Waverly Hill

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Waverly Hill

Waverly Hill entrance gateposts.jpg

Gateway to the estate
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Location 3001 N. Augusta St., Staunton, Virginia
Coordinates 38°10′11″N79°2′38″W / 38.16972°N 79.04389°W / 38.16972; -79.04389 Coordinates: 38°10′11″N79°2′38″W / 38.16972°N 79.04389°W / 38.16972; -79.04389
Area 25.7 acres (10.4 ha)
Built 1929 (1929)
Architect Bottomley, William Lawrence
Architectural style Georgian Revival
NRHP reference # 82004604 [1]
VLR # 132-0029
Significant dates
Added to NRHP July 8, 1982
Designated VLR February 16, 1982 [2]

Waverly Hill is a historic mansion located at Staunton, Virginia. It was designed by architect William Lawrence Bottomley (18831951) and built in 1929. It consists of a 2 1/2story, five-bay, center section flanked by one-story wings connected by low, one-story hyphens in the Georgian Revival style. The house is constructed of brick, and the central section and wings are topped by slate-covered hipped roofs. [3]

Staunton, Virginia Independent city in Virginia, United States

Staunton is an independent city in the U.S. Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 23,746. In Virginia, independent cities are separate jurisdictions from the counties that surround them, so the government offices of Augusta County are in Verona, which is contiguous to Staunton.

William Lawrence Bottomley, was a noted architect in twentieth-century New York City; Middleburg, Virginia; and Richmond, Virginia. He is admired as one of the preeminent Colonial Revival designers of residential buildings in the United States and many of his commissions are situated in highly aspirational locations, including Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia.

Hyphen (architecture) Architectural element

In architecture, a hyphen is a connecting link between two larger building elements. It is typically found in Palladian architecture, where the hyphens form connections between a large corps de logis and terminating pavilions.

It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Retrieved 19 March 2013.
  3. William T. Frazier (n.d.). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Waverly Hill" (PDF). Virginia Department of Historic Resources. and Accompanying photo