William Daniels (cinematographer)

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William H. Daniels, A.S.C
WilliamHDaniels.jpg
Promotional Portrait
BornDecember 1, 1901
DiedJune 14, 1970(1970-06-14) (aged 68)
Resting place Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California
Occupation Cinematographer
Years active19221970
Spouse(s)Betty Lee Gaston
ChildrenTwo daughters and one son

William H. Daniels, A.S.C. (December 1, 1901 June 14, 1970) was a film cinematographer who was Greta Garbo's personal lensman. Early in his career he worked regularly with director Erich von Stroheim. [1]

Contents

Early years

Daniels was born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1901. He started his film career in 1919.

Career

His career as a cinematographer extended fifty years from the silent film Foolish Wives (1922) to Move (1970), although he was an uncredited camera operator on two earlier films (1919 and 1920). His major films included The Naked City (1948), filmed on the streets of New York, for which he won an Academy Award for Best Cinematography.

He also was associate producer of a few films in the 1960s and was President of American Society of Cinematographers (1961–63). [2]

Death

On his death in 1970 in Los Angeles, California, William H. Daniels was interred in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California.

Filmography

Source: [3]

Accolades

Wins

Nominated

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References

  1. William H. Daniels at IMDb.
  2. Steeman, Albert. Internet Encyclopedia of Cinematographers, "William Daniels page," Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 2007. Last accessed: December 28, 2007.
  3. Wallac, David "Dream Palaces of Hollywood's Golden Age." Abrams, New York; Encyclopedia of Cinematographers