Wauwermans Islands

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Wauwermans Islands
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Wauwermans Islands
Location in Antarctica
Geography
Location Antarctica
Coordinates 64°55′S63°53′W / 64.917°S 63.883°W / -64.917; -63.883 Coordinates: 64°55′S63°53′W / 64.917°S 63.883°W / -64.917; -63.883
Archipelago Wilhelm Archipelago
Administration
Administered under the Antarctic Treaty System
Demographics
PopulationUninhabited

Wauwermans Islands is a group of small, low, snow-covered islands forming the northernmost group in the Wilhelm Archipelago. Discovered by a German expedition 1873-74, under Dallmann. Sighted by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition, 1897–99, under Gerlache, and named for Lieutenant General Wauwermans, president of the Société Royale Belge de Géographie, a supporter of the expedition.

Wilhelm Archipelago

The Wilhelm Archipelago is an island archipelago off the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula in Antarctica.

Belgian Antarctic Expedition Late-19th century Antarctic expedition

The Belgian Antarctic Expedition of 1897 to 1899 was the first expedition to winter in the Antarctic region.

The Société Royale Belge de Géographie or SRBG, is a Belgian learned society which works to promote geographical sciences.

Islands in group

Brown Island in the Antarctic is a small, brown, almost snow-free island in the southeastern part of the Wauwermans Islands, 2 nautical miles (4 km) southwest of Wednesday Island, in the Wilhelm Archipelago. It was charted by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill, 1934–37, and so named because its brown color distinguished it from adjacent snow-capped islands.

Friar Island is an island lying immediately northeast of Manciple Island in the Wauwermans Islands, in the Wilhelm Archipelago. It was shown on an Argentine government chart of 1952, but not named. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1958 after The Friar, one of the characters in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

Guido Island is an island lying 1 nautical mile (2 km) northeast of Prioress Island in the Wauwermans Islands, in the Wilhelm Archipelago, Antarctica. It was shown on an Argentine government chart of 1950; the name "Isla Guido Spano" appears on a 1957 chart and is for Carlos Guido Spano (1829–1918), a famous Argentine poet.

See also

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Wauwermans Islands" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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Wednesday Island island in Antarctica

Wednesday Island is an island 1 nautical mile long, at the east end of Wauwermans Islands in the north part of Wilhelm Archipelago, Antarctica. The Wauwermans Islands were discovered by the German expedition under Eduard Dallmann, 1873–74, and were later roughly mapped by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition under Gerlache, 1897–99, and the French Antarctic Expedition under Charcot, 1903-05. Wednesday Island was charted by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE), 1934–37, under John Rymill, and so named because it was first sighted on a Wednesday.

Melchior Islands group of many low, ice-covered islands

The Melchior Islands are a group of many low, ice-covered islands lying near the center of Dallmann Bay in the Palmer Archipelago, Antarctica. They were first seen but left unnamed by a German expedition under Eduard Dallmann, 1873–74. The islands were resighted and roughly charted by the Third French Antarctic Expedition under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, 1903–05. Charcot named what he believed to be the large easternmost island in the group "Île Melchior" after Vice Admiral Jules Melchior of the French Navy, but later surveys proved Charcot's Île Melchior to be two islands, now called Eta Island and Omega Island. The name Melchior Islands has since become established for the whole island group now described, of which Eta Island and Omega Island form the eastern part, while the Sigma Islands mark the northern limit of the islands. The group was roughly surveyed in 1927 by Discovery Investigations personnel in the RRS Discovery, and was resurveyed by Argentine expeditions in 1942 and 1943, and again in 1948.

Lambda Island

Lambda Island is an island lying immediately north-west of Delta Island in the Melchior Islands, of the Palmer Archipelago in Antarctica. The island, the largest in the north-western part of the island group, was first roughly charted and named "Île Sourrieu" by the French Antarctic Expedition, 1903–05 under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, but that name has not survived in usage. The current name, derived from lambda, the 11th letter of the Greek alphabet, was given by Discovery Investigations personnel who roughly charted the island in 1927. The island was surveyed by Argentine expeditions in 1942, 1943 and 1948.

Anagram Islands

The Anagram Islands are a group of small islands and rocks lying between Roca Islands and Argentine Islands, in the Wilhelm Archipelago, Antarctica. The area was charted by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition under Adrien de Gerlache, 1897–99, the French Antarctic Expedition under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, 1903–05 and 1908–10, and the British Graham Land Expedition under John Riddoch Rymill, 1934–37. The names Argentine, Roca and Cruls were variously applied to the four island groups on the south side of French Passage. The islands were mapped in detail by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey from photos taken from the helicopter of HMS Protector and from information obtained by the British Naval Hydrographic Survey Unit in 1958, and the three names positioned as originally given by the Belgian and French expeditions. The remaining island group was named Anagram Islands by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1959, anagram meaning a transposition of parts.

Butler Passage is a passage between the Wauwermans Islands and the Puzzle Islands, connecting Peltier Channel and Lemaire Channel, off the west coast of Graham Land. The route was probably first used by the French Antarctic Expedition under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, 1903–05 and 1908–10, on their trips between Port Lockroy and Booth Island. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1959 for Captain Adrian R.L. Butler, Royal Navy, captain of the British naval guardship HMS Protector which was in this area in 1957–58 and 1958–59.

Dannebrog Islands

The Dannebrog Islands are a group of islands and rocks lying between the Wauwermans Islands and the Vedel Islands in the Wilhelm Archipelago.

Gourdin Island

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Moss Islands

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Lobel Island is an island nearly 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) long, laying 2 nautical miles (4 km) southwest of Brown Island in the Wauwermans Islands of the Wilhelm Archipelago, Antarctica. It was charted by the Third French Antarctic Expedition under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, 1903–05, and named for Loicq de Lobel.

Manciple Island is an island lying between Reeve Island and Host Island in the Wauwermans Islands, in the Wilhelm Archipelago of Antarctica. It was shown on an Argentine government chart of 1952. The island was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1958 after the Manciple, one of the characters in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

Squire Island

Squire Island is a small island lying immediately northeast of Friar Island in the Wauwermans Islands, in the Wilhelm Archipelago. Shown on an Argentine government chart of 1950. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1958 after one of the characters in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

Host Island is an island lying immediately southeast of Manciple Island in the Wauwermans Islands, in the Wilhelm Archipelago, Antarctica. It was shown on an Argentine government chart of 1950. The island was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1958 after The Host, one of the characters in Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

Reeve Island is an island 1.5 nautical miles long, lying between Knight and Friar islands in the Wauwermans Islands, in the Wilhelm Archipelago. Shown on an Argentine government chart of 1950. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1958 after one of the characters in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

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