Waveform buffer

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In computing, a waveform buffer is a technique for digital synthesis of repeating waveforms. It is common in PC sound cards.

Computing Activity that uses computers

Computing is any activity that uses computers to manage, process, and communicate information for various purposes. It includes development of both hardware and software. Computing is a critical, integral component of modern industrial technology. Major computing disciplines include computer engineering, software engineering, computer science, information systems, and information technology.

Repeating waveforms is a technique for digital synthesis common in PC sound cards.

Personal computer Computer intended for use by an individual person

A personal computer (PC) is a multi-purpose computer whose size, capabilities, and price make it feasible for individual use. Personal computers are intended to be operated directly by an end user, rather than by a computer expert or technician. Unlike large costly minicomputer and mainframes, time-sharing by many people at the same time is not used with personal computers.

The waveform amplitude values are stored in a buffer memory, which is addressed from a phase generator, with the retrieved value then used as the basis of the synthesized signal. In the phase generator, a value proportional to the desired signal frequence is periodically added to an accumulator. The high order bits of the accumulator form the output address, while the typically larger number of bits in the accumulator and addition value results in an arbitrarily high frequency resolution. [1]

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References

  1. "Using the Waveform Buffer".