Wilfred Shingleton

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Wilfred Shingleton
Born(1914-01-24)January 24, 1914
Died1983 (aged 6869)
Occupation

Wilfred Shingleton (January 24, 1914 – June, 1983) was an English art director. He enjoyed a distinguished career in the British film industry from his debut in 1937. Some of his early assignments were several George Formby vehicles – hugely popular with wartime audiences.

His career really kicked off into a higher gear in 1947 when he won the Academy Award for his atmospheric sets for David Lean's Great Expectations .

This led to a string of high-profile projects, including Anna Karenina (1948), The African Queen (1951) and Beat the Devil (1953), both for director John Huston, Hobson's Choice (1954) and Tunes of Glory (1960).

He won a BAFTA for the wartime flying epic The Blue Max in 1966, after which he moved seamlessly into the world of TV, working on the stylish hit series The Avengers .

He received an Emmy nomination for the miniseries Holocaust in 1978, winning the award two years later for the TV movie Gauguin the Savage. His last film – for which he received a BAFTA nomination – was the Merchant Ivory film Heat and Dust in 1983.

Selected filmography

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