William Billers

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Thorley Hall, Thorley, Hertfordshire A view of Thorley Hall, just northeast of the church - geograph.org.uk - 1030006.jpg
Thorley Hall, Thorley, Hertfordshire

Sir William Billers FRS (1689 – 15 October 1745) was an English haberdasher who was Alderman, Sheriff and Lord Mayor of London. [1]

Fellow of the Royal Society Elected Fellow of the Royal Society, including Honorary, Foreign and Royal Fellows

Fellowship of the Royal Society is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society of London judges to have made a 'substantial contribution to the improvement of natural knowledge, including mathematics, engineering science, and medical science'.

Lord Mayor of London Mayor of the City of London and leader of the City of London Corporation

The Lord Mayor of London is the City of London's mayor and leader of the City of London Corporation. Within the City, the Lord Mayor is accorded precedence over all individuals except the sovereign and retains various traditional powers, rights and privileges, including the title and style The Right Honourable the Lord Mayor of London.

He was born in Thorley, Hertfordshire, where the Billers family, who originated from Kirby Bellars in Leicestershire, owned Thorley Hall and manor.

Thorley, Hertfordshire village in Hertfordshire

Thorley is a village and civil parish in East Hertfordshire district of Hertfordshire, England. The parish includes the hamlets of Thorley Street, Thorley Wash and Old Thorley, and is bordered at the north by the market town of Bishop's Stortford.

Leicestershire County of England

Leicestershire is a landlocked county in the English Midlands. The county borders Nottinghamshire to the north, Lincolnshire to the north-east, Rutland to the east, Northamptonshire to the south-east, Warwickshire to the south-west, Staffordshire to the west, and Derbyshire to the north-west. The border with most of Warwickshire is Watling Street.

He became a London haberdasher and a member of the Haberdashers' Company, to whom he donated a painting entitled "The Wise Men's Offering" which hung in Haberdashers' Hall. [2]

In 1720–21, he was elected joint Sheriff of the City of London and in 1733-34 elected Lord Mayor of London. In 1722 he became an Alderman for Cordwainer Ward. [3] In 1726 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society and was knighted in 1727. [1]

Cordwainer (ward)

Cordwainer is a small, almost rectangular-shaped ward in the City of London. It is named after the cordwainers, the professional shoemakers who historically lived and worked in this particular area of London; there is a Livery Company for the trade — the Worshipful Company of Cordwainers. The ward is sometimes referred to as the "Cordwainers' ward".

He died in 1745 and was buried in Thorley church. He married Anne (c.1711–1750), daughter of Sir Rowland Aynsworth and Sarah Fleet (daughter of Sir John Fleet, Lord Mayor of London in 1693), by whom he had two sons and four daughters: John, William, Martha, Anne, Elizabeth, and Maria. [4] His two sons and daughter Martha predeceased him. His eldest daughter Anne, who married John Olmius (later Baron Waltham) was his eventual heiress. [5]

Sir John Fleet was an English merchant who served as Lord Mayor, Sheriff and MP for London.

John Olmius, 1st Baron Waltham Irish Baron

John Olmius, 1st Baron Waltham, was a British landowner and politician.

After his death, his extensive library was auctioned by Christopher Cock at his house in the Great Piazza, Covent Garden on 22 November 1745. [6]

Christopher Cock was an eminent English auctioneer and picture restorer who lived and worked in London. His earliest known auction was in 1717. He operated from various premises in Soho until 1731, when he moved to the Great Piazza, Covent Garden. Cock was auctioneer of the properties and possessions of many well-known men of the time. He was married to Ann, but nothing more is known of his wife or any children; Cock died in 1748 and is buried at St Paul's, Covent Garden.

Covent Garden district in London, England

Covent Garden is a district in Greater London, on the eastern fringes of the West End, between Charing Cross Road and Drury Lane. It is associated with the former fruit-and-vegetable market in the central square, now a popular shopping and tourist site, and with the Royal Opera House. The district is divided by the main thoroughfare of Long Acre, north of which is given over to independent shops centred on Neal's Yard and Seven Dials, while the south contains the central square with its street performers and most of the historical buildings, theatres and entertainment facilities, including the London Transport Museum and the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Fellow details". Royal Society. Retrieved 1 March 2017.
  2. Pugh, Edward. London, by David Hughson. p. 413.
  3. "Aldermen of the City of London: Cordwainer ward". British History Online. Retrieved 1 March 2017.
  4. "Topographical Description of Thorley, Herts". The Gentleman's Magazine . E. Cave. 110: 112. August 1811. Retrieved 28 March 2019.
  5. Burke, Bernard (1866). A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire. Harrison. p. 415. Retrieved 28 March 2019.
  6. Cock, Mr [Christopher] (1745). A catalogue of the entire library of Sir William Billers, Knt. and alderman, lately deceas'd, etc. London: Christopher Cock.
Civic offices
Preceded by
John Barber
Coat of Arms of The City of London.svg
Lord Mayor of London

1733 1734
Succeeded by
Sir Edward Bellamy