White Island (Ross Archipelago)

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White Island
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White Island from Ross Sea
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White Island
Location in Antarctica
Geography
Location Antarctica
Coordinates 78°8′S167°24′E / 78.133°S 167.400°E / -78.133; 167.400 Coordinates: 78°8′S167°24′E / 78.133°S 167.400°E / -78.133; 167.400
Archipelago Ross Archipelago
Administration
Administered under the Antarctic Treaty System
Demographics
PopulationUninhabited
C78192s1 Ant.Map Mount Discovery.jpg

White Island is an island in the Ross Archipelago of Antarctica. It is 28 km (15 nmi) long, protruding through the Ross Ice Shelf immediately east of Black Island. It was discovered by the Discovery Expedition (1901–04) and so named by them because of the mantle of snow which covers it. Some 142 km2 of shelf ice adjoining the north-west coast of the island has been designated an Antarctic Specially Protected Area (ASPA 137) because it supports an isolated small breeding population of Weddell seals. [1]

Contents

White Island consists of two Pleistocene shield volcanoes overlain by volcanic cones. The last known eruption occurred 0.17 million years ago. [2]

See also

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References

  1. "North-west White Island, McMurdo Sound" (PDF). Management Plan for Antarctic Specially Protected Area No. 137: Measure 9, Annex. Antarctic Treaty Secretariat. 2008. Retrieved 2013-09-21.
  2. "White Island". Global Volcanism Program . Smithsonian Institution . Retrieved 2020-03-17.