Waxholme

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Waxholme
East Riding of Yorkshire UK location map.svg
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Waxholme
Location within the East Riding of Yorkshire
OS grid reference TA327297
  London 155 mi (249 km)  S
Civil parish
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town WITHERNSEA
Postcode district HU19
Dialling code 01964
Police Humberside
Fire Humberside
Ambulance Yorkshire
EU Parliament Yorkshire and the Humber
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire
53°44′49″N0°00′39″E / 53.746832°N 0.010893°E / 53.746832; 0.010893 Coordinates: 53°44′49″N0°00′39″E / 53.746832°N 0.010893°E / 53.746832; 0.010893

Waxholme is a hamlet in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated on the North Sea coast approximately 1 mile (1.6 km) north-west of Withernsea, off the B1242 road.

Hamlet (place) Small human settlement in a rural area

A hamlet is a small human settlement. In different jurisdictions and geographies, hamlets may be the size of a town, village or parish, be considered a smaller settlement or subdivision or satellite entity to a larger settlement. The word and concept of a hamlet have roots in the Anglo-Norman settlement of England, where the old French hamlet came to apply to small human settlements. In British geography, a hamlet is considered smaller than a village and distinctly without a church or other place of worship.

East Riding of Yorkshire County of England

The East Riding of Yorkshire, or simply East Riding or East Yorkshire, is an area in Northern England and can refer either to the administrative county of the East Riding of Yorkshire which is a unitary authority, to the ceremonial county (Lieutenancy) of the East Riding of Yorkshire or to the easternmost of the three subdivisions (ridings) of the traditional county of Yorkshire.

North Sea marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean

The North Sea is a marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean located between the United Kingdom, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium and France. An epeiric sea on the European continental shelf, it connects to the ocean through the English Channel in the south and the Norwegian Sea in the north. It is more than 970 kilometres (600 mi) long and 580 kilometres (360 mi) wide, with an area of 570,000 square kilometres (220,000 sq mi).

Contents

It forms part of the civil parish of Rimswell.

Old windmill at Waxholme Old Windmill at Waxholme.jpg
Old windmill at Waxholme

Etymology

Waxholme means "village where wax (from bees) is produced. The first element of the name is Old English weax "wax". [1]

Wax class of chemical compounds that are plastic (malleable) near ambient temperatures.

Waxes are a diverse class of organic compounds that are lipophilic, malleable solids near ambient temperatures. They include higher alkanes and lipids, typically with melting points above about 40 °C (104 °F), melting to give low viscosity liquids. Waxes are insoluble in water but soluble in organic, nonpolar solvents. Natural waxes of different types are produced by plants and animals and occur in petroleum.

Bee Clade of insects

Bees are flying insects closely related to wasps and ants, known for their role in pollination and, in the case of the best-known bee species, the western honey bee, for producing honey and beeswax. Bees are a monophyletic lineage within the superfamily Apoidea and are presently considered a clade, called Anthophila. There are over 16,000 known species of bees in seven recognized biological families. They are found on every continent except Antarctica, in every habitat on the planet that contains insect-pollinated flowering plants.

Despite the place-name ending in "-holme" (which is normally from Old Norse holmr "island, water-meadow"), it is not from this word. Instead the ending is Old English ham "homestead", rather than the similar Old English hamm "river-meadow, bend in river", despite the village's proximity to the River Humber. The name was recorded as Wexnem in 1162. [2]

Humber Large tidal estuary in England

The Humber is a large tidal estuary on the east coast of Northern England. It is formed at Trent Falls, Faxfleet, by the confluence of the tidal rivers Ouse and Trent. From there to the North Sea, it forms part of the boundary between the East Riding of Yorkshire on the north bank and North Lincolnshire on the south bank. Although the Humber is an estuary from the point at which it is formed, many maps show it as the River Humber.

In 1823 inhabitants in the village numbered 72. Occupations included seven farmers. [3]

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References

  1. Mills, Anthony David (2003); A Dictionary of British Place Names, Oxford University Press, revised edition (2011), p.486. ISBN   019960908X
  2. Ekwall, Eilert (1960). The concise Oxford dictionary of English place-names (4 ed.). Oxford: Clarendon Press. p. 502. ISBN   0-19-869103-3.
  3. Baines, Edward; History, Directory & Gazetteer of the County of York (1823), p.397. ISBN   1230139141

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