Waxholmsbolaget

Last updated
Waxholmsbolaget
Joint-stock company
Industry Maritime transport
Founded1849
Headquarters,
Area served
Stockholm Archipelago
Services Public transport
Owner Stockholm County Council
Website www.waxholmsbolaget.com

Waxholms Ångfartygs AB, commonly referred to as Waxholmsbolaget, is a shipping company that is owned by Stockholm county council and is responsible for the seaborne public transport in the Stockholm archipelago and Stockholm harbour. The company, which is mostly tax-funded, carried about 4.3 million travellers in 2003, covering a region from Arholma in north of the archipelago to Landsort in the south.

Stockholm archipelago archipelago north of Stockholm, Sweden

The Stockholm archipelago is the largest archipelago in Sweden, and the second-largest archipelago in the Baltic Sea. Part of the archipelago has been designated as a Ramsar site since 1989.

Arholma island in Sweden

Arholma is an island in the north eastern part of the Stockholm archipelago in Norrtälje Municipality. It is 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) long by 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) wide. It is the northernmost island in the archipelago before the Sea of Åland. The island is characterised by a picturesque combination of traditional wooden buildings, farmland, forests and rocky shorelines.

Landsort human settlement

Landsort is a Swedish village with a lighthouse on the island of Öja.

Contents

The company owns 20 archipelago boats, and four boats for the inner-city Djurgården ferry line. The operation of the ships is handled by several contractors, some of whom also operate their own ships on behalf of Waxholmsbolaget.

Djurgården ferry

The Djurgården ferry is an inner city ferry route in Stockholm, Sweden. It runs from a terminal near Slussen, in the old town of Gamla Stan, to "Allmänna gränd" on the island of Djurgården, with an optional stop at the island of Skeppsholmen. The service is integrated into Stockholm's public transport system, as route 82, and accepts all the relevant tickets of Storstockholms Lokaltrafik (SL). It is operated on behalf of SL by Waxholmsbolaget and its sub-contractors, Djurgårdens Färjetrafik.

History

The steamships Norrskar and Storskar date from the beginning of the 20th century and are still used for scheduled traffic in summer Two beauties.jpg
The steamships Norrskär and Storskär date from the beginning of the 20th century and are still used for scheduled traffic in summer

The origins of the company lie in the Djurgårdens Ångbåts-Aktie-Bolag, which was established in 1849. The company operated a steamboat service to the Stockholm archipelago, using the paddle steamers Ran and Aegir on routes from Stockholm to Vaxholm and Dalarö. The new steamboats answered a demand for travel to and from the archipelago, both from affluent Stockholmer’s building summer villas on outlying islands, but also from archipelago residents who travelled into the city to sell fish and vegetables at the market. [1] [2]

Paddle steamer Steam powered vessel propelled by paddle wheels

A paddle steamer is a steamship or steamboat powered by a steam engine that drives paddle wheels to propel the craft through the water. In antiquity, paddle wheelers followed the development of poles, oars and sails, where the first uses were wheelers driven by animals or humans.

Vaxholm Place in Uppland, Sweden

Vaxholm is a locality and the seat of Vaxholm Municipality, Stockholm County, Sweden. It is located on the island of Vaxön in the Stockholm archipelago. The name Vaxholm comes from Vaxholm Castle, which was constructed in 1549 on an islet with this name on the inlet to Stockholm, for defence purposes, by King Gustav Vasa.

Dalarö Place in Södermanland, Sweden

Dalarö is a locality situated in Haninge Municipality, Stockholm County, Sweden with 1,199 inhabitants in 2010.

In 1869 the company was transformed into the Waxholms Ångfartygs Aktiebolag, which came to be popularly known as the Waxholmsbolaget. Shares were issued in the new company, and a new propellor powered steamboat, the Fredriksborg, was built. In 1881, the Waxholm joined the fleet, establishing the design of what became the typical archipelago steamer. However, in 1898, dissatisfaction with the services provided by the Waxholms Ångfartygs Aktiebolag led to the foundation of a competitor, the Stockholm - Vaxholms Rederi AB. In 1901, the two companies merged to form a new company, the Waxholms Nya Ångfartygs AB, which continued to be popularly known as the Waxholmsbolaget. [2] [3] [4] [5]

The Waxholm was a steam ship that was built in 1881, at Stockholm in Sweden, for the Waxholmsbolaget. She operated on services throughout the Stockholm archipelago for that company until 1956, when she was scrapped.

In 1913, the Enskilda Bank took over the running of the Waxholmsbolaget, in order to expand operations and offer a better service throughout the archipelago. One of the changes introduced during this period was the company logo, a "W" on a blue and yellow background, designed by Jacob Hägg  [ sv ]. In 1946, Rederi Svea became the majority shareholder. [2]

Stockholms Enskilda Bank

Stockholms Enskilda Bank, sometimes called Enskilda banken or SEB, was a Swedish bank, founded in 1856 by André Oscar Wallenberg as Stockholm's first private bank. In 1857, Stockholms Enskilda Bank began to employ women, claiming to be the first bank in the world doing so.

Rederi AB Svea company

Stockholms Rederi AB Svea was a Swedish shipping company founded in the 1870s. It operated a wide variety of ships carrying freight and passengers around the world, mostly concentrating on traffic in the Baltic and North Sea and was one of the largest Swedish shipping companies in its time. Rederi AB Svea was one of the founding members of Silja Line, and operated its ships under the names Skandinavisk Linjetrafik, Scandinvian Ferry Lines, Linjebuss and Trave Line. It also had a Finnish daughter company and another daughter company based in the Netherlands. In 1981 Svea was merged into Johnson Line and ceased to operate as an independent company.

In 1964, the company was renamed as Waxholms Ångfartygs AB, under the ownership of the Vaxholm Municipality. Three years later, in 1967, ownership was transferred to a joint body of the City of Stockholm and County of Stockholm. In 1971, with the incorporation of the city into the county, ownership moved to Stockholm County Council. [1] [2] [6]

Vaxholm Municipality Municipality in Stockholm County, Sweden

Vaxholm Municipality is a municipality within Stockholm archipelago in Stockholm County in east central Sweden. The municipal slogan is "Vaxholm – the capital of the archipelago", due to its central location in the archipelago. Its seat is located in the city of Vaxholm.

Stockholm County Council government organization in Sweden

The Stockholm County Council, is a county council, a regional municipal body corresponding to the territory of Stockholm County in Sweden. Its main responsibilities are public healthcare system and public transport.

In 1970, Waxholmsbolaget took over the services and fleet of the Stockholms Ångslups AB  [ sv ] company, which had been founded in 1863. This company operated ferry services within Stockholm city and the inner archipelago, including the Djurgården ferries. [2]

Current fleet

The current fleet owned by the Waxholmsbolaget comprises three classic vessels, nine ice-strengthened ferries, eight fast ferries and four ferries for the urban Djurgården ferry service. [7]

Classic ferries

NameBuiltDescriptionImage
Västan 1900Västan is 32.47 metres (106.5 ft) in length, with a beam of 5.91 metres (19.4 ft), a draught of 2.50 metres (8 ft 2 in), and a capacity of 180 passengers. A Scania diesel engine of 340 horsepower (250 kW) gives a speed of 10.9 knots (20.2 km/h; 12.5 mph). She was built, as the steam ship Nya Svartsjölandet, by Motala Verkstad of Motala, for Nya Svartsjölandet Ångfartygs AB, and initially used on Lake Mälaren. Acquired and renamed by Waxholmolaget in 1937, she was rebuilt and converted to diesel propulsion in 1953, and has been rebuilt and repowered several times since. [8] Vastan June 2013 cropped.jpg
Storskär 1908Storskär is 38.95 metres (127.8 ft) in length, with a beam of 6.99 metres (22.9 ft), a draught of 2.75 metres (9 ft 0 in), and a capacity of 330 passengers. A steam engine of 659 horsepower (491 kW) gives a speed of 13 knots (24 km/h; 15 mph). She was built, as the Strängnäs Express, by Lindholm Shipyard  [ sv ] of Gothenburg, for Strengnäs Nya Rederi AB, and initially used on Lake Mälaren. Acquired by Waxholmolaget in 1939, she still uses her original steam engine with a boiler installed in 1999. [9] MS Storskar EM1B1899 (35126703216).jpg
Norrskär 1910Norrskär is 34.84 metres (114.3 ft) in length, with a beam of 6.88 metres (22.6 ft), a draught of 3.05 metres (10.0 ft), and a capacity of 265 passengers. A steam engine of 409 horsepower (305 kW) gives a speed of 11 knots (20 km/h; 13 mph). She was built, as the Sandhamns Express, by Eriksbergs Shipyard of Gothenburg, for Oscar Seippel, and has operated services in the Stockholm archipelago since she was built. Acquired by Waxholmolaget in 1947, she acquired her current name in 1949. She still uses her original steam engine with a boiler installed in 2000. [10] Norrskar D81 0356 (35887562452).jpg

Ice-strengthened ferries

NameBuiltDescriptionImage
Solöga1978Solöga is the first of two sister ships to be built, followed by Vindöga. She was built by the local Götaverken Finnboda Shipyard  [ sv ]. She is 27.53 metres (90.3 ft) in length, with a beam of 7.2 metres (24 ft), a draught of 3.25 metres (10.7 ft), and a capacity of 180 passengers. A Scania diesel engine of 650 horsepower (480 kW) gives a speed of 11 knots (20 km/h; 13 mph). She was remodelled and a new engine fitted in 2000. [11] [12] MS Sologa 2012 cropped.jpg
Vindöga1978Vindöga is a sister ship to Solöga. She was built by the local Götaverken Finnboda Shipyard  [ sv ]. She is 27.53 metres (90.3 ft) in length, with a beam of 7.2 metres (24 ft), a draught of 3.25 metres (10.7 ft), and a capacity of 180 passengers. A Scania diesel engine of 650 horsepower (480 kW) gives a speed of 11 knots (20 km/h; 13 mph). She was remodelled and a new engine fitted in 2000. [11] [13] Vindoga EM1B3027 (35261770321) cropped.jpg
Waxholm I1983Waxholm I is the first of two sister ships to be built, followed by Waxholm II. She was built by the Lunde Shipyard at Ramvik. She is 36.31 metres (119.1 ft) in length, with a beam of 9.02 metres (29.6 ft), a draught of 3 metres (9.8 ft), and a capacity of 344 passengers. Two Volvo diesel engines with a combined power of 1,200 horsepower (890 kW) give a speed of 13 knots (24 km/h; 15 mph). She was remodelled in 1984, 1993, 2006 and 2015, and was re-engined in 1987, 2000 and 2009. [14] [15] Waxholm I cropped.jpg
Waxholm II1983Waxholm II is a sister ship to Waxholm I. She was built by the Lunde Shipyard at Ramvik. She is 36 metres (118 ft) in length, with a beam of 9.02 metres (29.6 ft), a draught of 2.95 metres (9 ft 8 in), and a capacity of 350 passengers. Two Volvo diesel engines with a combined power of 1,200 horsepower (890 kW) give a speed of 13 knots (24 km/h; 15 mph). She was remodelled in 1984 and 2007, and was re-engined in 1987, 2001 and 2007. [14] [16]
Waxholm II.jpg
Söderarm2004Söderarm is the first of three sister ships to be built, followed by Sandhamn and Dalarö. She was built by the Riga Shipyard at Riga in Latvia, with equipment by Moen Slip at Kolvereid in Norway. She is 39.9 metres (131 ft) in length, with a beam of 10.3 metres (34 ft), a draught of 2.85 metres (9 ft 4 in), and a capacity of 500 passengers. Two Mitsubishi diesel engines with a combined power of 1,755 horsepower (1,309 kW) give a speed of 12.7 knots (23.5 km/h; 14.6 mph). She was re-engined in 2016. [17] [18] MS Soderarm cropped.jpg
Sandhamn2004Sandhamn is a sister ship to Söderarm and Dalarö. She was built by Moen Slip at Kolvereid in Norway. She is 39.9 metres (131 ft) in length, with a beam of 10.3 metres (34 ft), a draught of 2.85 metres (9 ft 4 in), and a capacity of 500 passengers. Four Scania diesel engines with a combined power of 1,800 horsepower (1,300 kW) give a speed of 13.4 knots (24.8 km/h; 15.4 mph). She was re-engined in 2016. [17] [19] MS Sandhamn August 2016 01 cropped.jpg
Dalarö2005Dalarö is a sister ship to Söderarm and Dalarö. She was built by the Riga Shipyard at Riga in Latvia, with equipment by Moen Slip at Kolvereid in Norway. She is 39.9 metres (131 ft) in length, with a beam of 10.3 metres (34 ft), a draught of 2.85 metres (9 ft 4 in), and a capacity of 500 passengers. Four Volvo diesel engines with a combined power of 1,800 horsepower (1,300 kW) give a speed of 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph). [17] [20] Dalaro D81 0355 (35925497801).jpg
Nämdö2009Nämdö is the first of two sister ships to be built, followed by Gällnö. She was built by Uki Workboat at Uusikaupunki in Finland. She is 31.3 metres (103 ft) in length, with a beam of 8.72 metres (28.6 ft), a draught of 2.7 metres (8 ft 10 in), and a capacity of 280 passengers. Four Volvo diesel engines with a combined power of 1,175 horsepower (876 kW) give a speed of 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph). [21] [22] MS Namdo 2012 cropped.jpg
Gällnö2010Gällnö is a sister ship to Nämdö. She was built by Uki Workboat at Uusikaupunki in Finland. She is 31.3 metres (103 ft) in length, with a beam of 8.72 metres (28.6 ft), a draught of 2.7 metres (8 ft 10 in), and a capacity of 280 passengers. Four Volvo diesel engines with a combined power of 1,175 horsepower (876 kW) give a speed of 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph). [21] [23] MS Gallno cropped.jpg

Fast ferries

NameBuiltDescriptionImage
Skärgården1978Skärgården is the first of two sister ships to be built, followed by Roslagen. She was built by Marinteknik Verkstads AB  [ sv ] at Öregrund. She is 35.06 metres (115.0 ft) in length, with a beam of 7.42 metres (24.3 ft), a draught of 1.4 metres (4 ft 7 in), and a capacity of 297 passengers. Four MTU diesel engines, with a combined output of 1,600 horsepower (1,200 kW) give a speed of 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph). After an inspection in 1996 resulted in the imposition of a maximum speed of 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph), she was remodelled the following year and had sponsons added to improve stability. Further remodellings followed in 2003 and 2013, and new engines were fitted in 1988, 2001 and 2013. [24] [25] Skargarden EM1B2489 (34475299094).jpg
Roslagen1979Roslagen is a sister ship to Skärgården. She was built by Marinteknik Verkstads AB  [ sv ] at Öregrund. She is 35.06 metres (115.0 ft) in length, with a beam of 7.42 metres (24.3 ft), a draught of 1.4 metres (4 ft 7 in), and a capacity of 297 passengers. Four Volvo diesel engines, with a combined output of 1,200 horsepower (890 kW) give a speed of 18 knots (33 km/h; 21 mph). After the inspection of Skärgården in 1996 resulted in the imposition of a maximum speed, the Roslagen was remodelled the following year and had sponsons added to improve stability. Further remodellings followed in 2004 and 2015, and new engines were fitted in 1987 and 2004. [24] [26] Roslagen EM1B3513 (35502045315).jpg
Värmdö1990Värmdö is the first of five sister ships to be built, the so-called V-båten as all have names beginning with V. She was built by Oskarshamn Shipyard at Oskarshamn. She is 37.7 metres (124 ft) in length, with a beam of 7.5 metres (25 ft), a draught of 1.7 metres (5 ft 7 in), and a capacity of 340 passengers. Three MTU diesel engines, with a combined output of 2,448 horsepower (1,825 kW) give a speed of 22.5 knots (41.7 km/h; 25.9 mph). As built, the engines exhausted at the waterline, but after a years service she was remodelled to exhaust through funnels. She was further remodelled in 2010 and 2011, and new engines were fitted in 2001 and 2010. [27] [28] Varmdo D81 9729 (35343424716).jpg
Vånö1991Vånö is the second of five sister ships to be built, the so-called V-båten as all have names beginning with V. She was built by Oskarshamn Shipyard at Oskarshamn. She is 37.7 metres (124 ft) in length, with a beam of 7.5 metres (25 ft), a draught of 1.7 metres (5 ft 7 in), and a capacity of 340 passengers. Three MTU diesel engines, with a combined output of 2,448 horsepower (1,825 kW) give a speed of 22 knots (41 km/h; 25 mph). She was remodelled in 2011, and new engines were fitted in 2002 and 2011. [29] [30] Stegesund4 cropped.jpg
Väddö1992Väddö is the third of five sister ships to be built, the so-called V-båten as all have names beginning with V. She was built by Oskarshamn Shipyard at Oskarshamn. She is 37.7 metres (124 ft) in length, with a beam of 7.5 metres (25 ft), a draught of 1.7 metres (5 ft 7 in), and a capacity of 340 passengers. Three MTU diesel engines, with a combined output of 2,448 horsepower (1,825 kW) give a speed of 22 knots (41 km/h; 25 mph). She was remodelled in 2012, and new engines were fitted in 2003 and 2012. [31] [32] MS Vaddo cropped.jpg
Viberö1993Viberö is the fourth of five sister ships to be built, the so-called V-båten as all have names beginning with V. She was built by Oskarshamn Shipyard at Oskarshamn. She is 37.7 metres (124 ft) in length, with a beam of 7.5 metres (25 ft), a draught of 1.7 metres (5 ft 7 in), and a capacity of 340 passengers. Three MTU diesel engines, with a combined output of 2,448 horsepower (1,825 kW) give a speed of 22 knots (41 km/h; 25 mph). She was remodelled in 2012, and new engines were fitted in 2003 and 2012. [33] [34] Vibero D81 9677 (35330651206).jpg
Vaxö1993Vaxö is the last of five sister ships to be built, the so-called V-båten as all have names beginning with V. She was built by Oskarshamn Shipyard at Oskarshamn. She is 37.7 metres (124 ft) in length, with a beam of 7.5 metres (25 ft), a draught of 1.7 metres (5 ft 7 in), and a capacity of 340 passengers. Three MTU diesel engines, with a combined output of 2,448 horsepower (1,825 kW) give a speed of 22 knots (41 km/h; 25 mph). New engines were fitted in 2000 and 2009. [35] [36] Vaxo EM1B3572 (35412164971).jpg
Saxaren1999Saxaren is a later half-sister to the five V-båten. She was built by Båtservice Holding A/S at Mandal in Norway. She is 37.39 metres (122.7 ft) in length, with a beam of 7.5 metres (25 ft), a draught of 1.41 metres (4 ft 8 in), and a capacity of 340 passengers. Two MTU diesel engines, with a combined output of 1,632 horsepower (1,217 kW) give a speed of 20.5 knots (38.0 km/h; 23.6 mph). She was remodelled and new engines were fitted in 2014. [37] [38] MS Saxaren cropped.jpg

Djurgården ferries

See article Djurgården ferry

Notable past fleet

The Express I, in May 1913 ExpressI.jpg
The Express I, in May 1913

The following notable vessels were formerly part of the Waxholmsbolaget fleet:

Related Research Articles

Sandhamn Place in Värmdö Municipality, Sweden

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Uki Workboat Oy is a Finnish shipyard located in Uusikaupunki on the Western coast of Finland. The company specializes in small and medium-sized vessels for professional use, ranging from aluminium-hulled workboats to steel-hulled multipurpose ships and road ferries. The facilities consist of one 100-metre (330 ft) slipway and production halls where boats up to a length of 30 metres (98 ft) can be manufactured indoors.

MV <i>Gustafsberg VII</i> Swedish passenger ferry built in 1912

The Gustafsberg VII is a motor vessel, and former steam ship, that was built in 1912 at Oskarshamn. In 1929 she was sold to Waxholmsbolaget. After being written off in a sinking accident in 1964, she was bought by steamship enthusiasts, salvaged and restored. In 1973, Strömma Kanalbolaget bought the ship. She was converted to diesel power in 1985, and is now used for tourist services in the Stockholm archipelago. Over the years, she has also operated under the names Gustavsberg VII and Saxaren.

Vaxholm Coastal Artillery Regiment

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Kastellet ferry Cable ferry route in the Stockholm archipelago

The Kastellet ferry, also known as the Vaxholmen ferry, is a passenger cable ferry in Sweden's Stockholm archipelago. It connects the town of Vaxholm to Vaxholm Castle, situated on a islet in the middle of the Kodjupet strait between the town and the island of Rindö. At its town terminus, the ferry berths next to the quay used by the Waxholmsbolaget passenger ferries that link Vaxholm to central Stockholm and many other islands of the archipelago.

SS <i>Storskär</i> listed historical ship in Sweden

Storskär is a steamship that was built in 1908 in Gothenburg. She was originally named Strängnäs Express and traded between Stockholm and Strängnäs on Lake Malaren. She was transferred to service on the Stockholm archipelago in 1939, and given her current name in the following year. Storskär has operated for Waxholmsbolaget and her predecessors since 1939, and is today one of that company's classic fleet, alongside Norrskär and Västan. She is a listed historical ship of Sweden.

SS <i>Norrskär</i> listed historical ship in Sweden

The steamship Norrskär was built in Gothenburg in 1910. Originally named Sandhamns Express, she traded between Stockholm and Sandhamn in the Stockholm archipelago. She was sold to Waxholmsbolaget in 1947 and gained her current name in 1949. Today Norrskär is a listed historic ship of Sweden and forms part of Waxholmsbolaget's classic fleet, alongside Storskär and Västan.

MV <i>Västan</i> Swedish passenger ship

Västan is a motor vessel, and former steam ship, that was built in 1900 in Motala. She was originally named Nya Svartsjölandet and traded between Stockholm and Slut on Lake Mälaren. She was sold to Waxholmsbolaget for use in the Stockholm archipelago in 1937 and renamed Västan. She was converted to diesel power in 1953. The Västan is today the oldest of Waxholmsbolaget's classic fleet, operating alongside Storskär and Norrskär which, although newer, have retained their original steam propulsion. She is a listed historic ship of Sweden.

MV <i>Katarina</i> Finnish restaurant ship and former Swedish steamship built in 1869

The Katarina is a restaurant ship, and former steam ship, that was built in 1869 at Stockholm in Sweden. Sailing under her original name of Fredriksborg on the route through the Stockholm archipelago from Stockholm to Vaxholm, she was the Waxholmsbolaget's first propeller-driven steam ship. After being sold by the Waxholmsbolaget in 1882, she operated in various roles under the names Höganäs, Mariehamn, Stella, Wirumaa, Kullervo and André before acquiring her current name in 1985. Today she is a floating restaurant moored in the Aura river in Turku, Finland.

SS <i>Waxholm</i> (1909) Swedish steamship built in 1909

The Waxholm was a steam ship that was built, as the Brevik, in 1909. She was intended for use on local services between Stockholm and the newly built residential area in Brevik on the island of Lidingö. Proven uneconomic on that relatively short service, she was acquired by the Waxholmsbolaget in 1913, renamed Express II and remodelled for use on that company's archipelago services. In 1964 she was renamed Waxholm, but in 1978 she was badly damaged in a fire. Never repaired, she was scrapped in 1983.

Strömma Kanalbolaget

Ångfartygs AB Strömma Kanal, better known as the Strömma Kanalbolaget, is an operator of tourist shipping services in and around Stockholm, Sweden, as well as a number of ferry routes under the name Cinderellabåtarna in the same area. It is part of the Strömma Turism & Sjöfart group, which operates tourist services in a number of cities around Europe, including the City Sightseeing tourist bus franchise for Stockholm.

MV <i>Östanå I</i> listed historical ship in Sweden

The Östanå I is a motor vessel, and former steam ship, that was built in 1905/6 at Stockholm. In 1913 she was sold to Waxholmsbolaget, with whom she remained in service until 1957. Between then and 1986 she was out of service and had a number of owners, and in 1985 she was converted to diesel power. In 1986 the Strömma Kanalbolaget bought the ship. She is now used for tourist services in the Stockholm archipelago. She is a listed historic ship of Sweden.

SS <i>Östanå II</i> former Swedish steam passenger ferry, built 1908, scrapped 1952

The Östanå II was steam ship, that was built in 1908 at Stockholm. In 1913 she was sold to Waxholmsbolaget, with whom she remained in service until 1951, when she went aground and sustained hull damage. In 1952 she was sold for scrap, and towed to the River Tyne in England, where she was scrapped.

SS <i>Express I</i> former Swedish steamship and passenger ferry built in 1900 for the Waxholmsbolaget

The Express I was a steam ship that was built in 1900, as the Express, for the Waxholmsbolaget. She remained on that company's Stockholm archipelago passenger ferry services for her working life, being renamed Express I in 1913, laid up in 1956 and scrapped in 1961.

MV <i>Enköping</i> listed historical ship in Sweden

The Enköping is a Swedish motor vessel, and former steam ship, that was built in 1868 at Oskarshamn. Over the years, she has operated under the names Östhammar, Skokloster, Arholma, Väddö, Glafsfjorden, Södra Skärgården and Soten. In 1948 she was converted to diesel power. In 1990 Strömma Kanalbolaget bought her, and she is now used for tourist services on Lake Malaren and in the Stockholm archipelago. According to her owners, she is the oldest passenger ship still in service in the Lloyd's Register of Shipping, and she is a listed historic ship of Sweden.

MV <i>Angantyr</i> Strömma Kanalbolaget passenger ferry and listed historical ship in Sweden

The Angantyr is a Swedish motor vessel, and former steam ship, that was built in 1909 at Motala Verkstads Nya AB. She now operates cruises and charters for the Strömma Kanalbolaget and is a listed historic ship of Sweden.

SS <i>Drottningholm</i> (1909) Strömma Kanalbolaget passenger ferry and listed historic ship in Sweden

The Drottningholm is a Swedish steam ship that was built in 1909 at Motala Verkstads Nya AB as the Valkyrian, and was also briefly known as the Nya Strömma Kanal. Given her current name in 1969, she now operates cruises and charters for the Strömma Kanalbolaget and is a listed historic ship of Sweden.

References

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  12. "Solöga" (in Swedish). skargardsbatar.se. Archived from the original on 20 October 2017. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
  13. "Vindöga" (in Swedish). skargardsbatar.se. Archived from the original on 20 October 2017. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
  14. 1 2 "Waxholm I" (in Swedish). Waxholmsbolaget. Archived from the original on 22 October 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017.
  15. "Waxholm I" (in Swedish). skargardsbatar.se. Archived from the original on 22 October 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017.
  16. "Waxholm II" (in Swedish). skargardsbatar.se. Archived from the original on 22 October 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017.
  17. 1 2 3 "Sandhamn" (in Swedish). Waxholmsbolaget. Archived from the original on 22 October 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017.
  18. "Söderarm" (in Swedish). skargardsbatar.se. Archived from the original on 22 October 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017.
  19. "Sandhamn" (in Swedish). skargardsbatar.se. Archived from the original on 22 October 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017.
  20. "Dalarö" (in Swedish). skargardsbatar.se. Archived from the original on 22 October 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017.
  21. 1 2 "Nämdö" (in Swedish). Waxholmsbolaget. Archived from the original on 22 October 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017.
  22. "Nämdö" (in Swedish). skargardsbatar.se. Archived from the original on 22 October 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017.
  23. "Gällnö" (in Swedish). skargardsbatar.se. Archived from the original on 22 October 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017.
  24. 1 2 "Skärgården" (in Swedish). Waxholmsbolaget. Archived from the original on 25 October 2017. Retrieved 25 October 2017.
  25. "Skärgården" (in Swedish). skargardsbatar.se. Archived from the original on 25 October 2017. Retrieved 25 October 2017.
  26. "Skärgården" (in Swedish). skargardsbatar.se. Archived from the original on 25 October 2017. Retrieved 25 October 2017.
  27. "Värmdö" (in Swedish). Waxholmsbolaget. Archived from the original on 26 October 2017. Retrieved 26 October 2017.
  28. "Värmdö" (in Swedish). skargardsbatar.se. Archived from the original on 26 October 2017. Retrieved 26 October 2017.
  29. "Vånö" (in Swedish). Waxholmsbolaget. Archived from the original on 26 October 2017. Retrieved 26 October 2017.
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  31. "Väddö" (in Swedish). Waxholmsbolaget. Archived from the original on 26 October 2017. Retrieved 26 October 2017.
  32. "Väddö" (in Swedish). skargardsbatar.se. Archived from the original on 26 October 2017. Retrieved 26 October 2017.
  33. "Viberö" (in Swedish). Waxholmsbolaget. Archived from the original on 27 October 2017. Retrieved 27 October 2017.
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  37. "Saxaren" (in Swedish). Waxholmsbolaget. Archived from the original on 27 October 2017. Retrieved 27 October 2017.
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