William Northmore

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William Northmore (1690–1735), of Northmore House, Okehampton and Cleve, near Exeter, Devon, was a British landowner and Tory politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1713 and 1735.

Northmore House, built in 1685 is now the Town Hall in Okehampton Okehampton town hall.jpg
Northmore House, built in 1685 is now the Town Hall in Okehampton

Morthmore was baptized on 1 July 1690, the only son. of William Northmore of Throwleigh, near Okehampton and his wife Anne Hutton, daughter of Rev. William Hutton, sometime rector of Northlew, near Okehampton, and of St. Kew, Cornwall. He married by a settlement dated 25 August 1711, his cousin Anne Northmore daughter of Thomas Northmore of Cleve. In 1713 he inherited Cleve from his uncle and father-in-law, who held many of the Monck estates in mortgage and directed in his will that they be sold for the benefit of his nephew and his wife. [1]

Thomas Northmore (died 1713) English politician

Thomas Northmore (c.1643-1713) of Cleve in the parish of St Thomas, Exeter, in Devon was a Barrister-at-Law, a Master in Chancery and a Member of Parliament for Okehampton in Devon 1695-1708.

Northmore was some time Recorder of Okehampton, and was returned as Tory Member of Parliament for Okehampton at the 1713 British general election. He was returned again at the 1715 British general election, and voted against the Government in all recorded divisions.

Okehampton was a parliamentary borough in Devon, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons in 1301 and 1313, then continuously from 1640 to 1832, when the borough was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

1713 British general election

The 1713 British general election produced further gains for the governing Tory party. Since 1710 Robert Harley had led a government appointed after the downfall of the Whig Junto, attempting to pursue a moderate and non-controversial policy, but had increasingly struggled to deal with the extreme Tory backbenchers who were frustrated by the lack of support for anti-dissenter legislation. The government remained popular with the electorate, however, having helped to end the War of the Spanish Succession and agreeing on the Treaty of Utrecht. The Tories consequently made further gains against the Whigs, making Harley's job even more difficult. Contests were held in 94 constituencies in England and Wales, some 35 per cent of the total, reflecting a decline in partisan tension and the Whigs' belief that they were unlikely to win anyway.

1715 British general election

The 1715 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 5th Parliament of Great Britain to be held, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. In October 1714, soon after George I had arrived in London after ascending to the throne, he dismissed the Tory cabinet and replaced it with one almost entirely composed of Whigs, as they were responsible for securing his succession. The election of 1715 saw the Whigs win an overwhelming majority in the House of Commons, and afterwards virtually all Tories in central or local government were purged, leading to a period of Whig ascendancy lasting almost fifty years during which Tories were almost entirely excluded from office.

Northmore succeeded his father in 1716. His first wife Anne died in 1717 and he married as his second wife in May 1720, Florence Chichester, daughter of Sir Arthur Chichester, 3rd Baronet. He did not stand at the 1722 British general election. His wife Florence died in 1726.

Sir Arthur Chichester, 3rd Baronet (1689–1718), was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons in two periods between 1685 and 1718.

1722 British general election

The 1722 British general election elected members to serve in the House of Commons of the 6th Parliament of Great Britain. This was the fifth such election since the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. Thanks to the Septennial Act of 1715, which swept away the maximum three-year life of a parliament created by the Meeting of Parliament Act 1694, it followed some seven years after the previous election, that of 1715.

Northmore resumed his seat at Okehampton at the 1727 British general election, voting with the Opposition against the Hessians in 1730 and the excise bill in 1733. He was returned again at the 1734 British general election. [2]

1727 British general election

The 1727 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 7th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. The election was triggered by the death of King George I; at the time, it was the convention to hold new elections following the succession of a new monarch. The Tories, led in the House of Commons by William Wyndham, and under the direction of Bolingbroke, who had returned to the country in 1723 after being pardoned for his role in the Jacobite rising of 1715, lost further ground to the Whigs, rendering them ineffectual and largely irrelevant to practical politics. A group known as the Patriot Whigs, led by William Pulteney, who were disenchanted with Walpole's government and believed he was betraying Whig principles, had been formed prior to the election. Bolingbroke and Pulteney had not expected the next election to occur until 1729, and were consequently caught unprepared and failed to make any gains against the government party.

1734 British general election

The 1734 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 8th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. Robert Walpole's increasingly unpopular Whig government lost ground to the Tories and the opposition Whigs, but still had a secure majority in the House of Commons. The Patriot Whigs were joined in opposition by a group of Whig members led by Lord Cobham known as the Cobhamites, or 'Cobham's Cubs'

Northmore married as his third wife on 11 September 1734, Elizabeth Oxenham, daughter of William Oxenham of Oxenham, Devon, He died on 17 March 1735 without children from any of his three marriages. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "NORTHMORE, William (1690-1735), of Northmore House, Okehampton, and Cleve, nr. Exeter, Devon". History of Parliament Online (1690-1715). Retrieved 15 March 2019.
  2. "NORTHMORE, William (1690-1735), of Northmore House, Okehampton and Cleve, nr. Exeter, Devon". History of Parliament Online (1715-1754). Retrieved 15 March 2019.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
John Dibble
Christopher Harris
Member of Parliament for Okehampton
17131722
With: Christopher Harris
Succeeded by
Robert Pitt
John Crowley
Preceded by
Robert Pitt
John Crowley
Member of Parliament for Okehampton
1727–1735
With: Thomas Pitt
Succeeded by
George Lyttelton
Thomas Pitt