William Faulkner bibliography

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William Faulkner
bibliography
William Faulkner 1954 (2) (photo by Carl van Vechten).jpg
Faulkner photographed in December 1954 by Carl Van Vechten.
Novels 19
Stories 125
Plays 1
Screenplays 20
References and footnotes

The bibliography of William Faulkner , an American writer, includes 19 novels, 125 short stories (not including stories that appear exclusively in novels), 20 screenplays (including uncredited rewrites), one play, six collections of poetry as well as assorted letters and essays.

Contents

Faulkner made his debut as a published writer at the age of 21 with the poem "L'Après-midi d'un Faune", which appeared in The New Republic on August 6, 1919. Two more poems, "Cathay" and "Sapphics" and a short story, "Landing in Luck", were published in Mississippian in November 1919. [1]

Faulkner's first novel, Soldiers' Pay , was published in 1926 and his 19th and final, The Reivers , in 1962, the year he died. Numerous works have been published posthumously.

Fiction

Novels

TitlePublication datePublisherNotes
Soldiers' Pay February 25, 1926 Boni & Liveright Faulkner's debut novel. [2]
Mosquitoes April 30, 1927Boni & Liveright [2]
Sartoris January 31, 1929 Harcourt, Brace First novel set in the fictional Yoknapatawpha County; an abridged version of Flags in the Dust . The original manuscript was published posthumously by Random House on August 22, 1973. [3]
The Sound and the Fury October 7, 1929 Jonathan Cape & Harrison SmithAn appendix to the novel, "Compson 1699–1945", was included in The Portable Faulkner, edited by Malcolm Cowley and published by Viking Press in 1946. [2] [4] First appearance of the Compson family.
As I Lay Dying October 6, 1930Jonathan Cape & Harrison Smith [2]
Sanctuary February 9, 1931Jonathan Cape & Harrison SmithAn introduction to the novel by Faulkner was first included in the Modern Library edition of the novel published on March 25, 1932. [5] [6]
Light in August October 6, 1932Harrison Smith & Robert HaasA foreword to the novel by novelist C.E. Morgan has been included in the Modern Library edition of the novel published in April 2012
Pylon March 25, 1935Harrison Smith & Robert HaasFirst novel since Mosquitoes not to be set in Yoknapatawpha County. [2]
Absalom, Absalom! October 26, 1936Random HouseA foreword to the novel by author John Jeremiah Sullivan has been included in the Modern Library edition of the novel published in April 2012. Second novel featuring Quentin Compson, after The Sound and the Fury. [7]
The Unvanquished February 15, 1938Random HouseA collection of seven interrelated short stories, six of which are revisions of stories previously published in The Saturday Evening Post . "An Odor of Verbena" is new to The Unvanquished. [8] [9]
The Wild Palms January 19, 1939Random HouseNot set in Yoknapatawpha County. Consists of two interwoven stories: "The Wild Palms" and "Old Man". Included as If I Forget Thee, Jerusalem , Faulkner's original title, in the Library of America collection Novels 1936-1940, published in 1990. Sometimes published as The Wild Palms [If I Forget Thee, Jerusalem]. [8]
The Hamlet April 1, 1940Random HouseThe first book in Faulkner's Snopes trilogy. [8]
Go Down, Moses May 11, 1942Random HouseContains seven interrelated short stories, five of which had been published previously. "Was" and "The Fire and the Hearth" are exclusive to the novel. First published as Go Down, Moses and Other Stories; the title was altered for subsequent editions at Faulkner's insistence. [10]
Intruder in the Dust September 27, 1948Random House

Chautauqua 1998

William Faulkner; A Heart in Conflict With Itself

John D. Anderson [11]

Requiem for a Nun September 27, 1951Random HouseSequel to Sanctuary. Written as a play with prose parts preceding each act. [12]
A Fable August 2, 1954Random HouseNot set in Yoknapatawpha County. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award in 1955. [13] [14]
The Town May 1, 1957Random HouseThe second book in Faulkner's Snopes trilogy. [15]
The Mansion November 13, 1959Random HouseThe third book in Faulkner's Snopes trilogy. [16]
The Reivers June 4, 1962Random HouseWinner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1963. [16] [17]

Library of America editions

To date, Library of America has published all of Faulkner's novels in five volumes, containing restored authoritative texts.

  • Novels 1926–1929, containing Soldiers' Pay , Mosquitoes , Flags in the Dust , The Sound and the Fury ( ISBN   978-1-93108289-1, 1170 pp, April 6, 2006)
  • Novels 1930–1935, containing As I Lay Dying , Sanctuary , Light in August , Pylon ( ISBN   978-0-94045026-4, 1056 pp, December 1, 1985)
  • Novels 1936–1940, containing Absalom, Absalom! , The Unvanquished , If I Forget Thee, Jerusalem , The Hamlet ( ISBN   978-0-94045055-4, 1148 pp, June 1, 1990)
  • Novels 1942–1954, containing Go Down, Moses , Intruder in the Dust , Requiem for a Nun , A Fable ( ISBN   978-0-94045085-1, 1110 pp, October 1, 1994)
  • Novels 1957–1962, containing The Town , The Mansion , The Reivers ( ISBN   978-1-88301169-7, 1020 pp, October 1, 1999)

Short stories

See also: Collected Stories of William Faulkner and Knight's Gambit

Plays

Screenplays

Produced

YearFilm [20] Credit typeCollaborator(s)Based on
1932 Flesh Uncredited Moss Hart (screenplay)
Edmund Goulding (screenplay)
1933 Today We Live Dialogue Edith Fitzgerald (screenplay)
Dwight Taylor (screenplay)
"Turn About" by William Faulkner
1936 The Road to Glory Screenplay Joel Sayre (screenplay)
Stephen Morehouse Avery (uncredited)
Walter Ferris (uncredited)
Violet Kemble Cooper (uncredited)
Banjo on My Knee Uncredited [19] Nunnally Johnson (screenplay)Banjo on my Knee by Harry Hamilton
1937 Slave Ship StorySam Hellman (screenplay)
Lamar Trotti (screenplay)
Gladys Lehman (screenplay)
Walter Ferris (revisions)
The Last Slaver by George S. King
1939 Gunga Din Uncredited [19] Joel Sayre (screenplay)
Fred Guiol (screenplay)
Ben Hecht (story)
Charles MacArthur (story)
Lester Cohen (uncredited)
John Colton (uncredited)
Vincent Lawrence (uncredited)
Dudley Nichols (uncredited)
Anthony Veiller (uncredited)
"Gunga Din" by Rudyard Kipling
Drums Along the Mohawk Contributor, UncreditedLamar Trotti (screenplay)
Sonya Levien (screenplay)
Drums Along the Mohawk by Walter D. Edmonds
1944 To Have and Have Not Screenplay Jules Furthman (screenplay)
Cleve F. Abams (uncredited)
Whitman Chambers (uncredited)
To Have and Have Not by Ernest Hemingway
1945 The Southerner Uncredited [19] Jean Renoir (screenplay)
Hugo Butler (screenplay)
Nunnally Johnson (uncredited)
Hold Autumn in Your Hand by George Sessions Perry
Mildred Pierce Contract Writer, Uncredited Ranald MacDougall (screenplay) Mildred Pierce by James M. Cain
1946 The Big Sleep Screenplay Leigh Brackett (screenplay)
Jules Furthman (screenplay)
The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler
1955 Land of the Pharaohs Written by Harry Kurnitz (written by)
Harold Jack Bloom (written by)

Unproduced

YearTitleTypeNotes [20]
1932Night BirdStory outline for unwritten screenplayIncluded in Faulkner's MGM Screenplays, published in October 1982 by University of Tennessee Press.
1932ManservantTreatment for unwritten screenplayBased on Faulkner's short story "Love". Included in Faulkner's MGM Screenplays.
1932The College WidowTreatment for unwritten screenplayBased on Night Bird. Included in Faulkner's MGM Screenplays.
1932AbsolutionTreatment for unwritten screenplayIncluded in Faulkner's MGM Screenplays.
1932Flying in the MailTreatment for unwritten screenplay
1933War BirdsScreenplay
1933Louisiana LouScreenplayUsed for the 1934 film Lazy River without Faulkner's involvement.
1942The De Gaulle StoryScreenplayAppears in Faulkner: A Comprehensive Guide to the Brodsky Collection, Volume III: The De Gaulle Story, published in January 1984 by University Press of Mississippi.
1943Country LawyerStory treatmentIncluded in Country Lawyer and Other Stories for the Screen, published in June 1987 by University Press of Mississippi.
1943Battle CryScreenplayAppears in Faulkner: A Comprehensive Guide to the Brodsky Collection, Volume IV: Battle Cry, published in December 1985 by University Press of Mississippi.
1945Stallion RoadScreenplayAppears in Stallion Road: A Screenplay, published in December 1989 by University Press of Mississippi.

Poetry collections

Essays

YearTitle
1953"A Note On Sherwood Anderson"
1954"Mississippi"
1954"A Guest's Impression of New England"
1955"An Innocent at Rinkside"
1955"Kentucky: May: Saturday"
1955"On Privacy"
1955"Impressions of Japan"
1955"To the Youth of Japan"
1956"Letter to the Northern Editor"
1956"On Fear: Deep South in Labor: Mississippi"
1956"A Letter to the Leaders in the Negro Race"
1961"Albert Camus"

Related Research Articles

William Faulkner American writer (1897–1962)

William Cuthbert Faulkner was an American writer known for his novels and short stories set in the fictional Yoknapatawpha County, based on Lafayette County, Mississippi, where Faulkner spent most of his life. A Nobel Prize laureate, Faulkner is one of the most celebrated writers of American literature and is widely considered the greatest writer of Southern literature.

<i>Light in August</i> 1932 novel by William Faulkner

Light in August is a 1932 novel by the Southern American author William Faulkner. It belongs to the Southern gothic and modernist literary genres.

<i>Absalom, Absalom!</i> 1936 novel by William Faulkner

Absalom, Absalom! is a novel by the American author William Faulkner, first published in 1936. Taking place before, during, and after the American Civil War, it is a story about three families of the American South, with a focus on the life of Thomas Sutpen.

Yoknapatawpha County Fictional Mississippi county created by William Faulkner

Yoknapatawpha County is a fictional Mississippi county created by the American author William Faulkner, largely based upon and inspired by Lafayette County, Mississippi, and its county seat of Oxford. Faulkner often referred to Yoknapatawpha County as "my apocryphal county".

The Compson family is a fictional family created by American author William Faulkner for use in his novels and short stories. A once prominent family in Yoknapatawpha County, Mississippi, the family began to fall on hard times in the twentieth century. Principally depicted in The Sound and the Fury and in its appendix, they also make appearances in Absalom, Absalom! and stories such as "That Evening Sun". The family name is also referred to briefly in the opening chapter of Requiem for a Nun. Faulkner traced their genealogy from 1699 to 1945.

<i>As I Lay Dying</i> Novel by William Faulkner

As I Lay Dying is a 1930 Southern Gothic novel by American author William Faulkner. Faulkner's fifth novel, it is consistently ranked among the best novels of 20th-century literature. The title derives from Book XI of Homer's Odyssey, wherein Agamemnon tells Odysseus, "As I lay dying, the woman with the dog's eyes would not close my eyes as I descended into Hades."

William Clark Falkner American poet

William Clark Falkner was a soldier, lawyer, politician, businessman, and author in northern Mississippi. He is most notable for the influence he had on the work of his great-grandson, author William Faulkner.

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Rowan Oak Historic house in Mississippi, United States

Rowan Oak is William Faulkner's former home in Oxford, Mississippi. It is a primitive Greek Revival house built in the 1840s by Colonel Robert Sheegog, an Irish immigrant planter from Tennessee. Faulkner purchased the house when it was in disrepair in 1930, and did many of the renovations himself. Other renovations were done in the 1950s. One of its more famous features is the outline of Faulkner's Pulitzer Prize–winning novel A Fable, penciled in graphite and red on the plaster walls of his office. It is now owned and operated by the University of Mississippi as a museum, and is open to visitors year-round.

<i>Requiem for a Nun</i> 1951 novel by William Faulkner

Requiem for a Nun is a work of fiction written by William Faulkner. It is a sequel to Faulkner's early novel Sanctuary, which introduced the characters of Temple Drake, her friend Gowan Stevens, and Gowan's uncle Gavin Stevens. The events in Requiem are set in Faulkner's fictional Yoknapatawpha County and Jackson, Mississippi, in November 1937 and March 1938, eight years after the events of Sanctuary. In Requiem, Temple, now married with a child, must learn to deal with her violent, turbulent past as related in Sanctuary.

Louis Daniel Brodsky was an American poet, short story writer, and Faulkner scholar.

<i>Soldiers Pay</i>

Soldiers' Pay is the first novel published by the American author William Faulkner. It was originally published by Boni & Liveright on February 25, 1926. It is unclear if Soldiers' Pay is the first novel written by Faulkner. It is however the first novel published by the author. Faulkner was working on two manuscripts while finishing Soldiers' Pay.

<i>The Reivers</i> (film) 1969 film by Mark Rydell

The Reivers is a 1969 Technicolor film in Panavision starring Steve McQueen and directed by Mark Rydell based on the 1962 William Faulkner novel The Reivers, a Reminiscence. The supporting cast includes Sharon Farrell, Rupert Crosse, Mitch Vogel, and Burgess Meredith as the narrator.

The Snopes trilogy is a series of three novels written by William Faulkner regarding the Snopes family in the fictional Yoknapatawpha County, Mississippi. It consists of The Hamlet, The Town, and The Mansion. It was begun in 1940 and completed in 1959.

Center for Faulkner Studies

The Center for Faulkner Studies (CFS) is a research center located at Southeast Missouri State University. It is devoted to the study of the life and works of William Faulkner (1897–1962), the American author who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950. The Center was established in 1989, after the university acquired the Louis Daniel Brodsky collection of Faulkner materials. The founding director of the CFS is Robert W. Hamblin, now Professor Emeritus of English at Southeast. He worked with Brodsky starting in 1979 to produce books, articles, lectures, and exhibits based on the materials in the collection. Dr. Christopher Rieger, Professor of English at Southeast, took Dr. Hamblin's place as the Center's director in 2013. Dr. Hamblin is now a volunteer consultant for the Center.

The literature of Mississippi, United States, includes fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. Mississippi has a literary tradition that arose from a diverse mix of cultures and races. Traditional themes from this genre of literature lean towards the past, conflict and change, and southern history in general; however, in the modern era, work have shifted towards deeply Southern works that do not rely on these traditional themes.

Bobby ("Robert") Wayne Hamblin is a poet, an author, and a professor emeritus at Southeast Missouri State University. He is best known for his achievements related to the works of William Faulkner.

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2 Samuel 17 Second Book of Samuel chapter

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2 Samuel 18 Second Book of Samuel chapter

2 Samuel 18 is the eighteenth chapter of the Second Book of Samuel in the Old Testament of the Christian Bible or the second part of Books of Samuel in the Hebrew Bible. According to Jewish tradition the book was attributed to the prophet Samuel, with additions by the prophets Gad and Nathan, but modern scholars view it as a composition of a number of independent texts of various ages from c. 630–540 BCE. This chapter contains the account of David's reign in Jerusalem. This is within a section comprising 2 Samuel 9–20 and continued to 1 Kings 1–2 which deal with the power struggles among David's sons to succeed David's throne until 'the kingdom was established in the hand of Solomon'.

References

  1. Fargnoli, Golay & Hamblin 2008, p. 461.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Fargnoli, Golay & Hamblin 2008, p. 483.
  3. Padgett, John B. (2000). "WFotW – Flags in the Dust: Commentary". William Faulkner on the Web. The University of Mississippi . Retrieved 2011-06-21.
  4. Padgett, John B. (2000). "The Portable Faulkner (Short Story Collections)". William Faulkner on the Web. The University of Mississippi. Retrieved 2011-06-21.
  5. Fargnoli, Golay & Hamblin 2008, p. 468.
  6. Padgett, John B. (2000). "Sanctuary: Commentary". William Faulkner on the Web. The University of Mississippi. Retrieved 2011-06-21.
  7. Fargnoli, Golay & Hamblin 2008, p. 470.
  8. 1 2 3 Fargnoli, Golay & Hamblin 2008, p. 471.
  9. Padgett, John B. (2000). "The Unvanquished: Commentary". William Faulkner on the Web. The University of Mississippi. Retrieved 2011-06-21.
  10. Fargnoli, Golay & Hamblin 2008, p. 472.
  11. Anderson, John (December 10, 2012). "William Faulkner; A Heart in Conflict With Itself". Archived from the original on 2012-12-10.
  12. Fargnoli, Golay & Hamblin 2008, p. 474.
  13. Fargnoli, Golay & Hamblin 2008, p. 475.
  14. Padgett, John B. (2000). "A Fable: commentary". William Faulkner on the Web. The University of Mississippi. Retrieved 2011-06-21.
  15. Padgett, John B. (2000). "The Town: commentary". William Faulkner on the Web. The University of Mississippi. Retrieved 2011-06-21.
  16. 1 2 Fargnoli, Golay & Hamblin 2008, p. 478.
  17. Padgett, John B. (2000). "The Reivers: commentary". William Faulkner on the Web. The University of Mississippi. Retrieved 2011-06-21.
  18. Popova, Maria (28 Dec 2012), "The Strange Story of William Faulkner's Only Children's Book", Brain pickings.
  19. 1 2 3 4 Padgett, John B. (2000). "Works by William Faulkner (comprehensive list)". William Faulkner on the Web. The University of Mississippi. Retrieved 2011-06-21.
  20. 1 2 Fargnoli, Golay & Hamblin 2008, p. 494–95.
  21. 1 2 3 Padgett, John B. (2000). "WFotW ~ Works by William Faulkner (comprehensive list)". William Faulkner on the Web. The University of Mississippi. Retrieved 2011-06-21.

Bibliography