William A. Sutherland (American football)

Last updated
William A. Sutherland
Biographical details
Born(1876-12-01)December 1, 1876
Corpus Christi, Texas
DiedMay 21, 1969(1969-05-21) (aged 92)
Las Cruces, New Mexico
Alma mater New Mexico A&M (1898)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1900 New Mexico A&M
Head coaching record
Overall3–3–1

William Alexander Sutherland (December 1, 1876 – May 21, 1969) was an American football coach and lawyer. He served as the head football coach at New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts—now known as New Mexico State University—in 1900, compiling a record of 3–3–1. [1] Sutherland was an 1898 graduate of New Mexico A&M and worked as a lawyer in Las Cruces. [2]

Contents

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
New Mexico A&M Aggies (Independent)(1900)
1900 New Mexico A&M 3–3–1
New Mexico A&M:3–3–1
Total:3–3–1

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References

  1. "2018 Football Media Guide" (PDF). New Mexico State Aggies football. 2018. Retrieved December 30, 2018.
  2. "Catalog Issue". New Mexico State University. 1914. Retrieved December 30, 2018.