Wiwon County

Last updated
Wiwon County
위원군
County
Korean transcription(s)
  Hanja渭原郡
  McCune-ReischauerWiwŏn kun
  Revised RomanizationWiwon-gun
DPRK2006 Chagang-Wiwon.PNG
Map of Chagang showing the location of Wiwon
Country North Korea
Province Chagang Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 2 workers' districts, 20 ri

Wiwŏn County is a kun, or county, in northern Chagang province, North Korea. It stands across the Yalu River from the People's Republic of China. It was originally part of North P'yŏngan province, but was annexed to Chagang in 1954. It borders Manp'o and Sijungto the north, Kanggye and Songgan to the east, Ch'onch'ŏn to the southeast, Kop'ung to the south and west, and Ch'osan to the west.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers and to the south it is bordered by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Yalu River river on the border between North Korea and China

The Yalu River, also called the Amrok River or Amnok River, is a river on the border between North Korea and China. Together with the Tumen River to its east, and a small portion of Paektu Mountain, the Yalu forms the border between North Korea and China and is notable as a site involved in military conflicts such as the First Sino-Japanese War, the Russo-Japanese War, World War II, and the Korean War.

Contents

The main line of the Kangnam Mountains passes along the southeast border. The highest point is Sunjŏksan (숭적산, 1984 m). High mountains also rise along the border with Kop'ung and Ch'osan. The climate is continental, with cold winters and an average annual temperature of 6 ℃.

Kangnam Mountains mountain in North Korea

The Kangnam Mountains are a mountain range of North Korea, in the central part of the country's northern region. They run parallel to the Amnok River which forms the border with China. They lie west of the Rangrim Mountains, which is the drainage divide between northwestern and northeastern Korea.

The chief local industries are logging and agriculture. There is little valley land, so rice is not grown; however, orchards are cultivated and livestock raised. In addition, dry-field crops include soybeans, maize, and potatoes. In September 2005, North Korea announced the completion of a second power station in Wiwon to supply electric power to the forestry camps. [1]

Administrative divisions

Wiwŏn County is divided into 1 ŭp (town), 2 rodongjagu (workers' districts) and 20 ri (villages):

  • Wiwŏn-ŭp
  • Ryanggang-rodongjagu
  • Ryongyŏl-lodongjagu
  • Chisal-li
  • Ch'angp'yŏng-ri
  • Ch'ukp'o-ri
  • Hwach'ang-ri
  • Hyangyang-ri
  • Kaewŏl-li
  • Kobo-ri
  • Kosŏng-ri
  • Kuam-ri
  • Kwangch'ŏl-li
  • Ŏgong-ri
  • Puhŭng-ri
  • Rangmil-li
  • Ryongtal-li
  • Samgang-ri
  • Sinyŏl-li
  • Songjil-li
  • Taeya-ri
  • Tobong-ri
  • Tŏk'am-ri

See also

Geography of North Korea

North Korea is located in East Asia on the Northern half of the Korean Peninsula.

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References

  1. Pike, John. "Power Station No. 2 of Wiwon Forestry Station Commissioned". www.globalsecurity.org.
Korean language Language spoken in Korea

The Korean language is an East Asian language spoken by about 77 million people. It is a member of the Koreanic language family and is the official and national language of both Koreas: North Korea and South Korea, with different standardized official forms used in each country. It is also one of the two official languages in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County of Jilin province, China. It is also spoken in parts of Sakhalin, Ukraine and Central Asia.