William Hogenson

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William Hogenson
William Hogenson.jpg
Hogenson in 1904
Medal record
Men's athletics
Representing the Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Olympic Games
Silver medal icon (S initial).svg 1904 St. Louis 60 metres
Bronze medal icon (B initial).svg 1904 St. Louis 100 metres
Bronze medal icon (B initial).svg 1904 St. Louis 200 metres

William "Bill" P. Hogenson (October 26, 1884 October 14, 1965) was an American athlete and sprinter, who competed in the early twentieth century. He won a silver medal in Athletics at the 1904 Summer Olympics in the men's 60 m dash, but was beaten by Archie Hahn, who took gold. He also won two bronze medals, over 100 m and 200 m, both distances won by Archie Hahn of the United States. [1]

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References

  1. "William Hogenson". Olympedia. Retrieved January 10, 2021.