William C. Thompson (cinematographer)

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William C. Thompson (30 March 1889 in Bound Brook, New Jersey 22 October 1963 in Los Angeles) was an American cinematographer.

He started his career in the 1910s and is best remembered today as the cinematographer of many of the films of Ed Wood, including Glen or Glenda (1953) and Plan 9 from Outer Space (1959). Other films he worked on include Maniac (1934), Journey to Freedom (1957), and The Astounding She-Monster (1957).

Partial filmography

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