Women's Lacrosse World Cup

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Women playing Lacrosse Lacrosse women cropped.jpg
Women playing Lacrosse

The Women's Lacrosse World Cup (WLWC), the international championship of women's lacrosse, is held every four years. From its inception in 1982, it was sponsored by the governing body for women's lacrosse, the International Federation of Women's Lacrosse Associations, until that body merged in 2008 with the former governing body for men's lacrosse. Since 2009, the WLWC has been sponsored by the sport's new unified governing body, the Federation of International Lacrosse. The 2017 Women's Lacrosse World Cup was held in Guildford, England, and was won by the United States over Canada by the score of 10-5.

Womens lacrosse team sport

Women's lacrosse, sometimes shortened to lax, is a sport with twelve players on each team. Originally played by indigenous peoples of the Americas, the modern women's game was introduced in 1890 at the St Leonard's School in St Andrews, Scotland. The rules of women's lacrosse differ significantly from men's field lacrosse.

Lacrosse team sport

Lacrosse is a team sport played with a lacrosse stick and a lacrosse ball. Players use the head of the lacrosse stick to carry, pass, catch, and shoot the ball into the goal.

The 2017 FIL Women's Lacrosse World Cup, the tenth World Cup, is the preeminent international women's lacrosse tournament. The tournament is being held at the Surrey Sports Park in Guildford, Surrey, in the South East of England, with 25 nations competing. Rathbones Investment Management plc committed as the title sponsor for the event in 2014. Other Gold Level sponsors include RPC.

Contents

History

Four players took part in all of the first five editions of the Women's Lacrosse World Cup, Vivien Jones of Wales, Lois Richardson of England, and Sue Sofanos and Marge Barlow both of Australia. [1]

Vivien Jones was a lacrosse player who made the highest number of appearances for a women's international team.

Championship games

YearHost cityCountryChampionRunner-UpScore
1982 Nottingham Flag of England.svg  England United States Australia 10-7 (ET)
1986 Philadelphia Flag of the United States.svg  United States AustraliaUnited States10-7
1989 Perth Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia United States England 6-5 (SD OT)
1993 Edinburgh Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland United StatesEngland4-1
1997 Tokyo Flag of Japan.svg  Japan United StatesAustralia3-2 (SD OT)
2001 High Wycombe Flag of England.svg  England United StatesAustralia14-8
2005 Annapolis Flag of the United States.svg  United States AustraliaUnited States14-7
2009 Prague Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic United StatesAustralia8-7
2013 Oshawa Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada United StatesCanada19-5
2017 Guildford Flag of England.svg  England United StatesCanada10-5
2021 Towson Flag of the United States.svg  United States

Medal table

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States 82010
2Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 2439
3Flag of England.svg  England 0246
4Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 0224
5Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 0011
Totals (5 nations)10101030


Past Results

Team1982
Flag of England.svg
(6)
1986
Flag of the United States.svg
(6)
1989
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
(6)
1993
Flag of Scotland.svg
(8)
1997
Flag of Japan.svg
(7)
2001
Flag of England.svg
(8)
2005
Flag of the United States.svg
(10)
2009
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
(16)
2013
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
(19)
2017
Flag of England.svg
(25)
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 2nd1st3rd3rd2nd2nd1st2nd3rd4th
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 14th13th
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 25th
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 3rd4th4th4th5th4th4th3rd2nd2nd
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 24th
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 22nd
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 8th8th9th10th
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 15th
Flag of England.svg  England 5th5th2nd2nd3rd3rd3rd4th4th3rd
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 16th
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 8th9th10th12th14th
Flag of the Iroquois Confederacy.svg  Iroquois 11th7th12th
Flag of Hong Kong.svg  Hong Kong 18th18th
Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 5th10th13th
Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 8th6th
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 11th
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 7th7th7th5th7th9th9th
Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia 17th17th
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 20th
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 13th14th16th
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 10th12th11th8th
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 4th3rd5th5th6th6th7th8th6th5th
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 16th15th15th
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 23rd
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 19th21st
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 19th
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1st2nd1st1st1st1st2nd1st1st1st
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Wales 6th6th6th6th4th5th6th6th5th7th

See also

The World Lacrosse Championship (WLC) is the international men's field lacrosse championship organized by World Lacrosse that occurs every four years.

The Under-19 World Lacrosse Championships (U-19) are held separately for men and women every four years to award world championships for the under-19 age group in men's lacrosse and women's lacrosse. The tournaments are sanctioned by World Lacrosse.

Related Research Articles

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Lacrosse in England is an amateur sport played mainly by community based clubs and university teams. Field lacrosse was introduced to England in 1876 by William George Beers and other Canadians who toured the country playing exhibition matches. A second tour was arranged in 1883; by then England had 60 clubs playing regular fixtures in Cambridgeshire, Cheshire, Lancashire, Middlesex and Yorkshire.

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Welsh Lacrosse Association

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References

  1. Goulding, Neil (9 January 2006). "Lois Richardson commits to England..." English Lacrosse Association. Retrieved 9 May 2011.