William V, Duke of Jülich

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William V, Duke of Jülich
Bornc. 1299
Died(1361-02-26)26 February 1361
Noble family House of Jülich
Spouse(s) Joanna of Hainaut
Father Gerhard V of Jülich
MotherElisabeth of Brabant-Aarschot

William V, Duke of Jülich (c. 1299 – 25/26 February 1361) was a German nobleman. Some authors call him William I, because he was the first Duke of Jülich ; the earlier Williams had been Count of Jülich. Other authors call the subject of this article "William VI"; they count the son and co-ruler of William IV as William V.

William IV, Count of Jülich was the son and heir of William III of Jülich and Mathilde of Limburg, daughter of Waleran III, Duke of Limburg.

Contents

William V was the eldest son of Gerhard V of Jülich and Elisabeth of Brabant-Aarschot, daughter of Godfrey of Brabant. [1]

Gerhard V of Jülich, Count of Jülich (1297–1328), was the youngest son of William IV, Count of Jülich and Richardis of Guelders, daughter of Gerard III, Count of Guelders.

Godfrey of Brabant Lord of Aarschot (1284–1302) and Lord of Vierzon (1277–1302)

Godfrey of Brabant, was the first Lord of Aarschot, between 1284 and his death in 1302, and Lord of Vierzon, between 1277 and 1302.

William V was a key political figure of his time, being a brother-in-law to both Edward III of England and Emperor Ludwig IV. He spent enormous sums of money to have his brother Walram of Jülich appointed as Archbishop of Cologne over Adolph II of the Marck. In 1337 he was crucially involved in the German-English alliance which caused the start of the Hundred Years' War. William was an important supporter of Emperor Ludwig and for a time, he supported the Habsburgs against the House of Luxembourg in the Carinthian war of succession. Upon the collapse of the German-English alliance and the death of his brother-in-law, William switched his allegiance to Emperor Charles IV. In 1352 he initiated an inheritance tax on Heinsberg-Valkenburg/Monschau. William won important positions through his Archbishop brother and also served for a time as a field captain for Flanders in the Hundred Years' War. His sons fought against him during an uprising of part of the Jülich knighthood which opposed inclusion in the increasing territorial state, and he was imprisoned by them in 1349, but released in 1351 due to public pressure.

Edward III of England 14th-century King of England and Duke of Aquitaine

Edward III was King of England and Lord of Ireland from January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His long reign of 50 years was the second longest in medieval England and saw vital developments in legislation and government, in particular the evolution of the English parliament, as well as the ravages of the Black Death.

Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor Holy Roman Emperor

Louis IV, called the Bavarian, of the house of Wittelsbach, was King of the Romans from 1314, King of Italy from 1327, and Holy Roman Emperor from 1328.

Walram of Jülich was Archbishop of Cologne from 1332 to his death in 1349.

Upon his father's death in 1328, William became Count of Jülich. In 1336 William was appointed Margrave by his brother-in-law, Emperor Ludwig IV, and in 1356/57 he was raised to the level of Duke by Emperor Charles IV, thus becoming the first Duke of Jülich. His skillful marriage policy, especially the marriage of his son Gerhard to Margaret of Ravensberg, heiress of Berg and Ravensberg, enabled him to add territory to the house of Jülich. Upon William's death in 1361, the Duchy of Jülich passed to his second son, William, his eldest son having predeceased. William and his wife are buried in Nideggen.

Margrave was originally the medieval title for the military commander assigned to maintain the defence of one of the border provinces of the Holy Roman Empire or of a kingdom. That position became hereditary in certain feudal families in the Empire, and the title came to be borne by rulers of some Imperial principalities until the abolition of the Empire in 1806. Thereafter, those domains were absorbed in larger realms or the titleholders adopted titles indicative of full sovereignty.

Gerhard VI of Jülich, Count of Berg and Ravensberg was the son of William V, Duke of Jülich and Joanna of Hainaut.

Margaret of Ravensberg was the daughter and heiress of Otto IV, Count of Ravensberg and Margaret of Berg-Windeck.

He seems to have held the title of Earl of Cambridge from 1340 to his death.

The title of Earl of Cambridge was created several times in the Peerage of England, and since 1362 the title has been closely associated with the Royal family.

Family and children

On 26 February 1324 in Cologne, William married Joanna of Hainaut (1311/13 – 1374). They had the following children:

Joanna of Hainault (1315–1374) was a Duchess of Jülich by marriage to William V, Duke of Jülich. She was the third daughter of William I, Count of Hainaut, and Joanna of Valois. She was a younger sister of Philippa of Hainault, Queen of England, and Margaret II of Hainault.

  1. Gerhard, Count of Berg and Ravensberg (c. 1325 – 1360), had issue
  2. William, Duke of Jülich (c. 1327 – 1393)
  3. Richardis, married Engelbert III of the Marck
  4. Philippa, married Godfrey II of Heinsberg
  5. Reinold
  6. Joanna, married William I, Count of Isenburg-Wied
  7. Elizabeth, married John Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Kent and Sir Eustache d'Aubrechicourt

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References

  1. Walther Möller, Stammtafeln westdeutscher Adelsgeschlechter im Mittelalter (Darmstadt, 1922, reprint Verlag Degener & Co., 1995), Vol. 1, page 14.
William V, Duke of Jülich
Born:c. 1299 Died: 25/26 February 1361
Preceded by
Gerhard V
Count of Jülich
Duke of Jülich
(since 1356)

13281361
Succeeded by
William II
Peerage of England
Preceded by
New Creation
Earl of Cambridge
13401361
Succeeded by
Extinct