William Ayres Reynolds

Last updated
William Ayres Reynolds
William A Reynolds.jpg
Reynolds pictured in The Cincinnatian 1896, Cincinnati yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1874-12-30)December 30, 1874
Oxford, Pennsylvania
DiedAugust 10, 1928(1928-08-10) (aged 55)
Charlotte, North Carolina
Playing career
Football
1893–1894 Princeton
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1891 Rutgers
1896 Cincinnati
1897–1900 North Carolina
1901–1902 Georgia
Baseball
1897 Cincinnati
1898–1899 North Carolina
1902–1903 Georgia
Head coaching record
Overall44–23–8 (football)
36–19–2 (baseball)

William Ayres Reynolds (December 30, 1874 – August 10, 1928) [1] was an American football player and coach of football and baseball. He played football at Princeton University and served as the head football coach at Rutgers University (1891), the University of Cincinnati (1896), the University of North Carolina (1897–1900), and the University of Georgia (1901–1902), compiling a career record of 44–23–8. Reynolds was also the head baseball coach at Cincinnati (1897), North Carolina (1898–1899) and Georgia (1902–1903), tallying a career mark of 36–19–2.

Contents

At North Carolina, as a football coach, he coached the Tar Heels to an undefeated season in 1897 (9–0) and had an overall record of 27–7–4 during his four seasons. As a baseball coach, Reynolds compiled a 21–5–1 record in two seasons at North Carolina.

Reynolds did not enjoy the same level of success at Georgia in either sport. As the Georgia football head coach, he compiled a record of just 5–7–3 during his two-year stay. As a baseball coach, Reynolds fared better, posting a 13–9–1 record over two seasons.

Reynolds was later the vice president of the Southern Cotton Oil Co. He died on August 10, 1928, at his home in Charlotte, North Carolina. [2]

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Rutgers Queensmen (Independent)(1891)
1891 Rutgers 8–6
Rutgers:8–6
Cincinnati (Independent)(1896)
1896 Cincinnati 4–3–1
Cincinnati:4–3–1
North Carolina Tar Heels (Independent)(1897–1900)
1897 North Carolina 7–3
1898 North Carolina 9–0
1899 North Carolina 7–3–1
1900 North Carolina 4–1–3
North Carolina:27–7–4
Georgia Bulldogs (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1901–1902)
1901 Georgia 1–5–20–5–2
1902 Georgia 4–2–14–2–1
Georgia:5–7–34–7–3
Total:44–23–8

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References

  1. A genealogy of James and Deborah Reynolds of North Kingstown, Rhode Island ... - Google Books. July 1, 2009. Retrieved December 9, 2012.
  2. "Former Athlete Dies in Charlotte". Pensacola News Journal . Pensacola, Florida. Associated Press. August 11, 1928. p. 20. Retrieved June 13, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .