Waverton school and schoolmaster's house

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Waverton school and schoolmaster's house

Waverton School.jpg

Photograph of the school and house taken about 1880
Location Waverton, Cheshire, England
Coordinates 53°09′54″N2°48′25″W / 53.1649°N 2.8069°W / 53.1649; -2.8069 Coordinates: 53°09′54″N2°48′25″W / 53.1649°N 2.8069°W / 53.1649; -2.8069
Built 1877
Built for 1st Duke of Westminster
Architect John Douglas
Listed Building – Grade II
Designated 30 January 1985
Reference no. 1330262
Cheshire UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Location in Cheshire

Waverton school and schoolmaster's house are in the village of Waverton, Cheshire, England. The combined structure is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. [1]

Waverton, Cheshire village and civil parish in Cheshire West and Chester, Cheshire, England

Waverton is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. It lies about 5 14 miles (8.4 km) south-east of Chester. It is almost continuous with the village of Rowton to the north west and that in turn is almost continuous with Christleton. According to the 2011 Census, the population of the parish was 1,587.

Cheshire County of England

Cheshire is a county in North West England, bordering Merseyside and Greater Manchester to the north, Derbyshire to the east, Staffordshire and Shropshire to the south and Flintshire, Wales and Wrexham county borough to the west. Cheshire's county town is the City of Chester (118,200); the largest town is Warrington (209,700). Other major towns include Crewe (71,722), Ellesmere Port (55,715), Macclesfield (52,044), Northwich (75,000), Runcorn (61,789), Widnes (61,464) and Winsford (32,610)

The National Heritage List for England (NHLE) is England’s official list of buildings, monuments, parks and gardens, wrecks, battlefields and World Heritage Sites. It is maintained by Historic England and brings together these different designations as a single resource even though they vary in the type of legal protection afforded to each. Conservation areas do not appear on the NHLE since they are designated by the relevant local planning authority.

Contents

History

The school and the house were built in 1877 for the 1st Duke of Westminster and designed by the Chester architect John Douglas. [1] The schoolmaster's house is still in use as a house, while the school is now a day nursery and after school club.[ citation needed ]

Hugh Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster Duke of Westminster

Hugh Lupus Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster,, styled Viscount Belgrave between 1831 and 1845 and Earl Grosvenor between 1845 and 1869 and known as The Marquess of Westminster between 1869 and 1874, was an English landowner, politician and racehorse owner. He inherited the estate of Eaton Hall in Cheshire and land in Mayfair and Belgravia, London, and spent much of his fortune in developing these properties. Although he was a member of parliament from the age of 22, and then a member of the House of Lords, his main interests were not in politics, but rather in his estates, in horse racing, and in country pursuits. He developed the stud at Eaton Hall and achieved success in racing his horses, winning the Derby on four occasions. Grosvenor also took an interest in a range of charities. At his death he was considered to be the richest man in Britain.

Chester city in Cheshire, England

Chester is a walled city in Cheshire, England, on the River Dee, close to the border with Wales. With a population of 118,200 in 2011, it is the most populous settlement of Cheshire West and Chester, which had a population of 332,200 in 2014. Chester was granted city status in 1541.

John Douglas (architect) English architect, (1830 – 1911)

John Douglas was an English architect who designed over 500 buildings in Cheshire, North Wales, and northwest England, in particular in the estate of Eaton Hall. He was trained in Lancaster and practised throughout his career from an office in Chester. Initially he ran the practice on his own, but from 1884 until two years before his death he worked in partnerships with two of his former assistants.

Architecture

School

This is constructed in red ashlar sandstone with a red tile roof. It is in one storey and its south front has five bays. Each of the central three bays has four-light mullioned and transomed window under a stone-coped gable with a finial. In the left bay is an arched doorway and in the right bay is a four-light mullioned window. The roof is hipped and contains three gabled ventilators. At the left end of the roof is a bellcote. [1]

Ashlar Finely dressed stone and associated masonry

Ashlar is finely dressed stone, either an individual stone that has been worked until squared or the structure built of it. Ashlar is the finest stone masonry unit, generally cuboid, mentioned by Vitruvius as opus isodomum, or less frequently trapezoidal. Precisely cut "on all faces adjacent to those of other stones", ashlar is capable of very thin joints between blocks, and the visible face of the stone may be quarry-faced or feature a variety of treatments: tooled, smoothly polished or rendered with another material for decorative effect.

Sandstone A clastic sedimentary rock composed mostly of sand-sized particles

Sandstone is a clastic sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-sized mineral particles or rock fragments.

Bay (architecture) space defined by the vertical piers, in a building

In architecture, a bay is the space between architectural elements, or a recess or compartment. Bay comes from Old French baee, meaning an opening or hole.

House

The house is connected to the school by a single-storey passage. It has two storeys; the lower storey is constructed in orange brick on a stone plinth, and the upper storey is timber-framed. The roof is in red tiles and there are two chimneys. The main (west) front of the house has three bays. The doorway is in the central bay; over this is an oriel window supported by wooden columns under a gable. To the left of the door is a five-light mullioned window. A pair of small outbuildings with hipped roofs are attached to the left side of the house. The south aspect of the house has a canted window in the lower storey under a jettied timber-framed upper storey supported on wooden brackets. The upper storey contains a four-light casement window with a date inscribed in the beam above it. [1]

Timber framing building technique, construction method using heavy squared-off and carefully fitted and joined timbers

Timber framing and "post-and-beam" construction are traditional methods of building with heavy timbers, creating structures using squared-off and carefully fitted and joined timbers with joints secured by large wooden pegs. It is commonplace in wooden buildings from the 19th century and earlier. If the structural frame of load-bearing timber is left exposed on the exterior of the building it may be referred to as half-timbered, and in many cases the infill between timbers will be used for decorative effect. The country most known for this kind of architecture is Germany. Timber framed houses are spread all over the country except in the southeast.

Oriel window type of bay window

An oriel window is a form of bay window which protrudes from the main wall of a building but does not reach to the ground. Supported by corbels, brackets, or similar, an oriel window is most commonly found projecting from an upper floor but is also sometimes used on the ground floor.

Column structural element sustaining the weight of a building

A column or pillar in architecture and structural engineering is a structural element that transmits, through compression, the weight of the structure above to other structural elements below. In other words, a column is a compression member. The term column applies especially to a large round support with a capital and a base or pedestal which is made of stone, or appearing to be so. A small wooden or metal support is typically called a post, and supports with a rectangular or other non-round section are usually called piers. For the purpose of wind or earthquake engineering, columns may be designed to resist lateral forces. Other compression members are often termed "columns" because of the similar stress conditions. Columns are frequently used to support beams or arches on which the upper parts of walls or ceilings rest. In architecture, "column" refers to such a structural element that also has certain proportional and decorative features. A column might also be a decorative element not needed for structural purposes; many columns are "engaged", that is to say form part of a wall.

Critique

Douglas designed schools for other estate villages, including Aldford, Dodleston and Eccleston. Like Eccleston school, Waverton school is built in close proximity to the schoolmaster's house. In each case the buildings are contrasted, the house being partly half-timbered while the school is constructed entirely in stone. Douglas' biographer Edward Hubbard considers that these two schools "are outstanding among Douglas' village schools". [2]

Aldford village in Cheshire, UK

Aldford is a village and former civil parish, now in the parish of Aldford and Saighton, in the county of Cheshire, England, south of Chester. In 2001 it had a population of 213, increasing to 272 in the 2011 Census. The civil parish was abolished in 2015 to form Aldford and Saighton.

Dodleston farm village in the United Kingdom

Dodleston is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, situated on the border between England and Wales. At the 2001 census, the population of Dodleston was 777, reducing to 715 at the 2011 Census.

Eccleston, Cheshire civil parish

Eccleston is a village and former civil parish, now in the parish of Eaton and Eccleston, in the county of Cheshire, the borough of Cheshire West, and close to Chester. According to the 2001 Census, the population of the entire civil parish was 184, increasing to 246 at the 2011 Census. The civil parish was abolished in 2015 to form Eaton and Eccleston, part also went to Dodleston. The village is situated on the estate of the Duke of Westminster who maintains his ancestral home at nearby Eaton Hall.

See also

Waverton is a civil parish in Cheshire West and Chester, England. It contains 17 buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as designated listed buildings. Of these, one is listed at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II. Apart from the village of Waverton, the parish is rural. Passing through the parish is the Shropshire Union Canal, and three of the bridges crossing this are listed. The other listed buildings in the parish include the parish church, a sundial in the churchyard and the churchyard walls, a former steam mill, a former railway station and goods shed, a former school, a former institute, and a war memorial, together with houses and cottages.

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References