William Martin Nygaard

Last updated
William M. Nygaard
William Nygaard d.e.jpg
Born
William Martin Nygaard

(1865-02-06)6 February 1865
Kristiansand, Norway
Died19 December 1952(1952-12-19) (aged 87)
Nationality Norwegian
OccupationPublisher and politician

William Martin Nygaard (6 February 1865 – 19 December 1952) was a Norwegian publisher and politician.

Norway Country in Northern Europe

Norway, officially the Kingdom of Norway, is a Nordic country in Northern Europe whose territory comprises the western and northernmost portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula; the remote island of Jan Mayen and the archipelago of Svalbard are also part of the Kingdom of Norway. The Antarctic Peter I Island and the sub-Antarctic Bouvet Island are dependent territories and thus not considered part of the kingdom. Norway also lays claim to a section of Antarctica known as Queen Maud Land.

A politician is a person active in party politics, or a person holding or seeking office in government. Politicians propose, support and create laws or policies that govern the land and, by extension, its people. Broadly speaking, a "politician" can be anyone who seeks to achieve political power in any bureaucratic institution.

Contents

Personal life

Nygaard was born in Kristiansand as the son of educator and linguist Marius Nygaard (1838–1912) and his wife Elisabeth "Elise" Martin (1842–1923) [1] and brother of Kristen Brunfeldt Nygaard and Finn Nygaard. He married to Constance Wiel, and the couple had seven children, among them Mads Wiel Nygaard, who was the father of William Nygaard, and Andreas Melchior Wiel Nygaard. Their daughter Constance Wiel Nygaard married physician Thomas Schram.

Kristiansand City in Norway

Kristiansand, historically spelled Christianssand and Christiansand, is a city and municipality in Norway. It is the fifth largest city in Norway and the municipality is the sixth largest in Norway, with a population of 88,598 as of June 2016. In addition to the city itself, Statistics Norway counts four other densely populated areas in the municipality: Skålevik in Flekkerøy with a population of 3,526 in the Vågsbygd borough, Strai with a population of 1,636 in the Grim borough, Justvik with a population of 1,803 in the Lund borough, and Tveit with a population of 1,396 in the Oddernes borough. Kristiansand is divided into five boroughs: Grim, which is located northwest in Kristiansand with a population of 15,000; Kvadraturen, which is the centre and downtown Kristiansand with a population of 5,200; Lund, the second largest borough; Oddernes, a borough located in the west; and Vågsbygd, the largest borough with a population of 36,000, located in the southwest.

Marius Nygaard (academic) Norwegian linguist

Marius Nygaard was a Norwegian educator and linguist.

William Nygaard Norwegian publisher

William Nygaard is the retired head of the Norwegian publishing company Aschehoug. He is chairman of the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation.

In 1894 he bought Drammensveien 99 and moved in with his family. [2] It is in the garden outside Drammensveien 99 the annual garden party of Aschehoug takes place each summer.

H. Aschehoug & Co. , commonly known as Aschehoug,(pronounced [²ɑskəhæʉ]) is one of the largest independent publishing companies in Norway, founded in 1872. Headquartered in Oslo, the publishing house has 480 employees. The Aschehoug group also comprises other publishing houses owned partially or wholly by Aschehoug. Aschehoug can be directly translated to "ash hill."

Publisher

He was employed in H. Aschehoug & Co's bookstore in Kristiania in 1887. [1] In 1888, together with Thorstein Lambrechts, he bought the bookstore and the publishing house. Then, in 1900 he became the sole owner of the publishing house and changed the name of the company to H. Aschehoug & Co (W. Nygaard). He was chief executive of the publishing house until 1940 when his son Mads Wiel Nygaard took over as chief executive. William Martin Nygaard continued as chairman of the board.

Oslo Place in Østlandet, Norway

Oslo is the capital and most populous city of Norway. It constitutes both a county and a municipality. Founded in the year 1040 as Ánslo, and established as a kaupstad or trading place in 1048 by Harald Hardrada, the city was elevated to a bishopric in 1070 and a capital under Haakon V of Norway around 1300. Personal unions with Denmark from 1397 to 1523 and again from 1536 to 1814 reduced its influence. After being destroyed by a fire in 1624, during the reign of King Christian IV, a new city was built closer to Akershus Fortress and named Christiania in the king's honour. It was established as a municipality (formannskapsdistrikt) on 1 January 1838. The city functioned as a co-official capital during the 1814 to 1905 Union between Sweden and Norway. In 1877, the city's name was respelled Kristiania in accordance with an official spelling reform – a change that was taken over by the municipal authorities only in 1897. In 1925 the city, after incorporating the village retaining its former name, was renamed Oslo.

Thorstein Aschehoug Lambrechts was a Norwegian bookseller.

In 1895 William Nygaard initiated the founding of the Norwegian Publishers Association, serving as chairman from 1895 to 1922 and 1925 to 1929. [1]

Politician

William Nygaard was a member of Kristiania city council from 1908 to 1919. In 1910 he was one of the founders of the political party Liberal Left Party, chairing the local chapter in Kristiania until 1916. [1] He was a central board member of the party from 1912 to 1915. [3] He was elected to the Parliament of Norway in 1921 for the term 19221924, representing the constituency Kristiania. He served only one term. [1] He had previously been elected as deputy representative from Hammersborg in 1915. [4] He also fielded as the Liberal Left candidate in Uranienborg in the 1912 election, but only carried 81 votes and lost spectacularly. [5]

1921 Norwegian parliamentary election

Parliamentary elections were held in Norway on 24 October 1921. This was the first election to use proportional representation, rather than the previous two round system. The result was a victory for the Conservative Party-Free-minded Liberal Party alliance, which won 57 of the 150 seats in the Storting.

1915 Norwegian parliamentary election

Parliamentary elections were held in Norway on 21 October 1915, with a second round between 4 and 11 November. The result was a victory for the Liberal Party, which won 74 of the 123 seats in the Storting.

1912 Norwegian parliamentary election

Parliamentary elections were held in Norway on 21 October 1912, with a second round held between 4 and 11 November. The result was a victory for the alliance of the Liberal Party and the Labour Democrats, which won 76 of the 123 seats in the Storting.

He was also a member of the board of Oslo City Museum (1902–1922), the Norwegian Booksellers Association (1905–1918), Saugbrugsforeningen (1914–1932), Christiania Bank og Kreditkasse (1917–1922), Nationaltheatret (1922–1923), Vinmonopolet (1929–1932) and the Norwegian Museum of Decorative Arts and Design. [1]

Related Research Articles

Kristine Bonnevie Norwegian biologist and professor

Kristine Elisabeth Heuch Bonnevie was a Norwegian biologist and Norway's first female professor. Her fields of research were cytology, genetics and embryology.

Einar Skjæraasen Norwegian author and poet

Einar Skjæraasen was a Norwegian author and poet, a longtime resident of Trysil.

Martin Julius Halvorsen Norwegian politician

Martin Julius Halvorsen was a Norwegian newspaper editor and politician for the Labour and Social Democratic Labour parties.

Randolf Arnesen was a Norwegian trade unionist, copperativist and politician for the Labour and Social Democratic Labour parties.

Kristian Ludvig Andreassen Hopp was a Norwegian educator and politician for the Labour Party.

Carl Severin Bentzen, often called C. S. Bentzen was a Norwegian tailor and politician for the Labour and Social Democratic Labour parties.

Sverre Iversen Norwegian politician

Sverre Johan Iversen was Norwegian trade unionist, civil servant and politician for the Labour and Social Democratic Labour parties.

Karl Amundsen was a Norwegian politician for the Labour and Communist parties.

Ivar Marius Færder was a Norwegian newspaper editor and politician for the Labour and Communist parties.

Andreas Johannesen Hemma was a Norwegian farmer and politician.

Ragna Hørbye Norwegian politician

Ragna Hørbye, née Heyerdahl was a Norwegian politician for the Liberal Left Party.

Thore Embretsen Myrvang was a Norwegian educator and politician for the Liberal Party and the Labour Democrats.

Arnold Hazeland Norwegian judge

Arnold Mathew Johan Philip Hazeland was a Norwegian attorney, Supreme Court Justice as an Anarchist in the late 1920's, and eventually later on a politician for the Labour Party. Hazeland worked on several translations of the works of Russian scientist and anarchist, Peter A. Kropotkin. What became of his manuscripts is not known.

Vigleik Trygve Sundt Norwegian attorney, genealogist and politician

Vigleik Trygve Sundt was a Norwegian attorney, genealogist and politician for the Liberal Party.

Søren Tjønneland (1868–1954) was a Norwegian mason, trade unionist and politician for the Labour Party and Social Democratic Labour parties.

Thomas Schram Norwegian physician

Thomas Andreas Finn Schram was a Norwegian physician, best known for his endeavor against tuberculosis.

Johannes Onsager Brecke was a Norwegian businessperson and politician for the Conservative Party.

Lorents Mørkved was a Norwegian farmer and politician for the Liberal Party.

David Pedersen Kvile was a Norwegian teacher, farmer and politician for the Liberal Party.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 William Martin Nygaard Norwegian Social Science Data Services (NSD)
  2. The record for Drammensveien 99 in the 1900 census
  3. Carstens, Svein (1987). Det Frisinnede Venstre 1909–1927 (in Norwegian). Trondheim: University of Trondheim.
  4. "Norges Offisielle Statistikk. VI. 65. Stortingsvalget 1915" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  5. "Norges Offisielle Statistikk. V. 189. Stortingsvalget 1912" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.