William J. Crowe

Last updated

William Crowe
Adm William Crowe Jr.JPG
United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom
In office
June 2, 1994 September 20, 1997
President Bill Clinton
Preceded by Raymond G. H. Seitz
Succeeded by Philip Lader
Chair of the President's Intelligence Advisory Board
In office
January 20, 1993 May 26, 1994
President Bill Clinton
Preceded by Bobby Ray Inman (acting)
Succeeded by Les Aspin
Chair of the Intelligence Oversight Board
In office
January 20, 1993 May 26, 1994
President Bill Clinton
Preceded by James R. Thompson
Succeeded by Anthony S. Harrington
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
In office
October 1, 1985 September 30, 1989
President Ronald Reagan
George H. W. Bush
Deputy Robert T. Herres
Preceded by John William Vessey Jr.
Succeeded by Colin Powell
Commander of United States Pacific Command
In office
July 1, 1983 September 18, 1985
President Ronald Reagan
Preceded by Robert L. J. Long
Succeeded by Ronald J. Hays
Personal details
Born(1925-01-02)January 2, 1925
La Grange, Kentucky
DiedOctober 18, 2007(2007-10-18) (aged 82)
Bethesda, Maryland
Political party Republican
Education University of Oklahoma
United States Naval Academy (BS)
Stanford University (MEd)
Princeton University (MA, PhD)
Military service
AllegianceUnited States
Branch/service United States Navy
Years of service1946–1989
Rank Admiral
Commands Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
United States Pacific Command
United States Naval Forces Europe
Allied Forces Southern Europe
Submarine Division 31
USS Trout (SS-566)
Battles/wars Vietnam War
Awards Defense Distinguished Service Medal (4)
Navy Distinguished Service Medal (3)
Army Distinguished Service Medal
Air Force Distinguished Service Medal
Coast Guard Distinguished Service Medal
Legion of Merit (3)
Bronze Star Medal
Air Medal (7)
Presidential Medal of Freedom

William James Crowe Jr. (January 2, 1925 – October 18, 2007) was a United States Navy admiral who served as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff under Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush, and as the ambassador to the United Kingdom under President Bill Clinton.

Contents

Early life and education

Crowe was born in La Grange, Kentucky, on January 2, 1925. At the beginning of the Great Depression, Crowe's father moved the family to Oklahoma City. In June 1946, Crowe completed a war-accelerated course of study and graduated with the Class of 1947 from the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland.

Career

From 1954 to 1955, Crowe served as assistant to the naval aide of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. From 1956 to 1958, Crowe served as executive officer of the submarine USS Wahoo (SS-565). In 1958, he served as an aide to the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations. In 1960, Crowe took command of USS Trout (SS-566), homeported in Charleston, South Carolina, and served as commanding officer of that ship until 1962. From there, Crowe earned a master's degree in education at the Stanford Graduate School of Education. After turning down an invitation from Admiral Hyman G. Rickover to enter the Navy's nuclear power program, [1] Crowe earned a Ph.D. in politics from Princeton University in 1965 after completing a doctoral dissertation titled "The policy roots of the modern Royal Navy 1946-1963." [2] During the Vietnam War he was the senior adviser to the Vietnamese Riverine Force. In 1969, he took command of Submarine Division 31, homeported in San Diego, California.

A long string of assignments followed:

On July 10, 1985, Crowe was appointed by President Ronald Reagan to serve as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS). He continued to serve as CJCS through the Bush administration until 1989, when he retired from active duty. He was the first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to serve under the provisions of the Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986, where he as chairman became (not the collegial body of the Joint Chiefs of Staff), by statute, the principal military adviser to the president, the National Security Council, and the Secretary of Defense. In 1989, Army General Colin L. Powell succeeded him as CJCS.

Later life and death

After he retired in October 1989, Crowe returned to the University of Oklahoma and William J. Crowe chair in geopolitics. Crowe surprised politicians when he endorsed Bill Clinton in the presidential election of 1992. President Clinton named Crowe chairman of the President's Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board in 1993. In 1994, Clinton appointed Crowe the United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom, and he served in that capacity until 1997.

Crowe sat on the boards of Texaco, Merrill Lynch, Pfizer, Norfolk Southern Corporation, and General Dynamics. He also served on the board of Emergent BioSolutions (then Bioport), a company that provided controversial anthrax vaccinations to the U.S. military in the 1990s. The deal was approved by the Clinton administration, with which Crowe had a previous relationship. At the time of his death, Crowe served as the chairman of the board of Global Options, Inc., an international risk-management and business solutions company headquartered in Washington, D.C.

As he did at the University of Oklahoma in 1990–91, Crowe taught a seminar class on national security at the United States Naval Academy from 2000 to 2007.

In 2004, Crowe was among 27 retired diplomats and military commanders called Diplomats and Military Commanders for Change who publicly said the administration of President George W. Bush did not understand the world and was unable to handle "in either style or substance" the responsibilities of global leadership. [3] On June 16, 2004 the former senior diplomats and military commanders issued a statement against the Iraq War. [4]

Crowe died on October 18, 2007, at Bethesda Naval Hospital in Maryland at age 82 due to a heart condition. [5] His funeral was held on October 31, 2007, at the Naval Academy chapel; Bill Clinton spoke. Crowe was buried later that day in the United States Naval Academy Cemetery. As of 2016, he is one of only two deceased former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs to not be buried at Arlington National Cemetery. His predecessor, John William Vessey Jr. died in 2016 and was buried in Minnesota State Veterans Cemetery, Little Falls, Minnesota.

Legacy

In 2008, a fellowship was established in Crowe's honor at the University of Kentucky's Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce to support a former member of the U.S. armed forces who – like Crowe – is shifting from military to diplomatic service.

In 2009, the International Programs Center at the University of Oklahoma established the Admiral William J. Crowe Jr. Award. This award is presented to an outstanding International and Area Studies (IAS) graduate every spring semester. The award recognizes an IAS student who has demonstrated high academic achievement, a commitment to public service, and a desire to pursue a career in global affairs. Also in 2009, the Xbox/ PS2 game, Heroes of the Pacific, was released. The main character's name is also William Crowe, though whether or not this was inspired by the real-life Crowe is unknown.

Personal life

Crowe was married to Shirley Grennell in 1954. They had three children.

Dates of rank

Ensign Lieutenant junior grade Lieutenant Lieutenant commander Commander Captain
O-1O-2O-3O-4O-5O-6
US Navy O1 insignia.svg US Navy O2 insignia.svg US Navy O3 insignia.svg US Navy O4 insignia.svg US Navy O5 insignia.svg US Navy O6 insignia.svg
June 5, 1946June 5, 1949June 1, 1952January 1, 1958July 1, 1962July 1, 1967
Rear admiral (lower half) Rear admiral (upper half) Vice admiral Admiral
O-7O-8O-9O-10
N/A* US Navy O8 insignia.svg US Navy O9 insignia.svg US Navy O10 insignia.svg
June 1, 1973August 1, 1977September 26, 1977June 6, 1980

Awards and recognition

Crowe was awarded Doctor of Laws (LL.D.) honorary degrees from numerous universities, including University of Liverpool, The George Washington University, and Knox College.

In 1989 Crowe appeared in an episode of the television sitcom Cheers (Season 7, Episode 17 "Hot Rocks"), where he played himself. [6]

On 1990 he was the first recipient of the Distinguished Sea Service Award of Naval Order of the United States.

In 1993 Crowe published his memoirs in the book The Line of Fire: From Washington to the Gulf, the Politics and Battles of the New Military.

Crowe received four Defense Distinguished Service Medals and numerous military decorations from heads of state. In 1998, the American Atatürk Association honored Crowe with the "Atatürk Peace and Democracy Award". [7] Following his retirement from the Navy, he was awarded a 2000 Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States' highest civilian honor. [8] [9]

Awards and decorations

Badges
Submarine Officer badge.jpg Submarine Warfare Insignia
Joint Chiefs of Staff seal.svg Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Identification Badge
U.S. military decorations
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svg
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svg
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svg
Defense Distinguished Service Medal ribbon.svg
Defense Distinguished Service Medal (with three Oak Leaf Clusters)
1 golden star.svg
1 golden star.svg
Navy Distinguished Service ribbon.svg
Navy Distinguished Service Medal (with two gold stars)
U.S. Army Distinguished Service Medal ribbon.svg Army Distinguished Service Medal
Air Force Distinguished Service ribbon.svg Air Force Distinguished Service Medal
Coast Guard Distinguished Service ribbon.svg Coast Guard Distinguished Service Medal
1 golden star.svg
1 golden star.svg
Legion of Merit ribbon.svg
Legion of Merit (with 2 gold award stars)
"V" device, gold.svg
Bronze Star ribbon.svg
Bronze Star with Valor device
Air Medal ribbon.svg Award numeral 7.png Air Medal with bronze award numeral 7 (strike/flight awards)
U.S. Unit Awards
Navy Unit Commendation ribbon.svg Navy Unit Commendation
U.S. non-military decorations
Presidential Medal of Freedom (ribbon).png Presidential Medal of Freedom
U.S. service and campaign awards
China Service Medal ribbon.svg China Service Medal
American Campaign Medal ribbon.svg American Campaign Medal
World War II Victory Medal ribbon.svg World War II Victory Medal
Army of Occupation ribbon.svg Navy Occupation Service Medal with Pacific clasp
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
National Defense Service Medal ribbon.svg
National Defense Service Medal with bronze service star
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Vietnam Service Medal ribbon.svg
Vietnam Service Medal with 1 campaign star
Humanitarian Service ribbon.svg Humanitarian Service Medal
Foreign military decorations, unit and campaign awards
Vietnam Navy Distinguished Service Order Ribbon-Second Class.svg Republic of Vietnam Navy Distinguished Service Order 2nd Class
Vietnamese Gallantry Cross, with palm.svg Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm and Bronze Star
Vietnam Armed Forces Honor Medal ribbon-First Class.svg Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces Honor Medal First Class
Tong-il Security Medel Ribbon.svg Republic of Korea Order of the National Security Merit Tong-Il Medal
Cordone di gran Croce OMRI BAR.svg
Knight of the Grand Cross of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic
Order of the Crown of Thailand - 1st Class (Thailand) ribbon.svg Knight Grand Cross of the Most Noble Order of the Crown of Thailand
Vietnam gallantry cross unit award-3d.svg Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation
Vietnam Campaign Medal ribbon with 60- clasp.svg Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal

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References

  1. "Former Joint Chiefs Chair Crowe Dies". Press Association. October 18, 2007. Archived from the original on June 9, 2007. Retrieved June 25, 2018.
  2. Crowe, William J. (1965). The policy roots of the modern Royal Navy 1946-1963.
  3. Brownstein, Ronald (June 13, 2004). "Retired Officials Say Bush Must Go". Los Angeles Times . Retrieved June 25, 2018.
  4. Diplomats and Military Commanders for Change Official Statement Archived October 11, 2007, at the Wayback Machine (June 16, 2004)
  5. "Former JCS chairman Crowe dies at 82". Air Force Times . October 18, 2007.
  6. William J. Crowe Jr. on IMDb
  7. "Admiral Crowe Receives Ataturk Award". Turkish Press Review. April 28, 1998. Archived from the original on December 10, 2000.
  8. "Presidential Medal of Freedom Recipients". U.S. Senate. Archived from the original on July 14, 2004.
  9. List of Presidential Medal of Freedom recipients#Military
Military offices
Preceded by
Robert Long
Commander of United States Pacific Command
1983–1985
Succeeded by
Ronald Hays
Preceded by
John Vessey
Chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
1985–1989
Succeeded by
Colin Powell
Government offices
Preceded by
Bobby Inman
Acting
Chair of the President's Intelligence Advisory Board
1993–1994
Succeeded by
Les Aspin
Preceded by
Jim Thompson
Chair of the Intelligence Oversight Board
1993–1994
Succeeded by
Anthony Harrington
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Raymond Seitz
United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom
1994–1997
Succeeded by
Philip Lader