William Scoresby Bay

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William Scoresby Bay is a coastal embayment at the western side of William Scoresby Archipelago, Antarctica. It is 8 kilometres (5 mi) long and 5.6 kilometres (3.5 mi) wide, with shores marked by steep rock headlands and snow-free hills rising to 210 m. The practical limits of the bay are extended 6.4 kilometres (4 mi) northward, from the coast by island groups located along its east and west margin. Discovered in February 1936 by Discovery Investigations (DI) personnel on the RSS William Scoresby, for which the bay was named. [1] The bay separates the Kemp Coast to the east from the Mawson Coast to the west. The Hobbs Islands sit 19 kilometres (10 nmi) northeast.

Sperring Point ( 67°24′S59°31′E / 67.400°S 59.517°E / -67.400; 59.517 ) is a rocky point about midway along the west side of the bay. Like the bay, it was discovered and named by DI personnel in February 1936. [2]

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The Mawson Coast is that portion of the coast of Mac. Robertson Land, Antarctica, lying between William Scoresby Bay, at 59°34′E, and Murray Monolith, at 66°54′E. The coast was sighted during the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE), 1929–30, under Sir Douglas Mawson. Further exploration and landings at Cape Bruce and Scullin Monolith were made during BANZARE, 1930–31. Mawson Coast was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia after Mawson in recognition of his great contribution to Antarctic exploration.

Edward VIII Bay is a bay about 32 kilometres (20 mi) in extent, located between Edward VIII Plateau and the Øygarden Group of islands in Antarctica. The head of the bay is occupied by the Edward VIII Ice Shelf. The bay was discovered in 1936 by Discovery Investigations personnel on the RRS William Scoresby, and named for Edward VIII, then King of the United Kingdom.

Stefansson Bay is a bay indenting the coast for 16 kilometres (10 mi) between Law Promontory and Fold Island. Mawson of the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) applied the name to a sweep of the coast west of Cape Wilkins which he observed on about February 18, 1931. Exploration by DI personnel on the William Scoresby, 1936, and the Lars Christensen expedition 1936–37, defined this section of the coast more accurately. It was named for Vilhjalmur Stefansson, Arctic explorer.

Enderby Land projecting landmass of Antarctica

Enderby Land is a projecting landmass of Antarctica. Its shore extends from Shinnan Glacier at about 67°55′S44°38′E to William Scoresby Bay at 67°24′S59°34′E, approximately 124 of the earth's longitude. It was first documented in western and eastern literature in February 1831 by John Biscoe aboard the whaling brig Tula, and named after the Enderby Brothers of London, the ship's owners who encouraged their captains to combine exploration with sealing.

Cumberland West Bay is a bay forming the western arm of Cumberland Bay, South Georgia. It is entered southward of Larsen Point, where it is 2.5 miles (4 km) wide, and extends 7 miles (11 km) in a southwest direction. It is separated from Cumberland East Bay by Thatcher Peninsula. Papua Beach is situated on its southeast shore.

Ives Tongue is a narrow tongue of land projecting from an island between Fold Island and the coast of Kemp Land, Antarctica. It was discovered and named in February 1936 by a Discovery Investigations expedition on the RRS William Scoresby.

Stillwell Hills is a group of largely snow-free rocky hills composed of banded gneisses and including Kemp Peak and Lealand Bluff, extending along the southwest side of William Scoresby Bay. This area was explored by Discovery Investigations personnel on the RSS William Scoresby in February 1936, and by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936–37, the latter group taking air photos used to map these hills for the first time. Geologic investigation of the area was made by Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) in 1961. Named by ANCA for Dr. Frank Leslie Stillwell, geologist with Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE), 1911–14, who derived a theory of metamorphic differentiation from banded gneisses of the same type on George V Coast.

Lealand Bluff is a high rounded bluff in Stillwell Hills at the southwest corner of William Scoresby Bay in the eastern part of Enderby Land. Named by Discovery Investigations personnel on the RSS William Scoresby who charted this area in 1936.

William Scoresby Archipelago is a group of islands which extends northward from the coast just east of William Scoresby Bay, Antarctica. The more important islands in the group are Bertha, Islay, Couling, and the Sheehan Islands. Most of the islands and features in this archipelago were discovered in February 1936 by Discovery Investigations (DI) personnel on the RSS William Scoresby. They named the group after their ship.

Fold Island

Fold Island, also known as Foldøya is an offshore island north of Ives Tongue, 11 kilometres (6 nmi) long and 6 kilometres (3 nmi) wide, which, with smaller islands south, separate Stefansson Bay to the west from William Scoresby Bay to the east. This feature was seen by Discovery Investigations (DI) personnel on the RSS William Scoresby in February 1936, who mapped it as part of the mainland. It was determined to be an island and named Foldøya by Norwegian cartographers who charted this area from aerial photographs taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition (LCE) in January–February 1937.

Øygarden Group

Øygarden Group is a group of rocky, irregular islands in Antarctica which extends about 20 kilometres (11 nmi) in an east-west direction, lying in the southern part of the entrance to Edward VIII Bay. First sighted in February 1936 by Discovery Investigations personnel on the RSS William Scoresby, and considered by them to be part of the mainland. They were charted as islands by Norwegian cartographers from aerial photographs taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition in January–February 1937, and named Øygarden, a descriptive term for a protective chain of islands lying along and off the coast.

Blackrock Head is a conspicuous coastal rock outcrop on the eastern part of Law Promontory, 3 nautical miles (6 km) northwest of Tryne Point in Antarctica. It was discovered in February 1936 by Discovery Investigations personnel on the William Scoresby and so named by them for its black, rocky appearance.

Borradaile Island

Borradaile Island is one of the Balleny Islands. It was the site of the first landing south of the Antarctic Circle, and features the "remarkable pinnacle" called Beale Pinnacle, near Cape Beale on its south-eastern coast, and Cape Scoresby on its north-western coast.

Warnock Islands is a group of small offshore islands lying 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) south and southwest of Dales Island at the north end of William Scoresby Archipelago. Discovered and named in February 1936 by DI personnel on the William Scoresby.

West Stack is a coastal rock outcrop which rises to 120 m on the west side of Hoseason Glacier, 14 nautical miles (26 km) southeast of Edward VIII Bay. Discovered in February 1936 by DI personnel on the William Scoresby, and probably so named by them because of its distinctive appearance and association with nearby East Stack.

Patricia Islands

Patricia Islands are three small islands 28 kilometres (15 nmi) southwest of Austnes Point in the west part of Edward VIII Bay. Discovered and named in February 1936 by DI personnel on the William Scoresby. The islands were mapped in greater detail by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936–37. They were visited by an ANARE party under R.G. Dovers in 1954.

Mount Saint Michael is a prominent rocky point at the west side of the entrance to Bell Bay in Enderby Land. Discovered in February 1936 by Discovery Investigations personnel on the William Scoresby, and probably named by them for its resemblance to Le Mont-Saint-Michel on the French coast.

Tillett Booby Islands is a group of small, somewhat dispersed islands, the largest rising 70 m above the sea, lying 5 nautical miles (9 km) northeast of Cape Wilkins. Discovered and named in February 1936 by DI personnel on the William Scoresby.

Tilley Nunatak is a bold, rocky outcrop 5 nautical miles (9 km) south of Hobbs Islands, projecting from the coastal ice cliffs eastward of William Scoresby Bay. Discovered in February 1936 by DI personnel on the William Scoresby and named by them for Professor C.E. Tilley, who studied the rock specimens brought back by the expedition.

Rayner Peak is a prominent peak, 1,270 m, standing 35 nautical miles (60 km) southwest of the head of Edward VIII Bay and 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) west of Robert Glacier. It was discovered in February 1936 by DI personnel on the William Scoresby and was named for George W. Rayner, a zoologist on the DI staff and leader of the expedition.

References

  1. U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: William Scoresby Bay
  2. "Sperring Point". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2018-07-27.

Coordinates: 67°24′S59°34′E / 67.400°S 59.567°E / -67.400; 59.567