William Capell, 3rd Earl of Essex

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The 3rd Earl of Essex.
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Coat of arms of William Capell, 3rd Earl of Essex, KG, PC

William Capell, 3rd Earl of Essex, KG PC (11 January 1697 8 January 1743) was an English courtier and diplomat. [1]

Privy Council of the United Kingdom Formal body of advisers to the sovereign in the United Kingdom

Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, usually known simply as the Privy Council of the United Kingdom or just the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords.

Contents

He was the son of the 2nd Earl of Essex.

Capell was one of the founding governors of the charity, the Foundling Hospital, created in October 1739 to care for abandoned children.

Foundling Hospital hospital

The Foundling Hospital in London, England, was founded in 1739 by the philanthropic sea captain Thomas Coram. It was a children's home established for the "education and maintenance of exposed and deserted young children." The word "hospital" was used in a more general sense than it is today, simply indicating the institution's "hospitality" to those less fortunate. Nevertheless, one of the top priorities of the committee at the Foundling Hospital was children's health, as they combated smallpox, fevers, consumption, dysentery and even infections from everyday activities like teething that drove up mortality rates and risked epidemics. With their energies focused on maintaining a disinfected environment, providing simple clothing and fare, the committee paid less attention to and spent less on developing children's education. As a result, financial problems would hound the institution for years to come, despite the growing "fashionableness" of charities like the hospital.

Child abandonment is the practice of relinquishing interests and claims over one's offspring in an extralegal way with the intent of never again resuming or reasserting guardianship over them. Typically the phrase is used to describe the physical abandoning of a child, but it can also include severe cases of neglect and emotional abandonment, such as in the case of a parent who fails to offer financial and emotional support for his or her child over a long period of time. An abandoned child is referred to as a foundling. Baby dumping refers to parents leaving a child younger than 12 months in a public or private place with the intent of terminating their care for the child. It is also known as rehoming, in cases where adoptive parents use illegal means, such as the internet, to find a new home for their child. In most cases, child abandonment is classified under a subsection of child abuse statutes and is punishable with a felony. Following felonious charges, one or both guardians give up their parental rights over the child thus severing their relationship with the child. Some states allow for a reinstatement of parental rights, in which case the parent or parents can have a relationship with the child again. However, it is unlikely that the parents can ever regain custody. The perpetrator can additionally be charged with reckless abandonment if the victim dies as a result of his or her actions or neglect.

Family

On 27 November 1718, Capell married Lady Jane Hyde, a daughter of the 4th Earl of Clarendon and they had two children:

Jane Capell, Countess of Essex, previously Lady Jane Hyde, was a British court official, the first wife of William Capell, 3rd Earl of Essex. She was the daughter of Henry Hyde, 4th Earl of Clarendon, and his wife, the former Jane Leveson-Gower.

Henry Hyde, 4th Earl of Clarendon and 2nd Earl of Rochester, PC was an English nobleman and politician. He was styled Lord Hyde from 1682 to 1711.

Charlotte Villiers, Countess of Clarendon, formerly Lady Charlotte Capell, was the wife of Thomas Villiers, the son of William Villiers, 2nd Earl of Jersey. Thomas would later be raised to the peerage as Baron Hyde and subsequently as Earl of Clarendon, both titles that originated from his wife's family.

Thomas Villiers, 1st Earl of Clarendon British diplomat

Thomas Villiers, 1st Earl of Clarendon PC was a British politician and diplomat from the Villiers family.

George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard Royal Navy admiral

George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard PC was an Anglo-Irish naval commander and diplomat. He was at the Capture of Gibraltar. He took a very valuable prize ship and was briefly a Governor of the Leeward Islands. He took a role in politics, helping to end Robert Walpole's career, but eventually retired.

Lady Jane died in 1724 and William married Lady Elizabeth Russell, a daughter of the 2nd Duke of Bedford on 3 February 1726 and they had one living son, William Anne Capell, 4th Earl of Essex (17321799) who married Frances Hanbury Williams.

Elizabeth Capell, Countess of Essex was the second wife of William Capell, 3rd Earl of Essex, and the mother of William Anne Capell, 4th Earl of Essex.

Wriothesley Russell, 2nd Duke of Bedford English duke

Wriothesley Russell, 2nd Duke of Bedford KG was an English nobleman and politician. He was the son of William Russell, Lord Russell, and his wife Lady Rachel Wriothesley. From 1683 until 1694, he was styled Lord Russell, and from 1695 until his accession in 1700, Marquess of Tavistock.

William Anne Holles Capell, 4th Earl of Essex (7 October 1732 – 4 March 1799), was a British landowner and peer, a member of the House of Lords.

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References

  1. Wikisource-logo.svg  Stephen, Leslie, ed. (1887). "Capel, William". Dictionary of National Biography . 9. London: Smith, Elder & Co.

Wikisource-logo.svg  "Capel, William". Dictionary of National Biography . London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 

Political offices
Preceded by
The Duke of Manchester
Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard
17391743
Succeeded by
The Lord Berkeley of Stratton
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The 1st Earl Cowper
Lord Lieutenant of Hertfordshire
17221743
Vacant
Title next held by
The 2nd Earl Cowper
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Algernon Capell
Earl of Essex
17101743
Succeeded by
William Capell