Women's Hockey World Cup

Last updated

Women's Hockey World Cup
Current season, competition or edition:
Field hockey current event.svg 2018 Women's Hockey World Cup
Sport Field hockey
Founded1974
No. of teams16
ContinentInternational (FIH)
Most recent
champion(s)
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands (8th title)
Most titlesFlag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands (8 titles)
Official website www.fih.ch

The Women's Hockey World Cup is the field hockey World Cup competition for women, whose format for qualification and the final tournament is similar to the men's. It has been held since 1974. The tournament has been organized by the International Hockey Federation (FIH) since they merged with the International Federation of Women's Hockey Associations (IFWHA) in 1982. Since 1986, it has been held regularly once every four years, in the same year as the men's competition, which is mid-cycle between Summer Olympic games.

Field hockey Team sport version of hockey played on grass or turf with sticks and a round ball

Field hockey is a team game of the hockey family. The game can be played on grass, water turf, artificial turf or synthetic field as well as an indoor board surface. Each team plays with eleven players, including the goalie. Players use sticks made out of wood, carbon fibre, fibre glass or a combination of carbon fibre and fibre glass in different quantities to hit a round, hard, plastic ball. The length of the stick is based on the player's individual height. Only one face of the stick is allowed to be used. Goalies often have a different kind of stick, however they can also use an ordinary field hockey stick. The specific goal-keeping sticks have another curve at the end of the stick, this is to give them more surface area to save the ball. The uniform consists of shin guards, shoes, shorts, a mouth guard and a jersey. Today, the game is played globally, mainly in parts of Western Europe, South Asia, Southern Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, and parts of the United States. Known simply as "hockey" in many territories, the term "field hockey" is used primarily in Canada and the United States where ice hockey is more popular. In Sweden, the term "landhockey" is used and to some degree also in Norway where it is governed by Norway's Bandy Association.

International Hockey Federation International sports governing body

The Fédération Internationale de Hockey, commonly known by the acronym FIH, is the international governing body of field hockey and indoor field hockey. Its headquarters are in Lausanne, Switzerland and the president is Narinder Batra. FIH is responsible for field hockey's major international tournaments, notably the World Cup.

Contents

Of the fourteen tournaments held so far, only four teams have won the event. Netherlands is by far the most successful team, having won the title eight times. Argentina, Germany and Australia are joint second best teams, having each won the title twice. So far, the Netherlands and Australia are the two champions able to defend their titles. At the end of the 2018 World Cup, fifteen nations had reached the semifinal of the tournament.

Netherlands womens national field hockey team womens national field hockey team representing the Netherlands

The Netherlands' national women's field hockey team is currently number one on the FIH world rankings and the reigning world champion. The Netherlands is the most successful team in World Cup history, having won the title a record eight times. The team has also won eight Olympic medals.

The Argentina women's national field hockey team is governed by the Argentine Hockey Confederation (CAH). The current coach is Carlos Retegui, who was appointed after Agustín Corradini. The team is currently third in the FIH World Rankings since july 2019 after their 4th place at the 2019 FIH Pro League.

Germany womens national field hockey team

The Germany women's national field hockey team has represented the unified Germany since 1991. The team won the gold medal at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece, by defeating the Netherlands in the final.

The size of the tournament has changed over time. The 1974 and 1978 World Cups featured 10 nations (smallest); the 1976 World Cup featured 11 nations; the 2002 World Cup featured 16 nations (largest), and the remaining seven World Cups have featured 12 nations. The World Cup will expand to 16 teams again in 2018, and the FIH will evaluate the possibility of increasing it to 24 in 2022. [1]

The 2018 tournament was held in London, England from 21 July to 5 August, [2] with Netherlands winning a second consecutive title and a record eighth title after beating Ireland 6–0 in the final.

London Capital of the United Kingdom

London is the capital and largest city of England and the United Kingdom, with the largest municipal population in the European Union. Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that follow closely its medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.

Ireland womens national field hockey team womens national field hockey team representing Ireland

The Ireland women's national field hockey team is organised by Hockey Ireland and represents both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland in international women's field hockey competitions, including the Women's Hockey World Cup and the Women's EuroHockey Nations Championship. They have previously competed in the Women's Intercontinental Cup, the Women's Hockey Champions Challenge, Women's FIH Hockey World League and the Women's FIH Hockey Series. On 2 March 1896, Ireland played England in the first ever women's international field hockey match. Ireland were finalists and silver medallists at the 2018 Women's Hockey World Cup.

Results

Summaries

YearHostFinalThird place match
WinnerScoreRunner-upThird placeScoreFourth place
1974
Details
Mandelieu, FranceFlag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
1–0
after extra time
Flag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
Flag of Germany.svg
West Germany
2–0Flag of India.svg
India
1976
Details
West Berlin, West GermanyFlag of Germany.svg
West Germany
2–0Flag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
1–0Flag of Belgium (civil).svg
Belgium
1978
Details
Madrid, SpainFlag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
1–0Flag of Germany.svg
West Germany
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg
Belgium
0–0
(3–2)
Penalty strokes
Flag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
1981
Details
Buenos Aires, ArgentinaFlag of Germany.svg
West Germany
1–1
(3–1)
Penalty strokes
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg
Soviet Union
5–1Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
1983
Details
Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaFlag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
4–2Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
3–1Flag of Germany.svg
West Germany
1986
Details
Amstelveen, NetherlandsFlag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
3–0Flag of Germany.svg
West Germany
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
3–2
after extra time
Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand
1990
Details
Sydney, AustraliaFlag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
3–1Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg
South Korea
3–2Flag of England.svg
England
1994
Details
Dublin, IrelandFlag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
2–0Flag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
2–1Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
1998
Details
Utrecht, NetherlandsFlag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
3–2Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
3–2Flag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
2002
Details
Perth, AustraliaFlag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
1–1
(4–3)
Penalty strokes
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China
2–0Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
2006
Details
Madrid, SpainFlag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
3–1Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
Flag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
5–0Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
2010
Details
Rosario, ArgentinaFlag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
3–1Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
Flag of England.svg
England
2–0Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
2014
Details
The Hague, NetherlandsFlag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
2–0Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
Flag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
2–1Flag of the United States.svg
United States
2018
Details
London, EnglandFlag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
6–0Flag of Ireland hockey team.svg
Ireland
Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
3–1Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia

Successful national teams

TeamTitlesRunners-upThird placesFourth places
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 8 (1974, 1978, 1983, 1986*, 1990, 2006, 2014*, 2018)4 (1981, 1998*, 2002, 2010)1 (1976)
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 2 (2002, 2010*)3 (1974, 1976, 1994)3 (1978, 2006, 2014)1 (1998)
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 2 (1994, 1998)3 (1990*, 2006, 2014)1 (1983)3 (1981, 2002*, 2018)
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany^2 (1976*, 1981)2 (1978, 1986)2 (1974, 1998)3 (1983, 1994, 2010)
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1 (1983)1 (1986)
Flag of Ireland hockey team.svg  Ireland 1 (2018)
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 1 (1978)1 (1976)
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1 (1994)1 (2014)
Flag of England.svg  England 1 (2010)1 (1990)
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 1 (2018)1 (2006*)
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union#1 (1981)
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 1 (1990)
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 1 (2002)
Flag of India.svg  India 1 (1974)
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 1 (1986)
* = host nation
^ = includes results representing West Germany between 1974 and 1990
# = states that have since split into two or more independent nations

Performance by continental zones

ContinentBest performance
Europe 10 titles, won by the Netherlands (8) and Germany (2)
America 2 titles, won by Argentina
Oceania 2 titles, won by Australia
Asia Third place (Korea, 1990 and China, 2002)
Africa Seventh place (South Africa, 1998)

Team appearances

Team Flag of France.svg
1974
Flag of Germany.svg
1976
Flag of Spain (1977-1981).svg
1978
Flag of Argentina.svg
1981
Flag of Malaysia.svg
1983
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
1986
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
1990
Flag of Ireland.svg
1994
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
1998
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
2002
Flag of Spain.svg
2006
Flag of Argentina.svg
2010
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
2014
Flag of England.svg
2018
Total
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 2nd2nd3rd6th9th7th9th2nd4th1st3rd1st3rd6th14
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 4th3rd6th2nd1st1st4th2nd5th2nd4th11
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 8th9th12th3
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 5th4th3rd8th12th10th6
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 5th5th2nd3rd10th10th6
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia#9thDefunct1
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 6th7th11th3rd10th8th6th16th8
Flag of England.svg  England 5th5th4th9th9th5th7th3rd11th7th10
Flag of France.svg  France 7th6th9th3
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany^3rd1st2nd1st4th2nd8th4th3rd7th8th4th8th5th14
Flag of India.svg  India 4th7th11th12th11th9th8th7
Flag of Ireland hockey team.svg  Ireland 12th11th15th2nd4
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 10th9th2
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 6th7th11th10th5th11th10th13th8
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 10th7th11th3
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 1st3rd1st2nd1st1st1st6th2nd2nd1st2nd1st1st14
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 7th4th7th6th11th7th5th11th8
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 11th10th2
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia Part of the Soviet Union12th16th2
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 8th10th10th12th4
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 7th13th12th10th9th15th6
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 3rd5th5th6th9th6th7th12th8
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union#3rd10th8thDefunct3
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 6th5th8th10th11th5th8th8th4th12th3rd11
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 9th8th2
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine Part of the Soviet Union14th1
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 6th9th12th3rd8th9th6th4th14th9
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 12th1
Total1011101212121212121612121216171
^ = includes results representing West Germany between 1974 and 1990
# = states that have since split into two or more independent nations

Debut of teams

YearDebutantsTotal
1974 Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina, Flag of Austria.svg  Austria, Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium, Flag of France.svg  France, Flag of India.svg  India, Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico, Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands, Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg  Spain, Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland, Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany^10
1976 Flag of Italy.svg  Italy, Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 2
1978 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada, Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia*, Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 3
1981 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia, Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union*2
1983 Flag of England.svg  England, Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand, Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland, Flag of the United States.svg  United States, Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 5
1986 Flag of Ireland hockey team.svg  Ireland 1
1990 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China, Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg  South Korea 2
1994 Flag of Germany.svg  Germany^, Flag of Russia.svg  Russia#1 (+1)
1998 Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 1
2002 Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine#1
2006 0
2010 0
2014 0
2018 0
Total28 (+1^)
* = Defunct Team
# = Part of Soviet Union (1974–1990)
^ = Germany is official successor of West Germany

Argentina, Germany and the Netherlands are the only teams to have competed at each World Cup; 28 teams have competed in at least one World Cup.

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. "World Cup field to expand to 16 teams in 2018". FIH. 1 November 2012. Retrieved 3 November 2012.
  2. "Vitality Hockey Women's World Cup London 2018". FIH. Retrieved 5 August 2018.