Wauters Point

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Wauters Point ( 64°6′S61°43′W / 64.100°S 61.717°W / -64.100; -61.717 Coordinates: 64°6′S61°43′W / 64.100°S 61.717°W / -64.100; -61.717 ) is an ice-covered point forming the north end of Two Hummock Island in the Palmer Archipelago. Charted by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition, 1897–99, under Gerlache, and named by him for Alphonse Wauters, a supporter of the expedition.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Two Hummock Island

Two Hummock Island is an ice-covered island, 9.4 kilometres (6 mi) long in a north-south direction, conspicuous for its two rocky summits Buache Peak and Modev Peak 670 metres high, lying 9.6 kilometres southeast of Liège Island and 11.5 kilometres east of Brabant Island in the Palmer Archipelago. This name has appeared on maps for over 100 years and its usage has become established internationally.

Palmer Archipelago Group of islands off the northwestern coast of the Antarctic Peninsula

Palmer Archipelago, also known as Antarctic Archipelago, Archipiélago Palmer, Antarktiske Arkipel or Palmer Inseln, is a group of islands off the northwestern coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. It extends from Tower Island in the north to Anvers Island in the south. It is separated by the Gerlache and Bismarck straits from the Antarctic Peninsula and Wilhelm Archipelago, respectively.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Wauters Point" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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