Wavertree Lock-up

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Coordinates: 53°23′54″N2°54′52″W / 53.3983°N 2.9144°W / 53.3983; -2.9144 (Wavertree Lock-up, Liverpool)

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Contents

Wavertree Lock-up
Wavertree lockup 1.jpg
Location Wavertree, Liverpool
Built1796
Restored1869
Restored by James Picton
Listed Building – Grade II
Designated28 June 1952 [1]
Reference no.213897

Wavertree Lock-up is an 18th-century grade II listed village lock-up located in Wavertree, Liverpool, England.

Village lock-up historic building once used for the temporary detention of people

A village lock-up is a historic building that was once used for the temporary detention of people in rural parts of England and Wales. They were often used for the confinement of drunks who were usually released the next day or to hold people being brought before the local magistrate. A typical village lock-up is a small structure with a single door and a narrow slit window or opening. Most lock-ups feature a dome or spire shaped roof and are commonly built from brick, large stones or timber.

Wavertree District of Liverpool

Wavertree is an area of Liverpool, on Merseyside, England, and is a Liverpool City Council ward. The population of the ward taken at the 2011 census was 14,772. Historically in Lancashire, it is bordered by a number of districts to the south and east of Liverpool city centre from Toxteth, Edge Hill, Fairfield, Old Swan, Childwall and Mossley Hill.

Liverpool City and metropolitan borough in England

Liverpool is a city and metropolitan borough in North West England, with an estimated population of 491,500. Its metropolitan area is the fifth-largest in the UK, with a population of 2.24 million in 2011. The local authority is Liverpool City Council, the most populous local government district in the metropolitan county of Merseyside and the largest in the Liverpool City Region.

History

Funded by local residents, the lock-up was constructed in 1796 as a drunk tank to hold intoxicated persons overnight. Prior to its construction a local unpaid constable was charged with looking after drunks in their own home all the while claiming an expense of 2 shillings. Eventually it became cheaper for a lock-up to be built rather than house drunks with a constable and therefore the building was constructed. Made from yellow sandstone, the building is octagonal in shape, two storeys high and made of local sandstone. [2]

Drunk tank

A drunk tank is a jail cell or separate facility accommodating people who are intoxicated, especially with alcohol. Some such facilities are mobile, and may be spoken of as "booze buses".

A constable is a person holding a particular office, most commonly in criminal law enforcement. The office of constable can vary significantly in different jurisdictions. A constable is commonly the rank of an officer within the police. Other people may be granted powers of a constable without holding this title.

Sandstone A clastic sedimentary rock composed mostly of sand-sized particles

Sandstone is a clastic sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-sized mineral particles or rock fragments.

During the 1840s the lock-up served as an isolation room for cholera victims and later during the Irish famine accommodation for families. In 1869, James Picton replaced the building's original flat roof with a pointed one to prevent prisoners from escaping though the building's roof. [3]

Cholera Bacterial infection of the small intestine

Cholera is an infection of the small intestine by some strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. Symptoms may range from none, to mild, to severe. The classic symptom is large amounts of watery diarrhea that lasts a few days. Vomiting and muscle cramps may also occur. Diarrhea can be so severe that it leads within hours to severe dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. This may result in sunken eyes, cold skin, decreased skin elasticity, and wrinkling of the hands and feet. Dehydration can cause the skin to turn bluish. Symptoms start two hours to five days after exposure.

James Picton British architect

Sir James Allanson Picton was an English antiquary and architect who played a large part in the public life of Liverpool. He took a particular interest in the establishment of public libraries.

See also

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References

  1. "Lock Up A Grade II Listed Building in Wavertree, Liverpool". britishlistedbuildings.co.uk. Retrieved 18 June 2017.
  2. Historic England, "Lock up, Childwell, Liverpool (1068320)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 June 2017
  3. Chitty, Mike. "Wavertree Lock-Up". BBC . Retrieved 18 June 2017.