Willis Kienholz

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Willis Kienholz
William S Kienholz.jpg
Kienholz pictured in The Chinook 1911, Washington State yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1875-10-22)October 22, 1875
Kasson, Minnesota
DiedSeptember 20, 1958(1958-09-20) (aged 82)
Seattle, Washington
Playing career
1898–1899 Minnesota
Position(s) Halfback, quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1902 Minnesota (assistant)
1903 Lombard
1904 North Carolina A&M
1905 Colorado
1906 North Carolina
1907 Auburn
1909 Washington State
Head coaching record
Overall26–12–5

William Simmian "Willis" Kienholz (October 10, 1875 – September 20, 1958) was an American football player and coach. He served one-year stints as the head coach at six different colleges: Lombard College in Galesburg, Illinois (1903), North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts—now North Carolina State University (1904), the University of Colorado at Boulder (1905), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (1906), Auburn University (1907), and Washington State University (1909). Kienholz played football at the University of Minnesota in 1898 and 1899.

Contents

Coaching career

Kienholz pictured in Minnesota attire. W S Kienholz.jpg
Kienholz pictured in Minnesota attire.

In 1902, Kienholz was an assistant football coach as his alma mater, Minnesota, working under head coach Henry L. Williams. The next year he was the head football coach at Lombard College in Galesburg, Illinois, leading his team to a championship of Illinois colleges. [1]

In 1904, Kienholz coached at North Carolina A&M, and compiled a 3–1–2 record. In 1905, he coached at Colorado, and compiled an 8–1 record. In 1907, he coached at Auburn, and compiled a 6–2–1 record. In 1909, he coached at Washington State, and compiled a 4–1 record.

Later life and death

Kienholz later served as the director of vocational training for the public schools of Los Angeles, California. He died on September 20, 1958, in Seattle, Washington. [2]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Lombard Olive (Independent)(1903)
1903 Lombard4–3
Lombard:4–3
North Carolina A&M Aggies (Independent)(1904)
1904 North Carolina A&M 3–1–2
North Carolina A&M:3–1–2
Colorado Silver and Gold (Colorado Football Association)(1905)
1905 Colorado 8–1
Colorado:8–1
North Carolina Tar Heels (Independent)(1906)
1906 North Carolina 1–4–2
North Carolina:1–4–2
Auburn Tigers (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1907)
1907 Auburn 6–2–13–2–1T–5th
Auburn:6–2–13–2–1
Washington State (Independent)(1909)
1909 Washington State 4–1
Washington State:4–1
Total:26–12–5

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References

  1. "Carolina Gets Star Football Coach". Greensboro Daily News . Greensboro, North Carolina. February 27, 1906. p. 3. Retrieved April 8, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  2. "Ex-WSC Coach Dies". The Daily Chronicle. Centralia, Washington. Associated Press. September 22, 1958. p. 8. Retrieved September 4, 2016 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .