West Virginia House of Delegates

Last updated

West Virginia House of Delegates
West Virginia Legislature
Seal of West Virginia.svg
Type
Type
Term limits
None
History
New session started
January 9, 2019 [1]
Leadership
Roger Hanshaw (R)
since August 29, 2018
Speaker pro tempore
Daryl Cowles (R)
since December 10, 2018
Majority Leader
Amy Summers (R)
since December 10, 2018
Minority Leader
Tim Miley (D)
since January 14, 2015
Structure
Seats100
House of Representatives diagram 2014 State of WV.svg
Political groups
   Republican (59)

   Democratic (41)

Length of term
2 years
AuthorityArticle VI, West Virginia Constitution
Salary$20,000/year + per diem
Elections
Last election
November 6, 2018
(100 seats)
Next election
November 3, 2020
(100 seats)
RedistrictingLegislative Control
Meeting place
WV-House-of-Delegate.jpg
House of Delegates Chamber
West Virginia State Capitol
Charleston, West Virginia
Website
wvlegislature.gov

The West Virginia House of Delegates is the lower house of the West Virginia Legislature. Only three states—Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia—refer to their lower house as the House of Delegates.

West Virginia U.S. state in the United States

West Virginia is a state located in the Appalachian region of the Southern United States, and is also considered to be a part of the Mid-Atlantic Southeast Region. It is bordered by Pennsylvania to the north, Maryland to the east and northeast, Virginia to the southeast, Kentucky to the southwest, and Ohio to the northwest. West Virginia is the 41st largest state by area, and is ranked 38th in population. The capital and largest city is Charleston.

Lower house chamber of a bicameral legislature

A lower house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the upper house.

West Virginia Legislature state legislature of the U.S. state of West Virginia

The West Virginia Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of West Virginia. A bicameral legislative body, the Legislature is split between the upper Senate and the lower House of Delegates. It was established under Article VI of the West Virginia Constitution following the state's split from Virginia during the American Civil War in 1863. As with its neighbor and former constituent Virginia General Assembly, the legislature's lower house is also referred to as a "House of Delegates."

Contents

Organization

Regular sessions begin with an organizational day on the second Wednesday of January of each year. [2] The length of regular session is limited to 60 calendar days. [2] The governor can call for special sessions. [2]

Delegates are elected for terms of two years. [2]

Legislative process

Delegates submit bill proposals to the Office of Legislative Services or legislative staff counsel, who draft the bill. [3] Once the bill draft is approved by the delegate, it is submitted for introduction. [3] Bills then undergo committee review and three readings in the house of origin and then the other house of the state legislature. [3]

An unusual feature of the West Virginia legislative process is that revenue bills can originate in either house. [2] The state constitution also prohibits multiple subjects in a single bill. [2]

If approved by both the West Virginia House of Delegates and the West Virginia Senate, bills are submitted to the governor, who may sign them into law or veto them. [2] State legislators can override the governor's veto of bills with a simple majority vote of both houses, unless the bill is a revenue bill, in which case two-thirds of the members elected to each house are required to override the governor's veto or line-item veto. [2]

West Virginia Senate Upper house of the United States Congress

The West Virginia Senate is the upper house of the West Virginia Legislature. There are seventeen senatorial districts. Each district has two senators who serve staggered four-year terms. The Democrats gained two seats in the 2018 elections, bringing their total number of seats to 14, while the Republicans still hold a majority with 20.

Membership

Historical

Affiliation (Elected)Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Republican Other
25th legislature (1900)2645710
26th legislature (1902)2957860
27th legislature (1904)2561860
28th legislature (1906)2560861 (Prohibition Party)
29th Legislature (1908)2660860
30th legislature (1910)6323860
31st legislature (1912)3353860
32nd legislature (1914)2756863 (Fusion Party)
33rd legislature (1916)5242940
34th legislature (1918)2470940
35th legislature (1920)2173940
36th legislature (1922)6529940
37th legislature (1924)3955940
38th legislature (1926)3360941 (Square Deal Party)
39th Legislature (1928)3163940
40th legislature (1930)6826940
41st legislature (1932)7915940
42nd legislature (1934)8212940
43rd legislature (1936)7222940
44th legislature (1938)7024940
45th legislature (1940)7420940
46th legislature (1942)5044940
47th legislature (1944)6529940
48th legislature (1946)5638940
49th Legislature (1948)7816940
50th Legislature (1950)6727940
51st legislature (1952)67331000
52nd legislature (1954)76241000
53rd legislature (1956)58421000
54th legislature (1958)85151000
55th legislature (1960)82181000
56th legislature (1962)76241000
57th legislature (1964)9191000
58th legislature (1966)65351000
59th Legislature (1968)63371000
60th Legislature (1970)68321000
61st legislature (1972)57431000
62nd legislature (1974)87131000
63rd legislature (1976)9191000
64th legislature (1978)74261000
65th legislature (1980)78221000
66th legislature (1982)87131000
67th legislature (1984)73271000
68th legislature (1986)78221000
69th Legislature (1988)79211000
70th Legislature (1990)74261000
71st legislature (1992)79211000
72nd legislature (1994)69311000
73rd legislature (1996)74261000
74th legislature (1998)75251000
75th legislature (2000)75251000
76th legislature (2002)68321000
77th legislature (2004)68321000
78th legislature (2006)72281000
79th Legislature (2008)71291000
80th Legislature (2010)65351000
81st Legislature (2012)54461000
5347 [note 1] 1000
82nd Legislature (2014)36641000
83rd Legislature (2016)36631001 (Independent)
3664 [note 2] 1000
84th Legislature (2018)41591000
Latest voting share41%59%
  1. Ryan Ferns (District 3) changed party affiliation from Democratic to Republican.
  2. Rupert Phillips (District 24) changed party affiliation from Democratic to independent to Republican.

District organization

Prior to the 1970 Census, districts always respected county lines, with districts always consisting of either a single entire county, or several entire counties. Beginning with that year, the state began to use smaller geographic areas.

The 2000 House of Delegates' districting system divided the state into 58 districts that elected a varying number of members. The majority of districts, 35, were single-member districts. 23 districts were multi-member districts, varying from two to seven (the 30th District in Kanawha County) delegates.

Kanawha County, West Virginia County in the United States

Kanawha County is a county in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 193,063, making it West Virginia's most populous county. Its county seat is Charleston, the state capital.

In response to the 2010 Census, the Legislature again was required to redistrict. The Republican Party, and groups from the growing eastern panhandle and Putnam County were among those calling for 100 single member districts. Eventually redistricting was adopted by House Bill 201, which divided the state into 67 districts, of which 47 are one-member districts, 11 two-member districts, 6 three-member districts, 2 four-member districts, and 1 five-member district. The old 30th District was abolished; however, the five-member district, covering most of Monongalia County, remains among the ten largest multi-member lower house districts in the country. These changes took effect with the 2012 election cycle. The state Supreme Court rejected legal challenges and no federal challenge was filed.

Speaker

The Speaker of the House is selected by its members. In contrast to the tradition of the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, the Speaker must vote unless excused. The House rules state that in some cases, he or she is not required to vote unless the House is equally divided, or unless his or her vote, if given to the minority, will make the division equal. In the latter case, the question is lost.

Leadership of the 83rd West Virginia House of Delegates

PositionNamePartyDistrictCounty
Speaker of the House Roger Hanshaw Republican 33 Clay Co.
Speaker pro tempore Daryl Cowles Republican 58 Morgan Co.
Majority Leader Amy Summers Republican 49 Taylor Co.
Minority Leader Tim Miley Democratic 48 Harrison Co.
Majority Whip Paul Espinosa Republican 66 Jefferson Co.
Minority Whip Mike Caputo Democratic 50 Marion Co.

Past composition of the House of Delegates

See also

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References

  1. "West Virginia Legislature" . Retrieved January 8, 2015.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 West Virginia Constitution, West Virginia Legislature (accessed May 29, 2013)
  3. 1 2 3 How a Bill Becomes Law, West Virginia State Legislature (accessed May 29, 2013)

Coordinates: 38°20′9.8″N81°36′41.5″W / 38.336056°N 81.611528°W / 38.336056; -81.611528