health Center is a rural critical access hospital that includes an emergency department with a heliport for medical evacuation.

Parks and attractions

Westbound Wabash Cannonball Trail, Rotary Park, Wauseon, Ohio Westbound Wabash Cannonball Trail, Rotary Park, Wauseon, Ohio.JPG
Westbound Wabash Cannonball Trail, Rotary Park, Wauseon, Ohio

Notable people

Media

Print

Fulton County Expositor, a paper of Ohio Community Media [34]

Television

INTV-Channel 5 [35]

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References

  1. "MAYOR'S OFFICE". City of Wauseon, OH. Retrieved 22 December 2015.
  2. 1 2 "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-24. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  3. 1 2 "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  5. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 16, 2019.
  6. 1 2 3 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  7. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
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  10. "race | Wauseon Remembers". Wauseon Downtown Association. Retrieved 2019-01-07.
  11. "race | Wauseon Remembers". Wauseon Downtown Association. Retrieved 2019-01-07.
  12. Aldrich, Lewis Cass (1888). History of Henry and Fulton counties, Ohio : with illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers. Syracuse, N. Y.: D. Mason & Co., Publishers. pp. 288–289.
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  14. Railroad & township map of Ohio (Map). Library of Congress. 1851. Retrieved 11 April 2016.
  15. J. A. Norton, Ohio commissioner of railroads & telegraphs (1890). Railroad map of Ohio (Map). Retrieved 11 April 2016.
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  22. "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 17 June 2013. Retrieved 25 November 2013.
  23. "Homepage". Wauseon Exempted Village Schools. Retrieved 25 February 2018.
  24. http://www.wauseonlibrary.org/about-us.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  25. http://www.wauseonlibrary.org/tags/library-renovation.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  26. "2005 Ohio Public Library Statistics:Statistics by County and Town". State Library of Ohio. Archived from the original on 2006-09-24. Retrieved November 10, 2006.
  27. Design, Chief Web. "Shelter House Rental & Park Information - City of Wauseon". www.cityofwauseon.com. Retrieved 2018-01-29.
  28. "52-acre park is dedicated in Wauseon". The Blade. 2009-06-02. Retrieved 2018-01-29.
  29. Scheuer, Sonja. "Bash History". www.midwestgeobash.org. Archived from the original on 2018-04-21. Retrieved 2018-04-20.
  30. http://www.wauseonnationalmeet.org/
  31. "Sterlina The Cow - Roadside Wonders". roadsidewonders.net. Retrieved 2018-01-29.
  32. "Barney Oldfield - Ohio History Central". www.ohiohistorycentral.org. Retrieved 2019-01-07.
  33. Wauseon High School 2007 Athletic Hall of Fame Inductees. (n.d.). Retrieved December 4, 2007, from http://www.wauseon.k12.oh.us/Hall_of_Fame/Rick%20Volk.pdf
  34. http://fcnews.org/
  35. http://intv5.com/schedule.htm