Winslow, Arizona

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Winslow
Winslow, Arizona Historic District 03.jpg
Navajo County Arizona Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Winslow Highlighted 0483930.svg
Location of Winslow in Navajo County, Arizona.
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Winslow
Location in the United States
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Winslow
Winslow (the United States)
Coordinates: 35°1′43″N110°42′3″W / 35.02861°N 110.70083°W / 35.02861; -110.70083 Coordinates: 35°1′43″N110°42′3″W / 35.02861°N 110.70083°W / 35.02861; -110.70083
Country Flag of the United States.svg  United States
State Flag of Arizona.svg  Arizona
County Navajo
Incorporated 1900
Government
  MayorThomas L. McCauley
Area
[1]
  Total12.33 sq mi (31.93 km2)
  Land12.28 sq mi (31.79 km2)
  Water0.05 sq mi (0.14 km2)
Elevation
4,850 ft (1,478 m)
Population
 (2010) [2]
  Total9,655
  Estimate 
(2018) [3]
9,427
  Density767.98/sq mi (296.52/km2)
Time zone UTC-7 (MST)
ZIP code
86047
Area code(s) 928
FIPS code 04-83930
Website City of Winslow

Winslow (Navajo : Béésh Sinil) is a city in Navajo County, Arizona, in the United States. According to the 2010 census, the population of the city is 9,655. [2] It is approximately 57 miles (92 km) SE of Flagstaff, 240 miles (390 km) W of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and 329 miles (529 km) SE of Las Vegas.

Contents

History

Winslow was named for either Edward F. Winslow, president of St. Louis and San Francisco Rail Road, which owned half of the old Atlantic and Pacific Railroad, or Tom Winslow, a prospector who lived in the area. [4]

The last Harvey House (La Posada Hotel), designed by Mary Colter, opened in 1930. The hotel closed in 1957 and was used by the Santa Fe Railway for offices. The railroad abandoned La Posada in 1994 and announced plans to tear it down. It was bought and restored by Allan Affeldt [5] and it serves as a hotel. [6]

U.S. Route 66 was originally routed through the city. A contract to build Interstate 40 as a bypass north of Winslow was awarded at the end of 1977. I-40 replaced U.S. Route 66 in Arizona in its entirety.

Winslow achieved national fame in 1972 in the Eagles / Jackson Browne song “Take it Easy” which has the line “standing on a corner in Winslow, Arizona."

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1890 363
1900 1,305259.5%
1910 2,38182.5%
1920 3,73056.7%
1930 3,9175.0%
1940 4,57716.8%
1950 6,51842.4%
1960 8,86236.0%
1970 8,066−9.0%
1980 7,921−1.8%
1990 8,1903.4%
2000 9,52016.2%
2010 9,6551.4%
Est. 20189,427 [3] −2.4%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]

As of the census [8] of 2000, there were 9,520 people, 2,754 households, and 1,991 families residing in the city. The population density was 773.1 people per square mile (298.6/km²). There were 3,198 housing units at an average density of 259.7 per square mile (100.3/km²). The city's racial makeup was 40.8% White, 28.84% Hispanic or Latino of any race, 23.47% Native American, 13.49% from other races, 5.18% Black or African American, 1.03% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander and 4.18% from two or more races.

There were 2,754 households, of which 40.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.2% were married couples living together, 16.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.7% were non-families. 23.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.86 and the average family size was 3.40.

In the city, the population was spread out with 29.8% under the age of 18, 11.0% from 18 to 24, 31.1% from 25 to 44, 18.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females, there were 122.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 134.6 males.

The city's median household income was $29,741, and the median family income was $35,825. Males had a median income of $28,365 versus $20,698 for females. The city's per capita income was $12,340. About 17.5% of families and 20.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.9% of those under age 18 and 16.3% of those age 65 or over.

Geography and climate

Winslow is at 35°1′43″N110°42′3″W / 35.02861°N 110.70083°W / 35.02861; -110.70083 (35.028482, −110.700782). [9] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has an area of 12.3 square miles (32 km2), all land. It is approximately 75 miles SE of Flagstaff, 320 miles W of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and 329 miles SE of Las Vegas.

Winslow experiences a dry, temperate arid climate (Köppen BWk), with a wide diurnal temperature variation year-round, averaging 32.7 °F (18.2 °C). Winters are cool and dry, while summers are hot, and bringing the largest portion of the annual precipitation, which is 7.01 inches (178 mm); snowfall averages 8.1 inches (21 cm) per season (July 1 through June 30 of the subsequent year). [10]

Climate data for Winslow Municipal Airport, Arizona (1981–2010 normals, [lower-alpha 1] extremes 1915–present)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)75
(24)
79
(26)
85
(29)
92
(33)
101
(38)
108
(42)
109
(43)
104
(40)
101
(38)
93
(34)
82
(28)
74
(23)
109
(43)
Mean maximum °F (°C)63.1
(17.3)
69.4
(20.8)
76.4
(24.7)
83.9
(28.8)
91.8
(33.2)
99.5
(37.5)
101.6
(38.7)
97.8
(36.6)
92.8
(33.8)
85.0
(29.4)
74.1
(23.4)
63.8
(17.7)
102.1
(38.9)
Average high °F (°C)49.5
(9.7)
55.8
(13.2)
63.6
(17.6)
71.8
(22.1)
81.7
(27.6)
91.6
(33.1)
94.5
(34.7)
91.2
(32.9)
85.2
(29.6)
73.4
(23.0)
60.4
(15.8)
48.6
(9.2)
72.3
(22.4)
Average low °F (°C)20.8
(−6.2)
24.8
(−4.0)
30.4
(−0.9)
36.7
(2.6)
45.4
(7.4)
53.8
(12.1)
61.9
(16.6)
60.8
(16.0)
52.3
(11.3)
39.3
(4.1)
27.9
(−2.3)
20.6
(−6.3)
39.6
(4.2)
Mean minimum °F (°C)8.1
(−13.3)
11.5
(−11.4)
17.9
(−7.8)
25.3
(−3.7)
33.5
(0.8)
42.3
(5.7)
53.5
(11.9)
53.8
(12.1)
40.5
(4.7)
25.9
(−3.4)
13.5
(−10.3)
6.4
(−14.2)
3.8
(−15.7)
Record low °F (°C)−18
(−28)
−9
(−23)
−2
(−19)
14
(−10)
23
(−5)
29
(−2)
42
(6)
41
(5)
29
(−2)
12
(−11)
−9
(−23)
−12
(−24)
−18
(−28)
Average precipitation inches (mm)0.52
(13)
0.46
(12)
0.54
(14)
0.26
(6.6)
0.33
(8.4)
0.18
(4.6)
1.04
(26)
1.20
(30)
0.88
(22)
0.53
(13)
0.51
(13)
0.56
(14)
7.01
(178)
Average snowfall inches (cm)1.9
(4.8)
1.4
(3.6)
1.4
(3.6)
0.1
(0.25)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.7
(1.8)
2.6
(6.6)
8.1
(21)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 inch)4.64.65.02.92.81.96.28.65.13.43.44.553.0
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 inch)1.91.21.10.20000000.71.97.0
Source: NOAA [10] [11]
Birds-eye view of Winslow (looking East), 1890 "Birds Eye View of Winslow, looking East." Atlantic and Pacific Railway cars on converging tracks in the foreground... - NARA - 516374.jpg
Birds-eye view of Winslow (looking East), 1890

Education

Winslow Police and Court Complex Winslow Police & Court Complex.jpg
Winslow Police and Court Complex

Winslow is served by the Winslow Unified School District.

The city has three public elementary schools: Bonnie Brennan Elementary School, Jefferson Elementary School, and Washington Elementary School. Winslow Junior High School and Winslow High School serve the city. Winslow also hosts the Little Colorado Campus of Northland Pioneer College.

Transportation

Diesel freight locomotive which has just come out of the Santa Fe roundhouse at Winslow, 1943. Photo by Jack Delano. ATSF 115 DL 1943.jpg
Diesel freight locomotive which has just come out of the Santa Fe roundhouse at Winslow, 1943. Photo by Jack Delano.

Winslow is served by Winslow-Lindbergh Regional Airport (IATA: INW, ICAO: KINW). Originally constructed by Transcontinental Air Transport, there is no commercial airline service here. The Winslow airport was designed by Charles Lindbergh, who stayed in Winslow during its construction. When it was built, it was the only all-weather airport between Albuquerque, New Mexico and Los Angeles, California.

The city is on BNSF Railway's Southern Transcon route which runs between Los Angeles and Chicago, Illinois. It is also a crew change point for BNSF Railway. The city also has twice-daily Amtrak service at Winslow (Amtrak station) (one train eastbound and one westbound).

Hopi Senom Transit provides bus service from Winslow to the Hopi Reservation. [12]

Interstate 40 runs just north of Winslow; the town is on the historic U.S. Route 66 in Arizona.

Main sights

La Posada Hotel, Winslow La Posada AZ.jpg
La Posada Hotel, Winslow

The historic La Posada hotel has been beautifully restored. It is home to acres of flower and vegetable gardens, the museum of painter Tina Mion, and the Turquoise Room, a world class restaurant and martini bar.

The nearby Meteor Crater, sometimes known as the Barringer Crater and formerly as the Canyon Diablo crater, is a famous impact crater.

Standin' On The Corner Park is a park featuring murals depicting the famous "Girl my Lord in a flatbed Ford". Winslow also has an annual Standin' On The Corner street festival, traditionally held the last week of September.

The Painted Desert and Petrified Forest are about 60 miles (97 km) east of Winslow. The Little Painted Desert is 18 miles (29 km) north of Winslow.

Meteor Crater is a meteorite impact crater and museum approximately 18 miles (29 km) west of Winslow.

Historical events

In the era of steam locomotives, Winslow was an important stop on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway for adding water and fuel to trains. Passengers could disembark and have enough time to have a meal during the extended stop. During the 1920s many celebrities chose to come west to Hollywood and when they stopped in Winslow a parade took place. The local newspaper often documented these special events.

Winslow was also home to a roundhouse and maintenance depot for the Sante Fe. When the station at Barstow, California was given the engineering responsibility for newer diesel locomotives, Winslow began its slow decline. Company brass moved out, as did other employees needed for maintenance and repairs.

In 1949 when the Shah of Iran came to America and toured some sights, he chose to come to the Grand Canyon. His plane landed at the Winslow airport and the entourage took land transport to get to the canyon. [13]

In the 1970s, Winslow was chosen as the site of one of ten Decision Information Distribution System radio stations, designed to alert the public of an enemy attack. The system was never implemented and the station was never built.

9-11 Remembrance Gardens

Winslow is home to the 9-11 Remembrance Gardens, a memorial honoring those who lost their lives during the September 11 attacks. The memorial was constructed using two beams recovered from the wreckage of the World Trade Center towers in New York City.

The 9-11 Memorial in Winslow is a result of the efforts of Bill Herron and Councilwoman Dee Rodríguez, along with a committee, planning for a remembrance. There was news of beams from the Trade Center towers' wreckage being given away and the persons in charge of the wreckage were contacted and agreed to give Winslow beams of 14 and 16 foot length.

Walmart supplied the transportation to Winslow. A large number of citizens donated time and money to the erection of the memorial, which was in place and celebrated on the first anniversary of the event, September 11, 2002. The memorial is at the corner of Transcon Lane and old Route 66 near the Flying J Truck Stop.

Winslow Post Office with zip code 86047. Winslow Post Office.jpg
Winslow Post Office with zip code 86047.

Winslow was mentioned in the popular 1972 song "Take It Easy" written by Jackson Browne and Glenn Frey and performed by the Eagles. [14] [15]

The city was also mentioned in the song 'In the springtime of his voodoo' by Tori Amos.

The Crew video game featured Winslow as a location, [16] as did its sequel The Crew 2 . However, it is incorrectly called Winston, Arizona. It may have been confused with the name of a small town called Winston, New Mexico.

Media

Radio

Television

Notable people

See also

Additional Reading

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. Mean monthly maxima and minima (i.e. the expected highest and lowest temperature readings at any point during the year or given month) calculated based on data at said location from 1981 to 2010.
  1. "2018 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 1, 2019.
  2. 1 2 "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2014-08-23.
  3. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  4. Jeff Scott (2002-08-07). "History and information about Winslow, Arizona". Jeff.scott.tripod.com. Retrieved 2011-12-26.
  5. "La Posada: Masterpiece Saved From The Wrecking Ball". Payson Roundup. 2015-09-18. Retrieved 2016-04-12.
  6. Weiser, Kathy (March 2010). "Winslow, Arizona - Frozen in Time". Legends of America. Retrieved 13 July 2012.
  7. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2016.
  8. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  9. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  10. 1 2 "NowData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration . Retrieved 2019-10-23.
  11. "Station Name: AZ WINSLOW MUNICIPAL AP". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2019-10-23.
  12. "Department of Public Works & Transportation". The Hopi Tribe. Retrieved 2020-01-22.
  13. "Shah Arizona Schedule Set: Entourage To Arrive At Winslow Tuesday". Arizona Republic. November 27, 1949. p. 1.
  14. "Standin' on the Corner Park". RoadsideAmerica.com. Doug Kirby, Ken Smith, Mike Wilkins. Retrieved September 25, 2017.
  15. "Mention the name Winslow, Arizona". Standin' on the Corner Park. Standing On The Corner Park Foundation. Retrieved September 25, 2017.
  16. "Cities And Towns - The Crew - Guide". IGN. 2017-12-18. Retrieved 2018-06-25.