Wavertree Botanic Gardens

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Wavertree Botanic Park and Gardens
Botanic Garden and Wavertree Park - geograph.org.uk - 64705.jpg
Typepublic
Location Wavertree, Liverpool
Coordinates 53°24′22″N2°56′31″W / 53.406°N 2.942°W / 53.406; -2.942 Coordinates: 53°24′22″N2°56′31″W / 53.406°N 2.942°W / 53.406; -2.942
Created1846 [1]
Operated by Liverpool City Council
StatusOpen all year

Wavertree Botanic Gardens (formerly Wavertree Botanic Garden and Park) is an example of a mid 19th century public park. It incorporates an earlier walled botanic garden, founded by William Roscoe as Liverpool Botanic Garden and relocated from land near Mount Pleasant in the 1830s. [2] The gardens include the Grade II curator's lodge built between 1836-1837.

William Roscoe English historian, abolitionist, art collector, politician, lawyer, banker, botanist and writer

William Roscoe was an English historian, leading abolitionist, art collector, M.P. (briefly), lawyer, banker, botanist and miscellaneous writer, perhaps best known today as an early abolitionist and for his poem for children The Butterfly's Ball, and the Grasshopper's Feast.

On 20 November 1940 a stray German bomb caused all the glass in the botanic glasshouse to be broken, the plants inside were shredded. As it was winter, people helped remove the surviving plants into nearby private glasshouses until the war ended. The Orchids were located at Sudley House. The botanic glasshouse was never reinstated after the war, but due to the major efforts by Percy Conn, the new Superintendent of Liverpool Parks, the Liverpool Botanic Garden arose anew in the Harthill Estate grounds at Calderstones Park.[ citation needed ]

Sudley House Historic house and museum in Liverpool, England

Sudley House is a historic house in Aigburth, Liverpool, England. Built in 1824 and much modified in the 1880s, it is now a museum and art gallery which contains the collection of George Holt, a shipping-line owner and former resident, in its original setting. It includes work by Thomas Gainsborough, Joshua Reynolds, Edwin Landseer, John Everett Millais and J. M. W. Turner.

Calderstones Park

Calderstones Park is a public park in Liverpool, Merseyside, United Kingdom. The 126 acres (0.51 km2) park is mainly a family park. Within it there are a variety of different attractions including a playground, a botanical garden and places of historical interest. There is a lake in the park with geese and ducks, and the mansion house, which features a café and a children's play area.

On 22 August 2013 the botanic park and gardens were listed at Grade II* in the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens. [3] In 1886 the International Exhibition of Navigation, Commerce and Industry was held here. [4]

Curator's Lodge, Botanic Garden and Wavertree Park. Wavertree Botanic Gardens Lodge 1.jpg
Curator's Lodge, Botanic Garden and Wavertree Park.

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References

  1. http://liverpool.gov.uk/leisure-parks-and-events/parks-and-greenspaces/wavertree-botanic-gardens/
  2. Botanic Garden and Wavertree Park, Geograph Britain and Ireland, retrieved 5 October 2011
  3. Historic England, "Wavertree Botanic Garden and Park (1001538)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 2 September 2013
  4. "Shipperies exhibition". Archived from the original on 26 October 2009. Retrieved 30 March 2012.Cite web requires |website= (help)