Winkel projection

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Winkel projection is a group of three projections proposed by German cartographer Oswald Winkel (7 January 1874 – 18 July 1953) in 1921. Winkel projections use arithmetic mean of the equirectangular projection and other projections. Winkel I projection uses sinusoidal projection. [1] Winkel II projection uses Mollweide projection. [2] Winkel Tripel (Winkel III) projection uses Aitoff projection. Winkel I and II projections are pseudocylindrical projections.

Sinusoidal projection pseudocylindrical equal-area map projection

The sinusoidal projection is a pseudocylindrical equal-area map projection, sometimes called the Sanson–Flamsteed or the Mercator equal-area projection. Jean Cossin of Dieppe was one of the first mapmakers to use the sinusoidal, appearing in a world map of 1570.

Mollweide projection map projection

The Mollweide projection is an equal-area, pseudocylindrical map projection generally used for global maps of the world or night sky. It is also known as the Babinet projection, homalographic projection, homolographic projection, and elliptical projection. The projection trades accuracy of angle and shape for accuracy of proportions in area, and as such is used where that property is needed, such as maps depicting global distributions.

Winkel tripel projection compromise map projection defined as the arithmetic mean of the equirectangular projection and the Aitoff projection

The Winkel tripel projection, a modified azimuthal map projection of the world, is one of three projections proposed by German cartographer Oswald Winkel in 1921. The projection is the arithmetic mean of the equirectangular projection and the Aitoff projection: The name tripel refers to Winkel's goal of minimizing three kinds of distortion: area, direction, and distance.

Contents

Winkel tripel projection is the most famous projection in these three projections.

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References

  1. http://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/10.3/guide-books/map-projections/winkel-i.htm
  2. http://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/10.3/guide-books/map-projections/winkel-ii.htm