William Hall-Jones

Last updated


Sir William Hall-Jones

William Hall-Jones 2.jpg
16th Prime Minister of New Zealand
In office
10 June 1906 6 August 1906
Monarch Edward VII
Governor William Plunket
Preceded by Richard Seddon
Succeeded by Joseph Ward
ConstituencyTimaru
2nd High Commissioner to the United Kingdom
In office
1908–1912
Preceded by William Pember Reeves
Succeeded by Thomas Mackenzie
Personal details
Born(1851-01-16)16 January 1851
Folkestone, Kent, England
Died19 June 1936(1936-06-19) (aged 85)
Wellington, New Zealand
Political party Liberal
Spouse(s)
Fanny Smith
(m. 1873;died 1876)
[1]
Rosalind Lucy Purss
(m. 1877;his death 1936)
Children Fred Hall-Jones
Signature William Hall-Jones signature.jpg

Sir William Hall-Jones KCMG (16 January 1851 – 19 June 1936) was the 16th Prime Minister of New Zealand from June 1906 until August 1906.

Contents

Hall-Jones entered parliament in 1890, later becoming a member of the Liberal Party. He served as interim Prime Minister from the death of Richard Seddon to the return from overseas of Joseph Ward. Hall-Jones was a mild mannered man with a fully earned reputation as an outstanding administrator. Seddon famously said of him, "He is the best administrator I have in my Cabinet". [2]

The New Zealand Liberal Party was the first organised political party in New Zealand. It governed from 1891 until 1912. The Liberal strategy was to create a large class of small land-owning farmers who supported Liberal ideals, by buying large tracts of Māori land and selling it to small farmers on credit. The Liberal Government also established the basis of the later welfare state, with old age pensions, developed a system for settling industrial disputes, which was accepted by both employers and trade unions. In 1893 it extended voting rights to women, making New Zealand the first country in the world to enact universal female suffrage.

Richard Seddon 15th and longest-serving Prime Minister of New Zealand

Richard John Seddon was a New Zealand politician who served as the 15th Premier of New Zealand from 1893 until his death.

Joseph Ward New Zealand politician

Sir Joseph George Ward of Wellington, 1st Baronet, was a New Zealand politician who served as the 17th Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1906 to 1912 and from 1928 to 1930. He was a dominant figure in the Liberal and United ministries of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

From 1908 to 1912 Hall-Jones served as New Zealand's High Commissioner to the United Kingdom.

Early years

Hall-Jones was born in Folkestone, Kent, England, landed at Dunedin in 1873 and became a carpenter and later a builder in Timaru. [1] He developed an interest in local politics serving on the Timaru Borough Council from 1884 to 1886, and again from 1890 to 1892. [1]

Folkestone town in the Shepway District of Kent, England

Folkestone is a port town on the English Channel, in Kent, south-east England. The town lies on the southern edge of the North Downs at a valley between two cliffs. It was an important harbour and shipping port for most of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Kent County of England

Kent is a county in South East England and one of the home counties. It borders Greater London to the north-west, Surrey to the west and East Sussex to the south-west. The county also shares borders with Essex along the estuary of the River Thames, and with the French department of Pas-de-Calais through the Channel Tunnel. The county town is Maidstone.

Dunedin City in Otago, New Zealand

Dunedin is the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the principal city of the Otago region. Its name comes from Dùn Èideann, the Scottish Gaelic name for Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland.

Member of Parliament

New Zealand Parliament
YearsTermElectorateParty
1890 10th Timaru Independent Liberal
1890 1893 11th Timaru Independent Liberal
1893 1896 12th Timaru Independent Liberal
1896 1899 13th Timaru Liberal
1899 1902 14th Timaru Liberal
1902 1905 15th Timaru Liberal
1905 1908 16th Timaru Liberal

The death of Richard Turnbull triggered a by-election in the Timaru electorate, which was won by Hall-Jones on 18 August 1890. [3] Hall-Jones had initially refused nomination from locals, citing several upcoming business contracts. However, after persistent calls, Hall-Jones reluctantly accepted despite having no parliamentary ambitions. [4] He represented Timaru in the House of Representatives until his resignation in October 1908.

Richard Turnbull (politician) New Zealand politician

Richard Turnbull was a 19th-century member of parliament in Canterbury, New Zealand.

Timaru was a New Zealand Parliamentary electorate, in the South Island. It existed continuously from 1861 to 1996 and was represented by eleven Members of Parliament.

The 1890 Timaru by-election was a by-election held on 18 August 1890 during the 10th New Zealand Parliament in the seat of Timaru, a partly urban seat in Canterbury on the East Coast of the South Island.

Hall-Jones proved an independent thinker. He was initially an Independent Liberal holding moderate, progressive views that tended to align him with John Ballance, Sir George Grey and John McKenzie. He joined the Liberal caucus and in 1891 became the party whip alongside Westby Perceval. [5]

John Ballance 14th Premier of New Zealand

John Ballance was an Irish-born New Zealand politician who was the 14th Premier of New Zealand, from January 1891 to April 1893, the founder of the Liberal Party, and a Georgist. In 1891 he led his party to its first election victory, forming the first New Zealand government along party lines, but died in office three years later. Ballance supported votes for women and land reform, though at considerable cost to Māori.

George Grey Premier of New Zealand (1877–1879)

Sir George Grey, KCB was a British soldier, explorer, colonial administrator and writer. He served in a succession of governing positions: Governor of South Australia, twice Governor of New Zealand, Governor of Cape Colony, and the 11th Premier of New Zealand.

John McKenzie (New Zealand politician) New Zealand politician

Sir John McKenzie was a New Zealand politician. He served as Minister of Lands and Agriculture in the Liberal Government of John Ballance.

Cabinet Minister

Hall-Jones became a cabinet minister in March 1896 given the Public Works portfolio by Prime Minister Richard Seddon following William Pember Reeves resignation to become Agent General for New Zealand in the United Kingdom. [6] His main task in this role was improving the main trunk rail line between Auckland and Wellington. Rejecting a proposal for another incline on the Rimutaka ranges he insisted on using a better route, resulting in the Raurimu spiral. He was also responsible for the eventual construction of the Otira tunnel, going through Arthur's Pass. [1]

Several weeks after entering cabinet Hall-Jones was also appointed Minister of Marine, which he was to hold for over a decade. [7] Hall-Jones was also responsible for passing a bill granting protection to famous navigation dolphin Pelorus Jack by Order in Council under the Sea Fisheries Act on 26 September 1904. [8]

Prime Minister

Hall-Jones was acting Prime Minister during the absence from the country of Seddon in 1906 and formed an administration immediately after Seddon's funeral. During his brief period as Prime Minister, he was Colonial Treasurer, Minister of Labour, Minister of Education, Minister for Public Works, and Minister of Marine. [9]

However, Hall-Jones announced that he would only hold power until Sir Joseph Ward's return from abroad. Despite this, there was much speculation in the media that he may attempt to remain in office as Seddon himself had done in 1893. [10]

Later career

Hall-Jones accepted the Railways and Public Works portfolios in the subsequent Ward administration. Later, he succeeded William Pember Reeves as High Commissioner for New Zealand in London in December 1908, returned to New Zealand at the end of his term in 1912, and was appointed to the Legislative Council by Massey.[ citation needed ]

Hall-Jones died at his home in Wellington on 19 June 1936. [2]

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 Hall-Jones, John. "Hall-Jones, William 1851–1936". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 10 December 2011.
  2. 1 2 Foster 1966.
  3. Wilson 1985, p. 202.
  4. Hall-Jones 1969, p. 24.
  5. Hall-Jones 1969, p. 28.
  6. Hall-Jones 1969, p. 43.
  7. Hall-Jones 1969, p. 48.
  8. Hall-Jones 1969, p. 51.
  9. Wilson 1985, p. 73.
  10. Hamer 1988, p. 254.

Related Research Articles

William Massey Prime Minister of New Zealand

William Ferguson Massey, commonly known as Bill Massey, was a politician who served as the 19th Prime Minister of New Zealand from May 1912 to May 1925. He was the founding leader of the Reform Party, New Zealand's second organised political party, from 1909 until his death.

Francis Bell (New Zealand politician) New Zealand politician

Sir Francis Henry Dillon Bell was a New Zealand lawyer and politician who served as the 20th Prime Minister of New Zealand from 10 to 30 May 1925. He was the first New Zealand-born prime minister, holding office in a caretaker capacity following the death of William Massey.

William Pember Reeves New Zealand politician

William Pember Reeves was a New Zealand politician, historian and poet who promoted social reform.

1911 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1911 was held on Thursday, 7 and 14 December in the general electorates, and on Tuesday, 19 December in the Māori electorates to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 18th session of the New Zealand Parliament. A total number of 590,042 (83.5%) voters turned out to vote. In two seats there was only one candidate.

The following lists events that happened during 1906 in New Zealand.

James Carroll (New Zealand politician) New Zealand politician

Sir James Carroll, known to Māori as Timi Kara, was a New Zealand politician of Irish and Ngāti Kahungunu (Māori) descent. Beginning his career as an interpreter and land agent, Carroll was elected to the Eastern Maori seat in 1887. He was acting Colonial Secretary from 1897 to 1899. He was the first Māori to hold the cabinet position of Minister of Native Affairs, which he held between 1899 and 1912. He was held in high regard within the Liberal Party and was acting prime minister in 1909 and 1911.

Patrick Buckley (New Zealand politician) New Zealand politician

Sir Patrick Alphonsus Buckley was a New Zealand soldier, lawyer, statesman, and judge who held several high government posts in Wellington in the early 1890s.

William Russell (New Zealand politician) New Zealand politician, born 1838

Sir William Russell Russell was a New Zealand politician from 1870 to 1905. He was a cabinet minister, and was recognised as Leader of the Opposition from 1894 to 1901. Though considered by other politicians to have little sympathy with working people as a major landowner his panache and involvement in local affairs led him to be liked and admired by Hawkes Bay's élite.

John A. Millar New Zealand politician

John Andrew Millar was a New Zealand politician of the Liberal Party from Otago.

John Findlay (New Zealand politician) New Zealand politician

Sir John George Findlay was a New Zealand politician of the Liberal Party, and was a Cabinet minister from 1906 to 1911.

Roderick McKenzie New Zealand politician

Roderick McKenzie was a New Zealand Member of Parliament for Buller and Motueka, in the South Island. He was a member of the Liberal Party.

Charles H. Mills New Zealand politician

Charles Houghton Mills was a member of parliament for Waimea and Wairau, in the South Island of New Zealand.

James Frederick Arnold New Zealand politician

James Frederick Arnold was a New Zealand Member of Parliament of the Liberal Party for various Dunedin electorates.

16th New Zealand Parliament

The 16th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1905 general election in December of that year.

18th New Zealand Parliament

The 18th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1911 general election in December of that year.

1913 New Zealand Liberal Party leadership election

The New Zealand Liberal Party leadership election 1913 was held on 11 September to choose the next leader of the New Zealand Liberal Party. The election was won by Awarua MP and former party leader Joseph Ward.

1906 New Zealand Liberal Party leadership election

The New Zealand Liberal Party leadership election 1906 was held to choose the next leader of the New Zealand Liberal Party. The election was won by Awarua MP and incumbent deputy leader Joseph Ward.

The New Zealand Liberal Party leadership election 1893 was held to decide the second leader of the New Zealand Liberal Party. The position went to Westland MP and incumbent deputy leader Richard Seddon.

References

Government offices
Preceded by
Richard Seddon
Prime Minister of New Zealand
1906
Succeeded by
Joseph Ward
Political offices
Preceded by
William Pember Reeves
Minister of Justice
1896
Succeeded by
Thomas Thompson
Preceded by
Richard Seddon
Minister of Education
1906
Succeeded by
George Fowlds
Preceded by
Joseph Ward
Minister of Railways
1906–1908
Succeeded by
John A. Millar
Party political offices
Preceded by
Richard Seddon
Leader of the Liberal Party
1906
Succeeded by
Joseph Ward
New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by
Richard Turnbull
Member of Parliament for Timaru
1890–1908
Succeeded by
James Craigie
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
William Pember Reeves
High Commissioner of New Zealand to the United Kingdom
1908–1912
Succeeded by
Thomas Mackenzie