Waverly Glacier

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Waverly Glacier ( 74°1′S61°38′W / 74.017°S 61.633°W / -74.017; -61.633 Coordinates: 74°1′S61°38′W / 74.017°S 61.633°W / -74.017; -61.633 ) is a narrow glacier flowing along the south flank of Mount Tricorn and entering Wright Inlet, on the east coast of Palmer Land. This glacier was photographed from the air by members of the United States Antarctic Service (USAS) in December 1940, and by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE) under Ronne in 1947. Named by Ronne after Waverly, New York City, home of the Kasco Mills. Mr. Marc Ivy and Mr. Edwin Knapp, officers of the Kasco Mills, contributed twenty tons of dog food to Ronne's expedition.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Glacier Persistent body of ice that is moving under its own weight

A glacier is a persistent body of dense ice that is constantly moving under its own weight; it forms where the accumulation of snow exceeds its ablation over many years, often centuries. Glaciers slowly deform and flow due to stresses induced by their weight, creating crevasses, seracs, and other distinguishing features. They also abrade rock and debris from their substrate to create landforms such as cirques and moraines. Glaciers form only on land and are distinct from the much thinner sea ice and lake ice that form on the surface of bodies of water.

Mount Tricorn is a distinctive massif whose vertical rock faces rise to 1,120 m and surround a snow-covered interior which is lower except for a 1,610 m peak in the northwest portion, standing at the head of Wright Inlet on the east coast of Palmer Land. Discovered by members of the United States Antarctic Service (USAS) in a flight from East Base on December 30, 1940, and named for its resemblance to a gigantic tri-cornered hat.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Waverly Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.



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