William Cavendish, 2nd Earl of Devonshire

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The Earl of Devonshire
Earlofdevenshire.jpg
Borncirca 1590
Died20 June 1628
Spouse(s)
(m. 1608)
Children
Parent(s) William Cavendish, 1st Earl of Devonshire
Anne Keighley

William Cavendish, 2nd Earl of Devonshire (c. 1590 – 20 June 1628) was an English nobleman, courtier, and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1614 until 1626 when he succeeded to the peerage and sat in the House of Lords.

Contents

Life

Cavendish was the second son of William Cavendish, 1st Earl of Devonshire, by his first wife Anne Keighley. He was educated by Thomas Hobbes, the philosopher, who lived at Chatsworth as his private tutor for many years. In 1608, he went up to St John's College, Cambridge accompanied by Hobbes. [1] He was knighted at Whitehall in 1609. He then went with Hobbes on a Grand Tour from about 1610, where he visited France and Italy before his coming of age. He was a leader of court society, and an intimate friend of James I, and Hobbes praised his learning in the dedication of his translation of Thucydides.

In 1614, Cavendish was elected member of parliament for Derbyshire. He became Lord Lieutenant of Derbyshire in 1619. In 1621 he was re-elected MP for Derbyshire. In April 1622 he introduced to audiences with the king Schwarzenburg, ambassador from the Emperor Ferdinand, Valerssio from Venice, and d'Arsennes and Joachimi from the United Provinces. He was re-elected MP for Derbyshire in 1624 and 1625. In 1625 he was present at Charles I's marriage with Henrietta Maria. He was high bailiff of Tutbury in 1626 and was re-elected MP for Derbyshire in 1626, until the death of his father early in 1626 gave him a seat in the House of Lords. In the Lords, he resisted George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham's attempt to find a treasonable meaning on a speech of Sir Dudley Digges (13 May 1626).

Cavendish's spending strained his resources, and he procured a private Act of Parliament to enable him to sell some of the entailed estates in discharge of his debts in 1628. His London house was in Bishopsgate, on the site afterwards occupied by Devonshire Square.

Cavendish died at his London house, from over-indulgence it was said, at the age of about 35 and was buried in All Hallows Church (All Saints Church), Derby. The monument was sculpted by Edward Marshall. [2]

Family

Christian, Lady Cavendish, with her daughter Van somer christian lady cavendish.jpg
Christian, Lady Cavendish, with her daughter

Cavendish married Christian(a) Bruce, daughter of Edward Bruce, 1st Lord Kinloss, [3] on 10 April 1608. They had three children:

Notes

  1. Linehan, Peter (2011). St John's College, Cambridge: A History. Boydell Press. p. 129. ISBN   9781843836087.
  2. Dictionary of British Sculptors 1660-1851 by Rupert Gunnis p.254
  3. Pearson, John, The Serpent and the Stag, (Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1983), 44.
  4. HMC Duke of Portland, vol. 2 (London, 1893), p. 118.

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References

Attribution:

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Sir John Harpur
William Kniveton
Member of Parliament for Derbyshire
1614–1626
With: Henry Howard 1614
Sir Peter Fretchville 1621–1622
John Stanhope 1624–1625
John Manners 1626
Succeeded by
Sir Edward Leeke
John Frescheville
Honorary titles
Vacant
Title last held by
The Earl of Shrewsbury
Lord Lieutenant of Derbyshire
jointly with The Earl of Devonshire 1619–1626

1619–1628
Succeeded by
Peerage of England
Preceded by Earl of Devonshire
1626–1628
Succeeded by