William C. Kenyon

Last updated
William C. Kenyon
William C. Kenyon.png
Kenyon pictured in The Prism 1943, Maine yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1898-12-05)December 5, 1898
Manchester, New Hampshire
DiedMay 6, 1951(1951-05-06) (aged 52)
Bangor, Maine
Playing career
Football
1919–1922 Georgetown
1925 New York Giants
Baseball
c. 1920 Georgetown
Position(s) End, fullback, tailback (football)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1926–1941 Maine (assistant)
1942 Maine
1944–1945 Maine
Basketball
?–1935 Maine (freshmen)
1935–1942 Maine
1944–1945 Maine
Baseball
1926–1935 Maine (freshmen)
1936–1943 Maine
1945–1949 Maine
Head coaching record
Overall4–11 (football)
33–51 (basketball)
67–111–2 (baseball)

William Curtis Kenyon (December 5, 1898 – May 6, 1951) was an American football and baseball player and coach of football, basketball, and baseball. He served as the head football coach at the University of Maine in 1942 and from 1944 to 1945, compiling a record of 4–11. Kenyon also the head coach of the basketball team at Maine from 1935 to 1943 and again in 1944–45, and the head coach of the baseball team at the school from 1936 to 1943 and again from 1945 to 1949. Kenyon played college football at Georgetown University from 1919 to 1922 and in the National Football League with the New York Giants in 1925. He also played baseball at Georgetown and was inducted into the university's Athletic Hall of Fame in 1927. [1] Kenyon died on May 6, 1951 at a hospital in Bangor, Maine. [2]

Contents

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Maine Black Bears (Maine Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1942)
1942 Maine 2–4
Maine Black Bears (Maine Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1944–1945)
1944 Maine 2–2
1945 Maine 0–5
Maine:4–11
Total:4–11

Baseball

Below is a table of Kenyon's yearly records as a collegiate head baseball coach. [3]

Statistics overview
SeasonTeamOverallConferenceStandingPostseason
Maine Black Bears (1936)
1936Maine6–6
Maine Black Bears (New England Conference)(1937–1943)
1937Maine9–5–13–32nd
1938Maine11–76–21st
1939Maine4–130–85th
1940Maine5–111–65th
1941Maine4–121–65th
1942Maine6–83–5T–3rd
1943Maine4–83–54th
Maine Black Bears (1945–1948)
1945Maine2–7
1946Maine3–8
1947Maine7–6
1948Maine2–9–1
Maine Black Bears (Yankee Conference)(1949)
1949Maine4–111–45th
Maine:67–111–218–39
Total:67–111–2

      National champion        Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion        Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion      Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

See also

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References

  1. "Athletic Hall of Fame". Georgetown University Official Athletic Site. CBS Interactive . Retrieved July 14, 2011.
  2. "William C. Kenyon" (PDF). The New York Times . Associated Press. May 7, 1951. Retrieved July 14, 2011.
  3. "Baseball" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on June 20, 2014. Retrieved June 20, 2014.