Waverly Township, Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania

Last updated
Waverly Township
Abington Township
Township (Pennsylvania)

Waverly, Pennsylvania.jpg

Waverly Community Church, located on Clinton St. (PA 632)
Pennsylvania in United States (US48).svg
Location of Pennsylvania in the United States
Coordinates: 41°31′00″N75°41′59″W / 41.51667°N 75.69972°W / 41.51667; -75.69972 Coordinates: 41°31′00″N75°41′59″W / 41.51667°N 75.69972°W / 41.51667; -75.69972
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
County Lackawanna
Area [1]
  Total 4.56 sq mi (11.81 km2)
  Land 4.55 sq mi (11.79 km2)
  Water 0.01 sq mi (0.02 km2)
Elevation 1,217 ft (371 m)
Population (2010)undefined
  Estimate (2016) [2] 1,705
  Density 374.56/sq mi (144.60/km2)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
  Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 570
FIPS code 42-069-81668
Website www.waverlytwp.org

Waverly Township is a township in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, United States. It borders Dalton and Glenburn Township to the west, North Abington Township to the north, Clarks Summit and Clarks Green to the south, South Abington Township to the south and southeast, and Scott Township to the east. Waverly Township is part of the growing suburban area known as the "Abingtons." The population was 1,743 at the 2010 census.

Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania County in Pennsylvania, United States

Lackawanna County is a county in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 214,437. Its county seat and largest city is Scranton.

Pennsylvania State of the United States of America

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern, Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware to the southeast, Maryland to the south, West Virginia to the southwest, Ohio to the west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey to the east.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Contents

Prior to 2011, the township was known as Abington Township, and originally referred to as Ebbington in Connecticut's claim in 1806. [3]

History

Waverly was founded in the late 18th century by settlers from Connecticut, along The Warriors' Path, and was originally called Abington Center. In 1853, it was established as a borough within Pennsylvania; since there was another municipality named Abington located near Philadelphia, the borough was renamed Waverly after Sir Walter Scott's novel of the same name, popular at that time. The borough, located within Lackawanna County, gave up its charter in 1920, because of the high cost to upgrade its main street to a state highway, and became Abington Township. Due to confusion between the Montgomery County township, and Lacakwanna County's North, South, and West Abington townships, township officials set up a ballot initiative to rename the municipality to Waverly based on one of its former names. On November 2, 2010, voters in the township overwhelmingly voted to change the township's name to Waverly Township, with 706 voting for the change and 115 against. The name change officially took place on January 1, 2011. [4] [5]

Connecticut state of the United States of America

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the United States. As of the 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index (0.962), and median household income in the United States. It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, New York to the west, and Long Island Sound to the south. Its capital is Hartford and its most populous city is Bridgeport. It is part of New England, although portions of it are often grouped with New York and New Jersey as the Tri-state area. The state is named for the Connecticut River which approximately bisects the state. The word "Connecticut" is derived from various anglicized spellings of an Algonquian word for "long tidal river".

Abington Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania Township in Pennsylvania, United States

Abington Township is a township in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, United States, adjacent to Philadelphia's northern fringe. The population was 55,310 as of the 2010 census, making it the second most populous township in Montgomery County. The population density is 3603.3 per square mile, making it the second most densely populated township in Montgomery County.

Philadelphia Largest city in Pennsylvania, United States

Philadelphia, known colloquially as Philly, is the largest city in the U.S. state and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the sixth-most populous U.S. city, with a 2018 census-estimated population of 1,584,138. Since 1854, the city has been coterminous with Philadelphia County, the most populous county in Pennsylvania and the urban core of the eighth-largest U.S. metropolitan statistical area, with over 6 million residents as of 2017. Philadelphia is also the economic and cultural anchor of the greater Delaware Valley, located along the lower Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis. The Delaware Valley's population of 7.2 million ranks it as the eighth-largest combined statistical area in the United States.

The earliest settlers built cabins in Waverly around 1800. The Philadelphia and Great Bend Turnpike (now Main Street) was chartered in 1919 by the Pennsylvania Legislature along The Warriors' Path. Started in 1820, this turnpike was completed in 1824. During this time, the first three houses which were not cabins were built. In 1828, the Wayside Inn was built, and the first doctor, Dr. Andrew Bedford, set up practice, and built a house which stands today on Main Street. The first general store was built in 1830, followed by a second inn and tavern in 1832. A building boom ensued during the years 1847 through 1890, during which time Waverly was a profitable small scale industrial center. 1850 through 1880 was the heyday of Waverly's industrial era. Farmers and dairymen shipped their goods to New York City; iron foundries flourished, and numerous retail establishments, including greengrocers, bakers, a drugstore, dime store, hardware store, lumberyard, and harness shops, thrived. In 1880, the railroad was laid five miles from Waverly, and the prosperity of the town faded.

During the mid-19th century, Waverly was a stop on the Underground Railroad. Escaped slaves and freedmen found a sympathetic population in Waverly, and some settled in small houses built by a local farmer and sold to them. The freedmen also built the AME Church, which is in use today as a private residence. It is one of five churches in existence in 1872, 3 of which still stand and are still active congregations.

Underground Railroad network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States during the early to mid-19th century, and used by African-American slaves to escape to freedom

The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States during the early to mid-19th century, and used by African-American slaves to escape into free states, Canada and Nova Scotia with the aid of abolitionists and allies who were sympathetic to their cause. The term is also applied to the abolitionists, both black and white, free and enslaved, who aided the fugitives. Various other routes led to Mexico or overseas. An earlier escape route running south toward Florida, then a Spanish possession, existed from the late 17th century until Florida became a United States territory in 1821. However, the network now generally known as the Underground Railroad was formed in the late 1700s, and it ran north to the free states and Canada, and reached its height between 1850 and 1860. One estimate suggests that by 1850, 100,000 slaves had escaped via the "Railroad".

The Waverly Historic District was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2004. [6]

Waverly Historic District (Waverly Township, Pennsylvania)

Waverly Historic District is a national historic district roughly centered on Academy St. and Abington Rd., inc. Carbondale Rd., Beech, Cole, Church and Dearborn St. in Waverly Township, Pennsylvania. Historic functions of the district include domestic buildings, at least one religious structure, commerce and trade, education and recreation and culture. The district was built around 1928, and is significant for its architecture. Styles include Late Victorian, Late 19th And Early 20th Century American Movements. Architects include George M.D. Lewis and Ephraim Ross.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

Fire in 1916

In the spring of 1916, a fire devastated the four downtown blocks of Waverly; only 11 businesses remained thereafter. Of those, two buildings have operating businesses in them today: The Waverly Deli and The Waverly General Store. The front two blocks were an eyesore, although summer visitors continued to come from Scranton to Waverly. The Belin Family bought the front two blocks and began design and construction of the Waverly Community House. The building was completed in 1920, and expanded to the back two blocks of the original downtown; all streets through those blocks had been removed, and the transformation of downtown to picturesque center was complete.

Waverly Community House Waverly PA Community House.jpg
Waverly Community House

The Community House (commonly referred to as "The Comm") sits at the center of Waverly. The brick Dutch colonial structure currently houses the Waverly Post Office, a gymnasium with basketball court, a public playground, a preschool program and numerous recreational and educational offerings for families with young children. The Comm also plays host to an annual home and garden show, antique fair, and concerts on the lawn. Margaretta E. Belin funded construction of The Comm as a memorial to her husband, Henry Belin Jr., after his death in 1917. On June 4, 1920, the building and a portion of the land were deeded to Abington Township for the benefit of the township's residents. Wealthy summer visitors from Scranton migrated to Waverly on a permanent basis, and the town's reputation as a white-collar bedroom community was cemented.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 4.6 square miles (11.9 km²), all of it land.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
2010 null
Est. 20161,705 [2] Expression error: Unrecognized word "null".
U.S. Decennial Census [7]

As of the census [8] of 2010, there were 1,743 people, 639 households, and 515 families residing in the township. The population density was 378.9 people per square mile (146.3/km²). There were 686 housing units at an average density of 149.1/sq mi (58.2/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 94.5% White, 0.2% African American, 3.8% Asian, 0.3% some other race, and 1.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.5% of the population.

There were 639 households, out of which 34.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.1% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.4% were non-families. 16.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the township the population was spread out, with 25.8% under the age of 18, 57.2% from 18 to 64, and 17% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.9 years.

The median income for a household in the township was $122,222, and the median income for a family was $150,221. Males had a median income of $98,036 versus $43,958 for females. The per capita income for the township was $52,653. About 2.9% of families and 3.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.4% of those under age 18 and 3.3% of those age 65 or over.

Education

The first school was started in his log cabin in 1804 by Elder Miller, the first settler in the town. The first dedicated school was built in 1830 on the Philadelphia and Great Bend Turnpike. After it ceased being used as a school, it became a private residence for many years; the Waverly Historic Society is currently planning for its renovation and use as their headquarters. In 1844, a group of investors started the Madison Academy. This was a private school which enjoyed high regard and taught a rigorous curriculum to boys and girls. Students came from all over Pennsylvania to attend the Madison Academy; some of its graduates became judges and attorneys. The tuition ranged from $2.00 to $10.00 per quarter, depending upon the grade, and the boarding house next door charged $1.25 to $1.50 per week. Following the closing of the private school in 1878, the building was used as a public school through 1925, at which time it was razed. The Belin family donated a new school building to the town that originally served all grades. The site of that school is now occupied a newer building, Waverly Elementary School, which serves Kindergarten through fourth grade and is part of the Abington Heights School District. This is currently the only public school in the township, and is where all of the elementary students in the township attend school.

The bell from the Madison Academy hangs behind Waverly Elementary, a testament to the long tradition of academic excellence in Waverly. Although the academy was razed, the house across the street from it has a bell in its attic, and is sometimes mistaken for the original Madison Academy.

All middle school students residing in Waverly Township attend Abington Heights Middle School, and high school students attend Abington Heights High School.

See also

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References

  1. "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Aug 14, 2017.
  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  3. http://www.waverlytwp.com/historical-info/ . Retrieved April 25, 2016.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  4. Nissley, Erin L. (October 28, 2010). "Voters in Abington Twp. to decide on proposed name change". Scranton Times-Tribune . Retrieved October 25, 2015.
  5. Nissley, Erin L. (November 3, 2010). "Abington changes name to Waverly". Scranton Times-Tribune. Retrieved October 25, 2015.
  6. National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  7. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2016.
  8. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2011-05-14.