William Morgan (of Machen and Tredegar)

Last updated

Sir

William Morgan
Bornc. 1640
Died28 April 1680
Nationality Welsh
ChildrenBlanche Morgan
John Morgan (of Rhiwpera)

Sir William Morgan (c. 1640 – 28 April 1680) was a Welsh landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons of England between 1659 and 1680.

Welsh people nation and ethnic group native to Wales

The Welsh are a Celtic nation and ethnic group native to, or otherwise associated with, Wales, Welsh culture, Welsh history and the Welsh language. Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, and the majority of people living in Wales are British citizens.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Contents

Life

William Morgan was the eldest son and heir of Sir Thomas Morgan (died 1664), and his second wife Elizabeth Wyndham daughter of Francis Wyndham of Sandhill Park, Bishop's Lydeard, Somerset. His brother was Sir John Morgan. William was a student at Queen's College, Oxford in 1656 and at Gray's Inn in 1658. [1]

Sir Thomas Morgan was a Welsh politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1654.

John Morgan (merchant) merchant, sheriff and politician from Wales born circa 1641

John Morgan was a Welsh merchant, sheriff and MP.

Grays Inn one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honourable Society of Gray's Inn, commonly known as Gray's Inn, is one of the four Inns of Court in London. To be called to the bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales, a person must belong to one of these Inns. Located at the intersection of High Holborn and Gray's Inn Road in Central London, the Inn is both a professional body and a provider of office accommodation (chambers) for many barristers. It is ruled by a governing council called "Pension", made up of the Masters of the Bench, and led by the Treasurer, who is elected to serve a one-year term. The Inn is known for its gardens, or Walks, which have existed since at least 1597.

He was first returned as a Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire to the Third Protectorate Parliament in 1659. He was proposed as a Knight of the Royal Oak for Monmouthshire in 1660, and continued to represent the county in the House of Commons until his death. [2]

Monmouthshire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of Parliament of England from 1536 until 1707, of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1801, and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs).

Third Protectorate Parliament

The Third Protectorate Parliament sat for one session, from 27 January 1659 until 22 April 1659, with Chaloner Chute and Thomas Bampfylde as the Speakers of the House of Commons. It was a bicameral Parliament, with an Upper House having a power of veto over the Commons.

Monmouthshire (historic) one of the thirteen historic counties of Wales

Monmouthshire, also known as the County of Monmouth, is one of thirteen historic counties of Wales and a former administrative county. It corresponds approximately to the present principal areas of Monmouthshire, Blaenau Gwent, Newport and Torfaen, and those parts of Caerphilly and Cardiff east of the Rhymney River.

Family

Tredegar House Tredegar House 1 (16984431737).jpg
Tredegar House

Morgan married his first cousin Blanche Morgan, daughter of his father's sister, Elizabeth Morgan, and Sir William Morgan, on 4 November 1661. He rebuilt Tredegar House on a very grand scale, with the help of his wife's huge dowry. Blanche inherited her father's estates at Dderw, Brecknockshire in 1658, after the death of her brother William. This gave Morgan and his descendants considerable political influence in the county for generations. [3] His children by Blanche included two sons, Thomas and John, and a daughter, Blanche.

William Morgan was a Welsh lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1628 to 1649.

Tredegar House 17th-century country house in Coedkernew, Newport, Wales

Tredegar House is a 17th-century Charles II-era country house mansion in Coedkernew, at the western edge of the city of Newport, Wales. For over five hundred years it was home to the Morgan family, later Lords Tredegar; one of the most powerful and influential families in the area. Described as "The grandest and most exuberant country house" in Monmouthshire and one of the "outstanding houses of the Restoration period in the whole of Britain", the mansion stands in a reduced landscaped garden of 90 acres (0.36 km2) forming the non-residential part of Tredegar Park. The property became a Grade I listed building on 3 March 1952 and has been under the care of the National Trust since March 2012.

Brecknockshire historic county of Wales

Brecknockshire, also known as the County of Brecknock, Breconshire, or the County of Brecon is one of thirteen historic counties of Wales, and a former administrative county. Named after its county town of Brecon, the county is mountainous and primarily rural.

After the death of Blanche on 23 March 1673, Morgan married Elizabeth Dayrell, widow of Sir Francis Dayrell and daughter of William Lewis of Bletchington, Oxfordshire. [1] However, Elizabeth proved to be of unsound mind. Morgan arranged dual marriages between his eldest son, Thomas, and Martha, daughter of Sir Edward Mansel; and between his daughter Blanche (d. 1682) and Mansel's eldest son, Edward. [4]

However, William did not live to see the marriages carried out, dying in London in 1680. Blanche died before marrying Mansel's son, who died unmarried. However, Thomas, who inherited William's estates, did marry Martha Mansel.

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References

  1. 1 2 History of Parliament Online - Morgan, William
  2. Williams, William Retlaw (1895). The Parliamentary History of Wales. pp. 125–126. Retrieved 17 October 2007.
  3. "Dictionary of Welsh Biography Online" . Retrieved 17 October 2007.
  4. "Morgan Family History" . Retrieved 17 October 2007.
Parliament of England
Preceded by
John Nicholas
Edward Herbert
Nathaniel Waterhouse
Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire
1659–1680
With: John Nicholas 1659–1660
Henry, Lord Herbert 1660–1667
Sir Trevor Williams 1667–1679, 1679–1680
Charles, Lord Herbert 1679
Succeeded by
Sir Trevor Williams
Sir Edward Morgan, Bt