William Kerr, 3rd Marquess of Lothian

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William Kerr, 3rd Marquess of Lothian, KT (c.1690 28 July 1767) was a Scottish nobleman, styled Master of Jedburgh from 1692 to 1703 and Lord Jedburgh from 1703 to 1722.

Contents

Early life

He was the son of William Kerr, 2nd Marquess of Lothian and Lady Jean Campbell. [1]

Lieutenant-General William Kerr, 2nd Marquess of Lothian, was a Scottish peer who held a number of minor military and political offices. He was known by the courtesy title of Lord Newbattle until 1692, when he succeeded as Lord Jedburgh, then as Marquess of Lothian when his father died in 1703.

Career

Although his title of Lord Jedburgh is generally regarded as a courtesy title, he voted at the election of Scots representative peers under that name in 1712.

A courtesy title is a title that does not have legal significance but rather is used through custom or courtesy, particularly, in the context of nobility, the titles used by children of members of the nobility.

In the United Kingdom, representative peers were those peers elected by the members of the Peerage of Scotland and the Peerage of Ireland to sit in the British House of Lords. Until 1999, all members of the Peerage of England held the right to sit in the House of Lords; they did not elect a limited group of representatives. All peers who were created after 1707 as Peers of Great Britain and after 1801 as Peers of the United Kingdom held the same right to sit in the House of Lords.

He succeeded to the Marquessate of Lothian in 1722 and was elected a representative peer in 1731, sitting in the House of Lords until 1761. From 1732 to 1738, Lothian was Lord High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, and he was appointed a Knight of the Thistle in 1734. From 1739 until his resignation in 1756, he was Lord Clerk Register. [1]

House of Lords

The House of Lords, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Membership is granted by appointment or else by heredity or official function. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled.

Lord High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland

The Lord High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland is the British Sovereign's personal representative to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, reflecting the Church's role as the national church of Scotland, and the Sovereign's role as protector and member of that Church.

The office of Lord Clerk Register is the oldest surviving Great Officer of State in Scotland, with origins in the 13th century.

Personal life

On 7 December 1711, he married Margaret Nicolson, daughter of Sir Thomas Nicolson, 1st Baronet and Margaret (née Nicolson) Hamilton Nicolson. [2] His wife's mother was previously married to James Hamilton of Ballincrieff, with whom she had Alexander Hamilton of Ballincrieff. [2] They had three children: [1]

Alexander Hamilton of Innerwick and of Ballencrieff, Linlithgow was a Scottish politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1727 to 1741.

Lord Robert Kerr was a Scottish nobleman of the Clan Kerr and the second son of William Kerr, 3rd Marquess of Lothian.

Battle of Culloden Final confrontation of the Jacobite rising of 1745

The Battle of Culloden was the final confrontation of the Jacobite rising of 1745. On 16 April 1746, the Jacobite forces of Charles Edward Stuart were decisively defeated by Hanoverian forces commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands.

His first wife died on 30 September 1759 at Newbattle Abbey and was buried there. He subsequently married his cousin Jean Janet Kerr, daughter of Lord Charles Kerr of Cramond and Janet Murray, on 1 October 1760, by whom he had no issue. Lothian died at Lothian House, Canongate, Edinburgh, and was buried at Newbattle; his wife died at Lothian House on 26 December 1787. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Paul, Sir James Balfour (1908). The Scots Peerage: Innermeath-Mar. D. Douglas. p. 480.
  2. 1 2 Stevenson, J. H.; Hallen, The Rev. A. W. Cornelius (1889). Northern Notes & Queries: or The Scottish Antiquary, Vol. III. Edinburgh: W. Green and Sons. p. 54. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  3. The Letters of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford, Vol. II 1744-1753 (1840 pub. Richard Bentley), page 136 & footnote, Letter to Sir Horace Mann, 1st August 1746: ..the Marquis of Lothian in weepers for his son who fell at Culloden... Footnote: William Ker, third Marquis of Lothian. Lord Robert Ker, who was killed at Culloden, was his second son. - D.
Political offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Loudoun
Lord High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland
17321738
Succeeded by
The Earl of Hyndford
Preceded by
The Earl of Selkirk
Lord Clerk Register
17391756
Succeeded by
Alexander Campbell
Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
William Kerr
Marquess of Lothian
17221767
Succeeded by
William Kerr