Wave Peak

Last updated

Wave Peak is a conspicuous peak, 960 m, which rises precipitously from the head of Laws Glacier in the central part of Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands. The feature has a prominent ridge running in a southwesterly direction. To the north and east it slopes gently to the level of Brisbane Heights. Surveyed in 1948-49 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), and so named by them because of the resemblance of this peak to a wave about to break.

Laws Glacier

Laws Glacier is a confluent glacier system which flows into Marshall Bay on the south coast of Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands off Antarctica. It was surveyed in 1948–49 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Richard M. Laws of the FIDS, leader and biologist at Signy Research Station in 1948 and 1949, and at South Georgia in 1951.

Coronation Island island in South Orkney Islands

Coronation Island is the largest of the South Orkney Islands, 25 nautical miles (46 km) long and from 3 to 8 nautical miles wide. The island extends in a general east-west direction, is mainly ice-covered and comprises numerous bays, glaciers and peaks, the highest rising to 1,265 metres (4,150 ft).

South Orkney Islands A group of islands in the Southern Ocean north-east of the Antarctic Peninsula

The South Orkney Islands are a group of islands in the Southern Ocean, about 604 kilometres (375 mi) north-east of the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula and 844 kilometres (524 mi) south-west of South Georgia Island. They have a total area of about 620 square kilometres (240 sq mi). The islands are claimed both by Britain, and by Argentina as part of Argentine Antarctica. Under the 1959 Antarctic Treaty, sovereignty claims are held in abeyance.

Related Research Articles

Andreaea Plateau is a small plateau with an average elevation of 180 metres (590 ft), located southwest of Robin Peak, Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands. The feature is notable for the largest known stand in the Antarctic of the black-brown moss Andreaea.

Beagle Peak

Beagle Peak is a peak rising to about 700 metres (2,300 ft) in the central part of the Lassus Mountains, Alexander Island, Antarctica. It is situated 5.55 km west by south of Moriseni Peak. The feature was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Commander Clyde A. Beagle, U.S. Navy, LC-130 aircraft commander, Squadron VXE-6, U.S. Navy Operation Deepfreeze, 1969 and 1970.

Borge Bay is a small bay between Balin Point and Berntsen Point on the east side of Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands. It was charted in 1912 by Norwegian whaling captain Petter Sorlle, and named for Captain Hans Borge, master of the Polynesia, who undertook additional mapping of the bay during the following year.

Cleft Point is a headland on the east side of Norway Bight on the south coast of Coronation Island, South Orkney Islands. The point marks the western extremity of an island which is separated from Coronation Island by a narrow channel, but it was mapped by Discovery Investigations in 1933 as a point on Coronation Island itself. The descriptive name alludes to the narrow separation from the main island and was given by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey following their survey of 1950.

Cockscomb Buttress is a prominent, isolated rock buttress rising to 465 metres (1,530 ft), standing 1 nautical mile (2 km) northwest of Echo Mountain and overlooking the east side of Norway Bight on the south coast of Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands. The name, which is descriptive, was given by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey following their survey of 1950.

Coldblow Col is a snow-covered col at 300 metres (1,000 ft) elevation, between Echo Mountain and the Cragsman Peaks on Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands. It was surveyed in 1950 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). The name derives from the fact that a FIDS party had their tent blown down in a gale when camped on this col in September 1948.

Norway Bight

Norway Bight is a bay 4 nautical miles (7 km) wide indenting the south coast of Coronation Island between Meier Point and Mansfield Point, in the South Orkney Islands. The name appears on a chart by Petter Sorlle, Norwegian whaling captain who made a running survey of the South Orkney Islands in 1912-13.

Waterpipe Beach is a flat shingle beach on the west side of Borge Bay, Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands. Surveyed in 1933 by DI personnel. Resurveyed and named in 1947 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). An old pipe line from a pumping station by Pumphouse Lake, the southernmost lake in Three Lakes Valley, leads down to this beach and was used by the Tonsberg Hvalfangeri for watering whaling vessels during the period 1920-30.

Crown Head is a headland forming the east side of Palmer Bay on the north coast of Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands. It was first seen in the course of the joint cruise by Captain George Powell, a British sealer, and Captain Nathaniel Palmer, an American sealer, in December 1821. It was surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1956–58. The name derives from an association with Coronation Island and was given by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1959.

Knife Point is a point along the south side of Borge Bay, 0.1 nautical miles (0.2 km) southeast of Mooring Point, on the east side of Signy Island in the South Orkney Islands. The name appears on a chart based on a 1927 survey of Borge Bay by Discovery Investigations personnel on the Discovery, but may reflect an earlier naming.

Stygian Cove is a cove immediately west of Berry Head in the north part of Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands. On its west side steep rock cliffs rise to Robin Peak. Roughly surveyed in 1912–13 by Petter Sørlle, Norwegian whaling captain, and again in 1933 by DI personnel. Resurveyed and named in 1947 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). The cove was named because it is so overshadowed by the cliffs of Robin Peak that a sense of stygian gloom is felt.

Moraine Valley is a valley filled with morainic debris, 0.75 nautical miles (1.4 km) long, which drains north into Elephant Flats on the east side of Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands off Antarctica. In summer a stream, fed by the ice slopes at its south end, runs in this valley. It was named by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey following their survey of 1947.

The Moss Braes are west-facing slopes (braes) situated west of Robin Peak on Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands off Antarctica. They were named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1990 from the extensive moss banks on the dissected rocky slopes.

Meridian Glacier is a broad glacier, 9 nautical miles (17 km) long, which flows south along the west side of Godfrey Upland and joins Clarke Glacier between Behaim Peak and Elton Hill, in southern Graham Land, Antarctica. Finn Ronne and Carl R. Eklund of the United States Antarctic Service travelled along this glacier in January 1941. It was photographed from the air by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition in November 1947, and was surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in December 1958. The glacier was so named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee because the glacier flows from north to south along the meridian.

Sandefjord Peaks is a set of three conical peaks, the highest 635 m, marking the southwest end of Pomona Plateau at the west end of Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands. The southernmost of these peaks was named Sandefjord Peak after nearby Sandefjord Bay by DI personnel in 1933. The collective name, Sandefjord Peaks, was recommended by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) following a survey of the peaks by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1950.

Starfish Cove is a small cove close north of Balin Point on the east side of Signy Island in the South Orkney Islands. Roughly surveyed in 1933 by DI personnel. So named by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), following their survey of 1947, because of the large number of starfish in the bottom fauna.

Tern Cove is a small cove, the entrance to which is blocked by submerged rocks, lying immediately southeast of Berry Head in the north part of Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands. The cove contains three small islands, and an area near the head dries at low water. Roughly charted in 1933 by DI personnel. Named by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), following their survey of 1947, for the colony of terns on the southernmost island in the cove.

Robin Peak is a sharply defined rocky summit which is the northernmost peak on Signy Island in the South Orkney Islands. It was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1954 for Gordon de Quetteville Robin of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), the leader at Signy Island base in 1947, who made the first detailed survey of the island.

Lenton Point

Lenton Point is the southwestern extremity of a small, rocky peninsula in Clowes Bay on the south side of Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands off Antarctica. It was roughly surveyed in 1933 by Discovery Investigations personnel, and resurveyed in 1947 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). It was named in 1954 by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Ralph A. Lenton of the FIDS, a radio operator at Signy Island base in 1948, who helped with the survey and biological work. Lenton subsequently worked at Admiralty Bay in 1949, and was leader at Deception Island in 1951, at Port Lockroy in 1952 and at the Argentine Islands in 1954.

Limestone Valley is a valley extending northwest from Cemetery Bay, Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands. The valley leads directly to Jane Col and serves as a route to the west coast of the island. It was so named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee because of an exposure of limestone in the cliff above the valley.

References

    PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Wave Peak" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

    United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

    The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

    Geographic Names Information System geographical database

    The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.

    Coordinates: 60°37′S45°36′W / 60.617°S 45.600°W / -60.617; -45.600

    Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

    A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.