William II, Duke of Jülich

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William II, Duke of Jülich
Bornc. 1327
Died(1393-12-13)13 December 1393
Noble family House of Jülich
Spouse(s) Maria of Guelders
Father William I, Duke of Jülich
Mother Joanna of Hainaut

William II, Duke of Jülich (c. 1327 13 December 1393) was the second Duke of Jülich and the sixth William in the House of Jülich. He was the second son of William I of Jülich and Joanna of Hainaut. [1]

Duchy of Jülich duchy

The Duchy of Jülich comprised a state within the Holy Roman Empire from the 11th to the 18th centuries. The duchy lay left of the Rhine river between the Electorate of Cologne in the east and the Duchy of Limburg in the west. It had territories on both sides of the river Rur, around its capital Jülich – the former Roman Iuliacum – in the lower Rhineland. The duchy amalgamated with the County of Berg beyond the Rhine in 1423, and from then on also became known as Jülich-Berg.

William V, Duke of Jülich was a German nobleman. Some authors call him William I, because he was the first Duke of Jülich; the earlier Williams had been Count of Jülich. Other authors call the subject of this article "William VI"; they count the son and co-ruler of William IV as William V.

Joanna of Hainault (1315–1374) was a Duchess of Jülich by marriage to William V, Duke of Jülich. She was the third daughter of William I, Count of Hainaut, and Joanna of Valois. She was a younger sister of Philippa of Hainault, Queen of England, and Margaret II of Hainault.

Contents

William was co-ruler from 1343. He quarreled greatly with his father and imprisoned him from 1349-1351. He tried for many years in Holland-Zeeland to enforce claims against the House of Wittelsbach but failed. When his father died in 1361, William became the second Duke of Jülich, his elder brother Gerhard having predeceased their father. He led the traditional feuds of the House of Jülich and lost Kaiserswerth and Zülpich, among others. William intervened in favor of Edward in the catastrophic war of succession between his brothers-in-law Reinald and Edward for control of the Duchy of Guelders. He took part in the 1371 Battle of Baesweiler (in which Edward was mortally wounded) and captured Wenceslaus I, Duke of Luxembourg. His brother-in-law Reinald died later in 1371 and as neither Reinald nor Edward left heirs, another fight for the succession of Guelders arose between William and his wife Maria (sister to Reinald and Edward) and Maria's sister Mathilde, wife of John II, Count of Blois. In 1377, Emperor Charles IV granted Guelders to William's son William, but the title was not secured until 1379. Among other territories, William acquired Monschau-Montjoie, Randerath and Linnich.

Holland Region and former province on the western coast of the Netherlands

Holland is a region and former province on the western coast of the Netherlands. The name Holland is also frequently used informally to refer to the whole of the country of the Netherlands. This usage is commonly accepted in other countries, and sometimes employed by the Dutch themselves. However, some in the Netherlands, particularly those from regions outside Holland, may find it undesirable or misrepresentative to use the term for the whole country.

Zeeland Province of the Netherlands

Zeeland is the westernmost and least populous province of the Netherlands. The province, located in the south-west of the country, consists of a number of islands and peninsulas and a strip bordering Belgium. Its capital is Middelburg. Its area is about 2,930 square kilometres (1,130 sq mi), of which almost 1,140 square kilometres (440 sq mi) is water, and it has a population of about 380,000.

House of Wittelsbach German noble family

The House of Wittelsbach is a European royal family and a German dynasty from Bavaria.

Family and children

William married in December 1362 to Maria of Guelders (c. 1328 – November 1397), daughter of Reinald II of Guelders. They had three children:

Reginald II, Duke of Guelders Dutch noble

Reginald II of Guelders, called "the Black", was Count of Guelders, and from 1339 onwards Duke of Guelders, and Zutphen, in the Low Countries, from 1326 to 1343. He was the son of Reginald I of Guelders and Marguerite of Flanders.

  1. William (1364–1402)
  2. Reinald (c. 1365 – 1423)
  3. Joanna, married John V, Lord of Arkel. She succeeded her brother Reinald as Duke of Guelders and was the grandmother of Arnold, Duke of Guelders

Ancestry

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Joan of Valois, Countess of Hainaut sister of King Philip VI of France and the mother-in-law of Edward III

Joan of Valois was the second eldest daughter of the French prince Charles, Count of Valois, and his first wife, Margaret, Countess of Anjou. As the sister of King Philip VI of France and the mother-in-law of Edward III, she was ideally placed to act as mediator between them.

Maria van Arkel Great-grandmother of James III of Scotland

Maria van Arkel was the only daughter and heiress of Lord John V of Arkel and Joanna of Jülich. She inherited the title to Gelderland from her maternal uncle, Duke Reginald IV, and her son became Arnold, Duke of Gelderland. She was the paternal grandmother of Mary of Guelders, who became Queen of Scots.

Arnold, Duke of Guelders Duke of Guelders

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Eleanor of Woodstock 14th-century English princess and noblewoman

Eleanor of Woodstock was an English princess and Duchess consort of Guelders by marriage. She was regent of Guelders as the guardian of her minor son from 1343 until 1344.

Reginald III of Guelders was Duke of Guelders and Count of Zutphen from 1343 to 1361, and again in 1371. He was the son of Reginald II of Guelders and of Eleanor of Woodstock, daughter of Edward II of England.

John VI of Harcourt was a count of Harcourt. He was son of John V of Harcourt and Blanche of Ponthieu who was the sister of Jeanne of Ponthieu.

William I of Guelders and Jülich Duke of Guelders and Julich

William I of Guelders and Jülich KG was Duke of Guelders, as William I, from 1377 and Duke of Jülich, as William III, from 1393. William was known for his military activities, participating in the Prussian crusade five times and battling with neighbors in France and Brabant throughout his rule. His allies included Holy Roman Emperors, Charles IV and Wenceslaus, Richard II of England, and Conrad Zöllner von Rothenstein, the Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights. During his reign the duchies of Guelders and Jülich were temporarily unified.

Katherine of Bavaria, was the eldest child of Albert I, Duke of Bavaria and his first wife Margaret of Brieg. She was Duchess of Guelders and Jülich by her marriage to William I of Guelders and Jülich.

Reinald IV, Duke of Guelders and Jülich Duke of Guelders and Jülich

Reinald IV, Duke of Guelders and Jülich aka Reginald IV was the son of William II, Duke of Jülich and Maria of Guelders, daughter of Reinald II, Duke of Guelders.

Adolf, Duke of Jülich-Berg, was the first Duke of the combined duchies of Jülich and Berg. He was the son of William VII of Jülich, 1st Duke of Berg and Anna of the Palatinate.

William VII of Jülich, 1st Duke of Berg was born in Jülich, as the son of Gerhard VI of Jülich, Count of Berg and Ravensberg, and Margaret, daughter and heiress of Otto IV, Count of Ravensberg, and Margaret of Berg.

Edward, Duke of Guelders, Duke of Guelders and Count of Zutphen (1361–1371) was the youngest son of Rainald II of Guelders and his second wife, Eleanor of Woodstock, daughter of Edward II of England.

Gerhard VI of Jülich, Count of Berg and Ravensberg was the son of William V, Duke of Jülich and Joanna of Hainaut.

Walram, Count of Jülich was the second son of William IV, Count of Jülich and Richardis of Guelders, daughter of Gerard III, Count of Guelders.

Gerhard V of Jülich, Count of Jülich (1297–1328), was the youngest son of William IV, Count of Jülich and Richardis of Guelders, daughter of Gerard III, Count of Guelders.

Marie of Guelders was one of two pretenders to the title of Duchess of Guelders and Countess of Zutphen on behalf of her son during the War of the Guelderian Succession from 1371 to 1379. The war began after the deaths of her brothers, Reginald III of Guelders and Edward of Guelders. Edward died from wounds received at the Battle of Baesweiler, and Reginald, who was known as the fat, died months later. Succession was also claimed by Marie's sister, Mathilda, whose side was called the Heeckerens and were led by Frederik van Heeckeren van der Eze (1320-1386). Her party was called the Bronckhorsters and was led by Gijsbert V van Bronckhorst (1328-1356). Upon victory of her party, the title of Duke of Guelders went to her son, William.

References

  1. Walther Möller, Stammtafeln westdeutscher Adelsgeschlechter im Mittelalter (Darmstadt, 1922, reprint Verlag Degener & Co., 1995), Vol. 1, page 14.
William II, Duke of Jülich
Born:c. 1327 Died: 13 December 1393
Preceded by
William I
Duke of Jülich
13621393
Succeeded by
William III