William Wake

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William Wake
Archbishop of Canterbury
William Wake (Gibson).jpg
Portrait by Thomas Gibson
Church Church of England
Diocese Canterbury
In office1716–1737
Predecessor Thomas Tenison
Successor John Potter
Orders
Consecration21 October 1705
by  Thomas Tenison
Personal details
Born(1657-01-26)26 January 1657
Died24 January 1737(1737-01-24) (aged 79)
Lambeth Palace
Buried Croydon Minster
Nationality English
Denomination Anglican
Previous post(s) Dean of Exeter (1703–1705)
Bishop of Lincoln (1705–1716)
Alma mater Christ Church, Oxford

William Wake (26 January 1657 24 January 1737) was a priest in the Church of England and Archbishop of Canterbury from 1716 until his death in 1737.

Contents

Life

Wake was born in Blandford Forum, Dorset, and educated at Christ Church, Oxford. He took orders, and in 1682 went to Paris as chaplain to the ambassador Richard Graham, Viscount Preston (1648–1695). Here he became acquainted with many of the savants of the capital, and was much interested in French clerical affairs. He also collated some Paris manuscripts of the Greek New Testament for John Fell, bishop of Oxford. [1] [2]

He returned to England in 1685; in 1688 he became preacher at Gray's Inn, and in 1689 he received a canonry of Christ Church, Oxford. In 1693 he was appointed rector of St James's Church, Piccadilly. Ten years later he became Dean of Exeter, and in 1705 he was consecrated bishop of Lincoln. He was translated to the see of Canterbury in 1716 on the death of Thomas Tenison. [1] Tenison had been his mentor, and was responsible for his obtaining his bishopric, despite the notable reluctance of Queen Anne, who regarded the appointment of bishops as her prerogative and distrusted Tenison's judgment.[ citation needed ]

In 1718 he negotiated with leading French churchmen about a projected union of the Gallican and English churches to resist the claims of Rome. [3] In dealing with Nonconformism he was tolerant, and even advocated a revision of the Prayer Book if that would allay the scruples of dissenters. [1]

His writings are numerous, the chief being his State of the Church and Clergy of England ... historically deduced (London, 1703). [1] In these writings he produced a massive defence of Anglican Orders and again disproved the Nag's Head Fable by citing a number of documentary sources. [4] The work was written in part as a refutation of the arguments of the "high church" opposition to the perceived erastian policies of King William and the then Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Tenison. He died at his official home, Lambeth Palace.[ citation needed ]

He was buried in Croydon Minster in Surrey.

Collections

Wake bequeathed his collections of printed books, manuscripts and coins to Christ Church. The manuscript volumes include 31 bound volumes of Wake's correspondence. [5]

To the collection of manuscripts belonged minuscule manuscripts of the New Testament: 73, 74, 506-520. These manuscripts came from Constantinople to England about 1731. [6]

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 Chisholm 1911.
  2. In his private collection he had f.e. minuscules 73, 74.
  3. Joseph Hirst Lupton, Archbishop Wake and the Project of Union, 1896
  4. William Wake: Archbishop of Canterbury, 1657–1737 by Norman Sykes
  5. "William Wake Microfilms". Christ Church. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  6. Gregory, Caspar René (1900). Textkritik des Neuen Testaments, Vol. 1. Leipzig. p. 197.

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Minuscule 74, ε 321, is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment leaves. It was written in 1291 or 1292. Some leaves of the codex were lost. It was adapted for liturgical use. It has full marginalia. The manuscript is lacunose.

Minuscule 507, ε 142, is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 11th century. Scrivener labeled it by number 493. It was adapted for liturgical use.

Minuscule 509, ε 258, is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 12th century. Scrivener labeled it by number 495.

Minuscule 510, 496, ε 259, is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. It has been assigned to the 12th century. The manuscript has complex contents. Marginalia are incomplete. It was adapted for liturgical use.

Minuscule 512, ε 441, is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 14th century. Scrivener labelled it by number 498. The manuscript has complex contents. It was adapted for liturgical use.

Minuscule 514, ε 262 Θε14, is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 12th century. Scrivener labelled it by number 500. The manuscript has complex contents.

Minuscule 513, ε 261, is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Dated by a colophon to the 12th century. Scrivener labeled it by number 499. The manuscript is lacunose. Full marginalia. It was adapted for liturgical use.

Minuscule 519, ε 343, is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 13th century. Scrivener labelled it by number 505. The manuscript is lacunose.

Minuscule 520, ε 264, is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 12th century. Scrivener labelled it by number 506. The manuscript has complex contents.

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References

Church of England titles
Preceded by Bishop of Lincoln
1705–1716
Succeeded by
Preceded by Archbishop of Canterbury
1716–1737
Succeeded by