William IX, Count of Poitiers

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William IX
William IX, Count of Poitiers.jpg
William IX, from an early 14th century genealogical tree
British Library Royal MS 14 B VI.
Count of Poitiers
Reign1153–1156
Born17 August 1153
Normandy, France
Died1156 (aged 2–3)
Wallingford Castle, Berkshire
Burial
Reading Abbey, Berkshire
House Plantagenet / Angevin
Father Henry II, King of England
Mother Eleanor, Duchess of Aquitaine

William (17 August 1153 – 1156) was the first son of King Henry II of England and Duchess Eleanor of Aquitaine. [1] He was born in Normandy on the same day that his father's rival, Eustace IV of Boulogne, died.

William either died aged 3 on 2 December 1156, [2] [3] or aged 2 in April 1156. [4] This was due to a seizure at Wallingford Castle, and he was buried in Reading Abbey at the feet of his great-grandfather Henry I. [4]

At the time of his death, William was reigning as Count of Poitiers, as his mother had ceded the county to him. For centuries, the dukes of Aquitaine had held this as one of their minor titles, so it had passed to Eleanor from her father; giving it to her son was effectively a revival of the title, separating it from the duchy. Some authorities say he also held the title of "Archbishop of York", but this is probably an error. His half-brother Geoffrey (died 1212), who was born a year before William, later held that office, causing the confusion.

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William IX, Count of Poitiers
Born: 17 August 1153 Died: April 1156
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Henry and Eleanor
Count of Poitiers
1153–1156
Succeeded by
Henry and Eleanor